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  1. #1
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    Putting together basic tool kit...What am I missing?

    Putting together a basic kit to do my repairs and I already have some things,but need your guys opinions on what I may need. I'll buy more when/if needed.

    Have:
    Basic tools....wrenches,sockets,etc.
    Chain breaker tool
    Park 3-way hex
    Topeak multi tool
    Long handled ball allen wrenches (sae and metric)
    Extra KMC missing link.....chain links

    On order:
    Park cassette removal tool (FR-5)
    Park sprocket remover/chain whip (SR-1)
    Park Master link pliers (MLP-1)

    Need:
    Bottom Bracket tool
    Cone wrenches? (13,15,17)?
    2011 Rockhopper Comp 29er
    2011 Myka HT Disc (wife)

  2. #2
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    Headset press and puller set..

    Torque wrench?


    And a BFH.

  3. #3
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    Headset tools: hold off until its necessary. It may be a better option to take it to bike tech as well. Most bikes dont need headset service often.
    Get the best tire pump you can afford. You'll have it a long time and if it sucks, that seems even longer. Air for shocks? Same story. Oh, and a quality tire guage, especially if you opt for a sucky pump.
    BB tools to fit YOUR bike(s), plus your buddy's bike if he's the type to bring some beer while you help him fix his bike.
    I notice no spoke wrench. Truing wheels isn't rocket science.
    I like the plastic tire tools from park, but they are NOT the only ones.
    I use my cheap dial caliper a lot...and combined with a cheap calculator, I never guess at things.
    You CAN get by with a pocket chain tool, but a shop model brings joy.
    I Love my Pedro's cable cutter, but there are others just as good

    Spares: if you ride near home or near reputable shops a lot you're fine. Locals took a trip to Copper Harbor recently without considering this and wished they had. Obviously bike-specific, but tubes, tires, and chains/links are at top of list.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Oldfatbaldguy View Post
    Headset tools: hold off until its necessary. It may be a better option to take it to bike tech as well. Most bikes dont need headset service often.
    Get the best tire pump you can afford. You'll have it a long time and if it sucks, that seems even longer. Air for shocks? Same story.

    I'll grab one.

    BB tools to fit YOUR bike(s), plus your buddy's bike if he's the type to bring some beer while you help him fix his bike.

    Took a while but,finally figured out what I needed.

    I notice no spoke wrench. Truing wheels isn't rocket science.

    Good catch. I'll grab one.

    I like the plastic tire tools from park, but they are NOT the only ones.

    Have them.

    I use my cheap dial caliper a lot...and combined with a cheap calculator, I never guess at things.
    You CAN get by with a pocket chain tool, but a shop model brings joy.
    I Love my Pedro's cable cutter, but there are others just as good

    Spares: if you ride near home or near reputable shops a lot you're fine. Locals took a trip to Copper Harbor recently without considering this and wished they had. Obviously bike-specific, but tubes, tires, and chains/links are at top of list.

    Got my spares.
    Thanks for the info.
    2011 Rockhopper Comp 29er
    2011 Myka HT Disc (wife)

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris.S. View Post
    And a BFH.
    My adjustable wrench is used as a BFH just as often as it's used as a wrench (not often, though).

    Torx keys would be a good idea. And some quality cable cutters. Nothing worse than trying to force a frayed cable into housing. I like my Park cutters. They've stayed sharp for the ~6 years that I've had them, even after the time that I used them to cut the aluminum stays on my fenders.

    Regarding pumps, quality is definitely something to look for. But you can get quality for low amount of money. My Sette shock pump was ~$20 and works great, including the two-step chuck removal.

    You'll also want some different lubes (wet and dry) and some grease.

    Shop rags. Old t-shirts/socks work great.

    Zip-ties. Those always come in handy.
    I've made some bad decisions like taking the gears off my bike. So here's the warning: Do not as I say, nor as I do.

  6. #6
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    A decent work stand.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by J.B. Weld View Post
    A decent work stand.
    Had one for a few months now.
    2011 Rockhopper Comp 29er
    2011 Myka HT Disc (wife)

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the input,It's appreciated.
    2011 Rockhopper Comp 29er
    2011 Myka HT Disc (wife)

  9. #9
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    Never-seize, like Franks hot sauce, I put that **** on everything. Okay, not quite everything. And Loctite, the blue medium strength stuff.

  10. #10
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    I agree with everybody's suggestions... perhaps add a Rubber Mallet if you don't already have one.
    Although they are not officially a "tools"... I would suggest having a spare derailleur hangar and a "missing link chain" in your tool kit and pack it with your riding tools set.
    John 3:16

  11. #11
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    Cable cutters for sure. And a little awl and file to clean up the ends. Makes redoing cables so easy.

    Depending on a bike and parts, a T-25 will be needed.

    Sounds like you also need an adjustable wrench (for cassette removal tool usage/etc)

    A Harbor Freight T handle allen set is cheap and way easier/better than the 3 way: 18 Piece T-Handle Ball Point and Hex Key Wrench Set Toss the american wrenches and use the stand

    I would get a torkey as well for easy handlebar/stem/etc installations. I use the hell out of mine: Amazon.com: Ritchey TorqKey 5Nm with 4 bits M5/4/3/T-15: Sports & Outdoors

    Lastly, a decent torque wrench and a set of hex ends goes a long way in making sure that your crank and suspension bolts are all set at the right torque (Amazon.com: VENZO Bicycle Bike Torque Wrench Allen Key Tool Socket Set Kit: Sports & Outdoors)

    You can save a few bucks on the torque setup with wrench from HF (1/4" Torque Wrench - 20-200 in. lbs.) and a separate hex set (Amazon.com: Pedro's Hex Bit Set: Sports & Outdoors)

    -Tom

  12. #12
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    With all the Carbon frames now, you'd be crazy to tighten a bolt by guessing, and take the risk of cracking a $1000+ frame. Torque Wrench is imperative. Also I like to stock up on a good supply of Ferrels 4.5 & 5.0mm, and cable ends. Can't stand cables fraying, and it will make your bike look more professional if you make sure you have cables end on every cable. Good Bench vise also goes a long way. If you get a crank extractor, get the kind that requires a wrench(shop quality), as they are not that much more, and you get better quality without having to pay for that stupid handle that is not as good.
    That's enough for now.

  13. #13
    rjx
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    Can I use the Ritchey TorqKey with any hadlebar / stem? I'd hate to need an expensive torque wrench set just to swap stems and handlebars.

    Thanks.

  14. #14
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    Yeah, most handlebars/stems/seat post clamps I see are rated for 5-6 nm so the Torque Key should work well. I just ordered one in fact now that I have two carbon frame bikes. That way I can make quick stem, handlebar, seat adjustments and not have to lug out my torque wrench.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psycle151 View Post
    Friggin' coward. Give me a red chiclet instead of debating like a man. You don't deserve your green blocks.

  15. #15
    rjx
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nubster View Post
    Yeah, most handlebars/stems/seat post clamps I see are rated for 5-6 nm so the Torque Key should work well. I just ordered one in fact now that I have two carbon frame bikes. That way I can make quick stem, handlebar, seat adjustments and not have to lug out my torque wrench.
    Thank you for your reply.

  16. #16
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    The small torque's are OK, but for around $50 Performance and a couple other places have small Torque sets with just about all the bits including Torx bits that you'd need. Stems go a little higher like 7-10 Nwt, than seatposts. I do brake and shifte cables around 5 Nwt.

    Quote Originally Posted by rjx View Post
    Thank you for your reply.

  17. #17
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    Putting together basic tool kit...What am I missing?

    A pedal wrench and/or a large enough Allen, depending on your pedals.

    A 8mm or 10mm Allen is also needed for some older model Shimano cranks. (2005 vintage?). Many Allen sets don't come with a 10mm.

    Another thing to consider is a 7mm open end wrench needed for Shimano brake bleed nipples. I had a set of wrenches that stopped at 8mm. Grrrr.

    The only time I've ever used come wrenches are my my old Shimano hubs. If you're running sealed bearing hubs, there may be no need at all for cone wrenches. Unless there is another use for them that I'm not aware of.

    A lot of tools that used to be key to a good bike workbench are now obsolete unless you're wrenching older bikes. Crank pullers are one example.
    I live with fear and danger every day. And on the weekends she lets me go mountain biking.

  18. #18
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    They're not tools, but...lots of rags or shop towels. They're always useful (not just for cleaning) and seem to be impossible to find when you need them the most. Electrical tape is also handy for keeping cables under control and protecting frames. Ugly, but handy.

  19. #19
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    magnetic tray for small parts and bolts >> HF

    nitrile gloves >> HF too.
    25-30mm diameter soft-faced hammer/deadblow >> Nupla/Craftsman no need for a steel faced one.

    size 1 and 2 JIS screwdrivers >> Vessel/Anex/Sunflag.

    3-12Nm 1/4" torque wrench/screwdriver >> no bike tool brand, ever!
    20-100Nm 3/8" torque wrench >> no bike tool brand, ever!

    quality hex and Torx 25 and/or 50mm long 1/4" bits >> Wiha/Wera/Felo/etc.

    metric hex drivers and long hex ball L-wrenches set (1.5 to 10mm) >> Bondhus or Eklind are fine.

    bottom bracket + cassette lockring sockets with square drive for ratchet/torque wrench/breaker bar.

    long 3/8" breaker bar for stubborn lockrings >> Wright/Proto/whatever as long as it's comfortable and sturdy.

    caliper >> pretty much anything will do including HF.

    short stainless steel metric ruler(15 to 20cm)

    good cable cutter >> Shimano/Felco/Knipex

    awl for cable housing

    small metal files and quality saw blades

    punches

    pliers with non-marring soft jaws(like the IPS sold by Tamiya in RC stores)

    non-sticky harness tape >> 3M

    medium threadlocker compound >> Loctite

    spoke wrench >> Spokey

    your old toothbrushes >> cheap and efficient for nooks and crannies...

    rotor truing tools like Morningstar's. a suitable adjustable wrench can be used too.


    of course more tools will be needed depending on what you plan to do.

  20. #20
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    Listen!

    forgot the way much underestimated small picks set! >> Pratt-Read or Craftsman is a good choice maybe the HF are too, can't say, haven't used those.
    Last edited by kittytrail; 08-07-2014 at 03:23 PM. Reason: wrong link edited for much wow!

  21. #21
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    Here' my basic set up:

    Park tool chain checker, crank puller, chain whip (no shown), cassette socket, peddle wrench, cwn-1 chain ring wrench & ct-5 chain breaker.

    New Topeak chain breaker, performance cable cutter, Allen wrenches, other basic tools, patches, tubes, shock pump, brake & shifter cables, brake pads, chain pins, & tire irons

    The crank wrench is no longer needed. Replaced by torque wrench and Allen sockets. I saw a recent review the $35 harbor freight was more accurate then a $200 snap on wrench. I use a craftsman. I also have a cheap set of spin dr cone (performance) wrenches.

    Sorry about the double pics
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Putting together basic tool kit...What am I missing?-image.jpg  

    Putting together basic tool kit...What am I missing?-image.jpg  

    2012 Specialized Camber Comp 29er
    Trek 9800 OLCV, XT upgrade 26er
    KHS Fleetwood
    Schwinn 20" Fastback 5 speed stick shift

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