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  1. #1
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    Park ts-8, how do you do vertical true on it?


  2. #2
    g3h6o3
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    You have a reference point so you use it for radial true, just like lateral true...
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  3. #3
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    Honestly, I'm not a big fan of vertical truing. What makes a wheel strong is even and high spoke tension. For me, adjusting the vertical true of a wheel simply requires too much compromise in the even tension of a properly built wheel. If the wheel is only slightly out of true vertically, then just ignore it since you won't feel it. If it's out of true by a lot it's time to replace the rim.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Check out the owner's manual on the Park Tool website, Park Tool Co. TS-8 : Home Mechanic Wheel Truing Stand : Wheel Truing Stands and Accessories . Radial true is covered in the fourth paragraph down.

    I respectfully disagree with bad mechanic however. Radial true is an important part of building a proper wheel. But it is like truing a wheel laterally, spoke tensions need to be monitored etc. And the same rules apply, if repairing a lateral wobble requires adjustment that takes the spokes involved too far out of the correct tension range, then the wheel becomes unstable and should be replaced. Same with radial truing. And radial true is often an indicator of proper spoke tension as well. As an example, I had a customer come into the shop with a wheel set that he had purchased from an online retailer. The wheels were laterally true, but radial was off to the point you could see it by simply spinning the wheel and observing by eye. A tension check showed a range of 15% from lowest to highest. Not acceptable in my book. A careful radial true and frequent tension check resulted in a wheel set that was radially true to .05mm and a tension range that was 5% from lowest to highest per side. This was a new wheel set of course. An older used set I would have and done the best I could with the true, but the main focus would have been equalizing the tensions.

    The bottom line is, tension and true are a balancing act. The act becomes more critical when you're talking a wheel with some miles on it. You need to know when to leave well enough alone and live with it, and when to give it up and replace the wheel.

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  5. #5
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    In some ways I think Squash and I are saying the same thing. Correct and equal spoke tension will yield an almost perfectly true wheel to the point, in my opinion, that truing it vertically isn't worth it, and getting a wheel into true at the cost of grossly unequal spoke tension results in an unstable wheel which will soon die.

  6. #6
    g3h6o3
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    Totally agree with Squash and bad mech. With even tensions on a straight rim, you'll end up with a good enough lateral and radial true 99% of the time.

    Radial true is something I never had to pay attention to and the only time I noticed a "radial true" problem was on my road bike when my tire bead has slipped creating a big bulge on my front wheel.
    Last edited by PissedOffCil; 08-23-2012 at 02:04 PM.
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  7. #7
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    If the wheel is built properly from the start then it is usually within limits at the end, regardless.

  8. #8
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    Is the ts2.2 worth the cost over the ts8?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Is the ts2.2 worth the cost over the ts8?
    It can be if your going to true a lot of wheels or use it frequently. Or if the ability to true both directions laterallly without removing the wheel is that important to you. Your call on that one. The 2.2 is a bit quicker to set up and use, but the TS8 will do everything the 2.2 will do.

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  10. #10
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    Is that centering gauge even worth the money? Should I just get a dishing gauge?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Is that centering gauge even worth the money? Should I just get a dishing gauge?
    It depends. If you want to use the TS2 or 2.2 to dish wheels then yes. You have to make sure that the calipers are properly centered independent of a possibly improperly dished wheel. However, I think it's faster and more accurate to use a dishing tool like the DS4 or 5. A dishing tool is also faster for simply checking the dish of a wheel, you don't have to fiddle with the gauge and stand. Just pop the tool on the wheel, set the caliper to one side then switch and check the other side. But unless you are actually building wheels a dishing gauge isn't something that you should have to use that often. The dish of a properly built wheel should never change. If it does you have some serious issues with the wheel. But either option will work. If being accurate is important then get the dishing tool.

    Good Dirt
    "I do whatever my Rice Cripsies tell me to!"

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