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  1. #1
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    Removing Jammed Tight Pedals

    I put on some Shimano M540 Pedals maybe in 2008. In trying to remove them I used 8mm hex with about a yard length of piping for leverage. The hex key stripped and those pedals are on tight. They are on a Campy crank and I don't want to use heat from a torch to heat the crank arms to loosen them up because I don't know if it is safe to do so. Cooling the pedals with dry ice won't work in this situation for the reverse because the area to be cooled is really inaccessible.

    I ordered a park hex wrench, hopefully it be will more hardened. Is it safe to heat the crank arm or is there a better way to do this. Any help is appreciated.
    Last edited by JukeboxJezabel; 1 Week Ago at 02:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    Removing Jammed Tight Pedals

    I know that i was only successful in taking a bud's CB pedal out by using torch heat.
    2014 TREK FARLEY
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  3. #3
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    I think there is no way around for me either. I don't want to discolor the metal. There seems to be some sort of Scotch Guard finish on the crank.

  4. #4
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    If you're willing to sacrifice the pedal you can remove the body and bearings and then get a pipe wrench on the spindle. I'd just about guarantee that'll move it.

  5. #5
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    That was a thought but with a thin pair of vice grips & some rubber tape. They still have some life in them though the left pedal doesn't clinch as well from winter salt spray. Pipe wrench you're right would pop those suckers right off.

  6. #6
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    Removing Jammed Tight Pedals

    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    If you're willing to sacrifice the pedal you can remove the body and bearings and then get a pipe wrench on the spindle. I'd just about guarantee that'll move it.
    +1 - Big pipe wrench works every time.

    I had to do this to remove an over torqued XTR spindle from a 180mm M952 crank arm. I got it to bite on the spindle at ~170 degrees (between the wrench handle and the crank arm) and broke it free using body weight.
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  7. #7
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    Removing Jammed Tight Pedals

    The safest way to do this without dammaging your cranks is to heat the crank up. Do this by using boiled water, just poor it over the crank and the pedal. The alluminium will expand faster than the steel.


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  8. #8
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    Removing Jammed Tight Pedals

    Are you turning the wrench in the right direction? Just a thought...

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by marc / fisherbike View Post
    The safest way to do this without dammaging your cranks is to heat the crank up. Do this by using boiled water, just poor it over the crank and the pedal. The alluminium will expand faster than the steel.
    That's an idea! Thanks

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Haggis View Post
    Are you turning the wrench in the right direction? Just a thought...
    I'm doing it in the right direction. Prior to these I had Look Nevadas that lasted 14 years. I had less hassle removing those than I'm having with these.

  11. #11
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    I like to remove pedals about once/year, clean and grease the threads, saves the pain of this....

    Sometimes a solid hard hammer hit to the hex wrench helps to break them free.
    Riding.....

  12. #12
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    Liquid wrench, then above comments.

  13. #13
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    Impact driver or impact gun. Loosens without applying as much torque, works great.

  14. #14
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    Impact works best. Liquid wrench helps. Put a pedal wrench on, and start hammering the end of the wrench with medium force in the direction loosening the pedal. The impacts will loosen it up.

  15. #15
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    I just removed some super tight pedals with a 15mm wrench, a cheater bar, and a friend.

  16. #16
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    +1 on the heat method...You can just use a hair dryer for the heat source.. It will heat up enough to expand the crank arm

  17. #17
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    I needed to strip the pedal body out from the axle and grind two flats to the axle and then wrench it out by force. Tried everything else before that such as heat, CRC 5-56, pipe wrench (was too soft medal, the axle actually started to deform the pipe wrench teeth and was too hard / slippery for pipe wrench to grab) and vice grips.

    When they finally got out there were some small metal shavings but the crank thread luckily still took new pedals quite easily. Still don't know what actually caused this seize as the installation was only couple of months old and done with the grease. Also the installation was easy so I didn't cross-thread at that point. I'm purely speculating whether some rock hits could have dislodged the pedal a little bit in the threads.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by haral View Post
    I needed to strip the pedal body out from the axle and grind two flats to the axle and then wrench it out by force. Tried everything else before that such as heat, CRC 5-56, pipe wrench (was too soft medal, the axle actually started to deform the pipe wrench teeth and was too hard / slippery for pipe wrench to grab) and vice grips.

    When they finally got out there were some small metal shavings but the crank thread luckily still took new pedals quite easily. Still don't know what actually caused this seize as the installation was only couple of months old and done with the grease. Also the installation was easy so I didn't cross-thread at that point. I'm purely speculating whether some rock hits could have dislodged the pedal a little bit in the threads.
    take them out, use Plumbers Tape (AKA Teflon tape) .. will hold the threads, and it keeps them from seizing together.. doesn't wash out like grease does.. will never have that issue again.
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  19. #19
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    When it comes to bottom bracket threads, pedal threads, and spoke threads, I use a metal free anti-seize. LOCTITE Heavy Duty Anti-Seize - Henkel
    Put a mountain biker in a room with 2 bowling balls and we'll break one and lose the other - GelatiCruiser

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by SandSpur View Post
    When it comes to bottom bracket threads, pedal threads, and spoke threads, I use a metal free anti-seize. LOCTITE Heavy Duty Anti-Seize - Henkel
    That's good, but I've found in most cases the tape is better, it fills/tighten threads better than regular locktite, but also acts like your never seize and costs 1/10th the price, allows for smooth torquing and is MUCH easier to clean up after and during regular disassembly maintenance as a quick run around the threads with your finger removes it.
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

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