Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    151

    Servicing Shimano PD-M324 Pedals?

    My Shimano PD-M324's are in dire need of a good service and new quality grease. I've serviced my PD-M520's before, which were easy enough. However on this pedal, there is nothing to undo to take the spindle out. Instead of the bolt you usually find on Shimano pedals, there is a black rubber thing. How can I service my pedals? Is it the same process as servicing other Shimano pedals where I take the spindle out, add new grease, thread back in and purge the old grease out?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bvibert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    836
    Maybe this will help:

    http://www.shimano.com/media/techdoc...9830608609.pdf

    Looks like you need to pop off the end cap to access the nut holding the axle in.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,629
    You would need the service tools (listed in the pdf) in order to take the spindle out (and then properly preload it).

    Considering their cost, it may behoove you to buy a new pair of pedals, or one of the pedals opened with a wrench/plastic service tool.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    151
    The TL-PD33 Cone Adjusting tool is necessary for just removing the spindle and regreasing it?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bvibert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    836
    Quote Originally Posted by Tsetse View Post
    The TL-PD33 Cone Adjusting tool is necessary for just removing the spindle and regreasing it?
    I bet you could get it apart without the tool, but putting it back together and adjusting the bearing preload will probably be pretty difficult without it.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    151
    Tried to take the end caps of mine, but they're quite seized on. Not sure if I want to disassemble it without the proper tools. The whole pedal is creaking and you can hear how dry it is inside.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bvibert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    836
    I've heard of some people being able to hold the cone adjust nut with a small flat head screwdriver while tightening down the lock nut with a socket. It doesn't sound optimal, but I guess it could be done.

    You could try popping the end cap off and just pushing some grease in there... That might buy you some time...

    I found the tool on eBay for $99, that doesn't seem worth it to repair pedals that you can get for $40-$50.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,629
    The tool isn't even worth owning as a shop. The time it takes in labor to pop the pedals open, re-grease/replace bearings, close them up, and re-install them would wind up costing as much as the pedal.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Posts
    3
    Make your own tool. If you have access to a mill and lathe (or drill press) its really easy. But I imagine it could be done without, it would just take a little longer.
    1. Find a 13mm socket, make sure it's walls are thin enough that it fits inside the pedal onto the 13mm nut.
    2. Measure the OD of a 10mm socket. Drill out the driver side of a 13mm socket to as close to the OD of your 10mm socket as possible, you need to keep as much wall thickness as possible on the 13mm socket. Just drill down to the hex.
    3. See if your 10mm will fit inside the newly drilled hole. If your 10mm socket won't, grind the 10mm down until it will. A bench grinder and power drill work well for this.
    4. Mill (or possibly bench grind) flats on opposite sides of the OD of the 13mm socket. Do this on the drilled out end.

    Use a small crescent wrench on the flats to turn the 13mm. And your standard socket for the 10mm inside it.

Similar Threads

  1. Shimano Saint REAR hub servicing
    By Christopher Robin in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2012, 05:44 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-17-2012, 07:15 PM
  3. Help Servicing an 09 Magura Thor/Generally servicing forks?
    By arekieh in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-11-2011, 12:54 PM
  4. Shimano 8-speed Alfine servicing needed in San Jose area
    By Leopold Porkstacker in forum Internal Gear Hubs
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-10-2011, 08:35 PM
  5. Shimano 8-speed Alfine servicing needed in San Jose area
    By Leopold Porkstacker in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 03-08-2011, 06:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •