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  1. #1
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    Pedros Tulio Skewer Multi-tool

    Anyone have one of these? Is it decent? Does that wrench fall out after heavy riding?
    It looks clever and handy.
    Ride it like you stole it.

  2. #2
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    I have been looking at one myself, seems like it would be useful on my Troll: commuter, grocery, path bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by deano machineo View Post
    Anyone have one of these? Is it decent? Does that wrench fall out after heavy riding?
    It looks clever and handy.
    I'll start by calling out my bias, as I am the engineer who developed the Tulio from prototype to finished product, but, that said. I have ridden numerous iterations of the Tulio since the fall of 2008 on every type of terrain and the tools have never fallen out, even when I was trying to make it happen. My background includes professional downhill racing and various other aggressive styles of riding. Specific Tulio testing occurred in the follow: downhill riding, dirt jumping, aggressive trail riding, road riding, and off-road riding on my road bike (I have a bad tendency to get bored on road rides and wander onto trails).

    Please let me know if I can answer any further questions.

    Would love to hear back from others on their experiences as well. Thanks.

    Jay

  4. #4
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    Well thats neat. Just looked it up.

    It's not for me as I always use a camelbak but a neat design nonetheless.

  5. #5
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    is it just me or is that product just a pos that no one needs? I have some hexes and **** on my "multitool" and wait what else did it do? its a skewer?? Near the wheels? wtf my tools are always clean, i fuc king hate dirty tools, Does it play mp3s?? t6hat would have been a badass feature though! Its some kind of shitty multitool that no one needs thats mounted at the wheels? Only i see something wrong here?

    However I like pedros more than park tool. Park tool, has recently, like the last 10 years become crap. and pedros still make good ****! good, hard, durable steel in the tools! But this one, fukc it!

    Ok i have a product recommendation: the ufo flying flat fixer/lighter/beer opener/crank

    yeah well it would work like this: its magnetically coupled to the bike as a crank and when you wish it to its starts flying using electrogravitic forces, or possibly the fact that the earth is a charged body and use the negative of that or possibly it emits negative gravity, yeah lets just make it emit negative gravity. And then when you think about something whatever vit might be, like i have flat tire, this device automatically reads your mind wireless and flys to fix it, no buttons. whatever it might be, it does it. this is badass technology right here. and also it doubles as a dildo, seat post, skewer, tire and frame.

    And it folds out like a swiss army knife showing off its potential in vegas mode, with leds, lots of them in different colors. also there is a miniature nuclear reactor built in to power it, and that needs its "uraplut" ("the healthy choice") core exchanged every 1000 years. don't forget.

    AND you can light up a spliff on the plutonium powering the device if you like, and it opens beers for you automatically if you have it close enough to melt the glass with the rampage neutrons (closer than 2km) , folds down to just 1x0.5x2 inches, weighing only 2.3 medium size neutron stars.

    Kickass product right there!!
    Last edited by car bone; 09-21-2012 at 01:08 PM. Reason: to add more useless features
    Rule #9 // If you are out riding in bad weather, it means you are a badass. Period.

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    Specialized sucks ass.

  6. #6
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    is it just me or is that product just a pos that no one needs?
    +1

    Just get rid of all that stuff and make the lever a beer bottle opener. Problem solved.
    When the **** did we get ice cream?

  7. #7
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    While all of the above is very constructive and adds to the thread. I think the tool is aimed more towards the minimalist rider and less towards the guy who forgot his bottle opener and dildo.
    Ride it like you stole it.

  8. #8
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    I have always liked the idea of integrating tools into a form that can be easily accessed and kept with the bike. This tool is neatly executed but for me it would be of little use. First off, it is exposed to the elements and will surely get filthy. A dirty chain tool with grit in the threads can be tough to use. Second, I don't like the idea of having to dis-engage the wheel to use it. Third, I own alot of bikes. My multitool stays in my camelback so I have it no matter which bike I ride. I can see how this tool may be great for someone who commutes and does not want to wear a pack though.

    Cannondale had a tool that fit into the oversized headtubes that was pretty cool. I had an old bike that had a pump integrated into the seatpost but you had to take the seat off to pump up the tire.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhmtbj View Post
    Please let me know if I can answer any further questions.

    Jay
    Jay, is the Tulio 99G weight including the skewer? If so,what is the approx weight without the skewer? It looks like a pretty affordable lightweight well packaged tool just to carry in your pocket. My racing bike this year has a rear thru axel. I'm assuming one of the reasons you chose the rear axel is because so many fronts have thru axels?

    I'm a bit concerned about how usable the allen wrenches are, and that it doesn't have some of the smaller ones. One of the reasons I've gone with the Topeak Hexus (original version,new version has problems) is it has all the tools, many long, and I find I used it for most home shop repairs too. But at over 180g I know I could save 100g by getting Leyzne's expensive Carbon 10. The tulio could be a compromise.

    I always ride with a single Pedro's lever, which has never failed with my Stan's or Roval rims and various tires. I like the idea of a multitool designed around the lever. Is the Tulio robust and easy to use as your regular levers? The Hexus levers are too small to use individually like the pedros lever. The Leyzne doesn't have one.

    I have a few tool ideas of my own I'd like to start working on

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by thegallery View Post
    Jay, is the Tulio 99G weight including the skewer? If so,what is the approx weight without the skewer? It looks like a pretty affordable lightweight well packaged tool just to carry in your pocket. My racing bike this year has a rear thru axel. I'm assuming one of the reasons you chose the rear axel is because so many fronts have thru axels?

    I'm a bit concerned about how usable the allen wrenches are, and that it doesn't have some of the smaller ones. One of the reasons I've gone with the Topeak Hexus (original version,new version has problems) is it has all the tools, many long, and I find I used it for most home shop repairs too. But at over 180g I know I could save 100g by getting Leyzne's expensive Carbon 10. The tulio could be a compromise.

    I always ride with a single Pedro's lever, which has never failed with my Stan's or Roval rims and various tires. I like the idea of a multitool designed around the lever. Is the Tulio robust and easy to use as your regular levers? The Hexus levers are too small to use individually like the pedros lever. The Leyzne doesn't have one.

    I have a few tool ideas of my own I'd like to start working on
    Weight of the multi-tool/QR Lever body portion is 58 grams making it one of the lightest multi-tool options available. If you use it as a skewer as intended the total weight is only about 40 grams more than a typical steel skewer with aluminum lever body.

    I've used the Tulio a few times as a stand-alone multi-tool as well when on a vacation where our bikes were cruiser style and didn't have QR wheels and I found the tool to work well in this way. It is very compact, lightweight, and ergonomic in use.

    Generally speaking we and all reviewers have found the hex wrench functionality to be fantastic and the shape of the body has great ergonomics in you hand and provides a good handle to generate leverage. The body is also much narrower than a typical multitool making fit better than many typical folding multitools that are too wide to allow good rotation. As with any multi-tool, the Tulio does have some limitations but the design principle we followed was to provide tools needed to fix critical problems that would otherwise end your ride.

    I'm a bit confused about your comments regarding the Tulio being used as a tire lever. This is not one of the functions and we would suggest you continue to carry your Pedro's tire lever. In a pinch, however, when running the Tulio with it's QR Skewer, we've found that the skewer rod can work as a tire lever by positioning the fixed nut (exposed when the Tool is removed from the skewer) under the bead of the tire.

    Take a look at the Tulio User Manual here for full info: http://www.pedros.com/Tulio%20User%20Manual.pdf

    Additionally, you can check out a few reviews here:
    Review: Pedro's Tulio, the awesome multitool - Divide Bound
    Pedro's Tülio QR Multitool Review - BikeRadar

    Thanks for your interest!

    Jay

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhmtbj View Post
    Weight of the multi-tool/QR Lever body portion is 58 grams making it one of the lightest multi-tool options available.

    ...


    Thanks for your interest!

    Jay
    Jay, I'm sold! I'll try it as my light weight race tool!

    Yeah somewhere I saw specs that said it included a lever too, and that confused myself as I didn't see how!

    With a thru axel rear on my main race bike I will just be carrying the Tulio in my pocket.

    But there are defiantly weight weenies like me looking for the ultimate gram-saving emergency tool. Right now, if you want a chain breaker too, that seems to be the 80g Leyzne Carbon 10. Really nice; but super expensive, and no lever either. Essentially the Tulio half's the weight and the cost. There are some other light and affordable designs out there besides, but the Tulio is definitely a departure from most others.

    I could see perhaps a non-skewer version with the an end sticking out the same shape as the classic Pedro's lever?..

  12. #12
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    I have a cruiser bicycle before and this multitool works best for me. I don't have to carry a lot of wrenches that I need. The unique sliding socket-head selector allows me to quickly get the size I need.

  13. #13
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    Re: Pedros Tulio Skewer Multi-tool

    I have.been using mine for.a 2 month. You.have to make sure the lever is orientated right.or. a piece.of tool has.dropped. on me when I had it oriented the wrong way.

    Haven't used the chain break, but have. Used the other functions.

    The.smallest.hex.is 4mm. .since its very light, especially subtracting skewer weight, it is very good. Gram to.cost savings. Imho ingenious design. I wish I would have not pirchased my larger crankbro tool

    update: I used the chainbreak this weekend. Worked much nicer than my crankbrothers one. Went through first xc race at sea otter, large fall, a tumbling bike, tool stayed together.
    Last edited by bob13bob; 04-22-2013 at 01:37 PM.

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