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  1. #1
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    Need help for Hub bearing puller

    hey folks i am at my wits end.. i tot i could do it and do my own search to find a bearing puller but i can't i do not know which one to choose. Can someone advise me what is a affordable hub bearing puller that u can recommend to me?

  2. #2
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    What kind of hubs are they?
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  3. #3
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    thanks, I got syncros fr hubs with sealed bearings

  4. #4
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    I tried searching and came up with bupkiss too
    hopefully someone with experience with these hubs will chime in.
    sorry man
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  5. #5
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    if you can access the bearings enough to pull them, you should also be able to see the model of the bearing. something like a 6803 or maybe an rs6803 on the side of them. that number will give you the I.D. to select your puller.

  6. #6
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    I've got specific pullers for the bearings I need 'em for, but don't they generally get rated by the ID as well?

    I've been able to simply tap them out of some Spot hubs I didn't have the specific tool for...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  7. #7
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    Bikin' raises a good point... are you simply replacing the bearings? If so just tap 'em out w/ a screwdriver and hammer or for more fun a jackhammer .. yeah!!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  8. #8
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    This one is overpriced but you can find something similar. Would work for all but the smallest (i.e. horst-link) bearings on most bikes:

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Motor...Q5fAccessories

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    thanks highdell, bhd, biki, waved.

    yes the blind bearing puller is what i will buy! the collet size would be a range from 8mm - 25mm. but its not cheap...

    I found www.enduroforkseals.com do have decent puller and press but its a shop quality cost..

    i did some tapping on my previous hubs. to push the bearing out but the hub body is the irreplacable part of the hub.. so a tapping mistake could cost me unneccesary cost eg. new hub, rebuild costs etc.. but yes i have 3 fullies and 5 wheelsets. so getting a puller/removal does make sense to home repairs. since i got cheap skf bearings access!

    but yes thanks a lot for the help. blind bearing puller is what i will buy. Next find: a decent affordable bearing press

  10. #10
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    Jhanney, I dunno if you've seen this, but I came across it while looking for a puller for you - I think it looks pretty classy with the wood organizer.


    from Synchros Blog - where I found it originally.

    and

    The actual page at Wheels Manufacturing
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    hey highdell, OMG its a very very good find! thanks for the help!
    can put that in my list of presses... now i am trying to get the prices!

  12. #12
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    http://www.harborcountrybike.com/product_p/tool2270.htm

    wow.. usd247.. i think i will pass on this one...sigh..

  13. #13
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    Man! that's steep!

    It'd be awesome if somehow you found it cheaper...It sure did look nice tho - oh well
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
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    I found this at Universal Cycles for $95 (is that about the price range you are looking for?)


    I don't know about the quick-release tho (seems like it could be problematic - i don't know)...possibly do the all thread and nuts/washers route...?

    If I find anything else later, I'll post it up
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  15. #15
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    yo! thats the ideal bearing press. checking eastonbikes.com online, i found they recommended pressing their hub bearings using a qr with say a large diameter socket. i did that once.. and had a massive problem. u have to screw it tighter, use the qr to leverage and so on.. but guess what happened? when unscrewing it out, the qr handle end came loose from the 9mm rod when turning it round. i had to saw the socket and the qr to release the entire attachement.. i wun go the qr way....

  16. #16
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    hahaha sorry the ideal bearing press line was meant for the one u found earlier the wheels manufacturing one

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhanney
    ...pressing their hub bearings using a qr with say a large diameter socket. i did that once.. and had a massive problem. u have to screw it tighter, use the qr to leverage and so on....
    haha,,, that's what I suspected would be the problem...there just doesn't seem to have enough throw or strength to do the job right!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  18. #18
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    http://www.ventanausa.com/images/Bearingpresstool.jpg

    not sure if it'll work for you, but a good excuse to buy a ventana in the future...

  19. #19
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    You can do your own bearing press, too, with a simple threaded rod and nuts and washers or sockets (even using your old bearings).
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  20. #20
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    Has anyone made their own bearing press, puller before with the method mentioned above? (Threaded rod) Anyone have an idea about making a bearing puller? Does this mark up the bearing in a way that would affect any of the races?
    "Worrying does not empty tomorrow of its troubles...it empties today of its strength."

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jennifer_06
    Has anyone made their own bearing press, puller before with the method mentioned above? (Threaded rod) Anyone have an idea about making a bearing puller? Does this mark up the bearing in a way that would affect any of the races?
    Pressing a bearing is a lot different than pulling in many cases, lots harder to diy a puller...
    "...the people get the government they deserve..."
    suum quique

  22. #22
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    specialized makes a very nice bearing puller/press kit ofr their FSR bikes. good luck getting a shop to sell you one.

    otherwise i DIY puller shouldn't be that hard. i'm sure i could make one, i'm in the process of making one for fork bushings.

  23. #23
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    yo folks! thanks for the advice. I will hunt for a cheaper blind bearing remover. it seems the only way to go for pulling bearings out of hubs

  24. #24
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    Are the bearings you're pulling blind?

    You don't really need a bearing press. Take the old bearing, lay it on top of the new bearing, and wrap tape along the outer race to fasten them together. Now use a hammer with a light touch on the old bearing to drive the new bearing into place. As the new bearing slides into place, the tape will simply be pushed off it.

  25. #25
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    My thanks to the OP for starting this thread, because I've just discovered that I have a bad bearing. I want to learn how to replace them myself.

    I have a question about the following, blind puller:

    http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id197.html

    Look at the final photo on the above page. It appears that the collet pulls against the inner bearing race. Would that not tend to damage the bearing? Is there an advantage to using a blind puller over just hammering out the bearings by hammering against the axle? (I would use a plastic mallet, of course, not a metal hammer).

  26. #26
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    bad mechanic, yes the bearings i want to work on are sealed bearings in the hubs and freewheel

    JonathanGennick, actually a hammer and mallet will do.. the fact is u are pulling a spoilt bearing means you do not want to reuse the bearing anymore. means regardless of mallet or pulling, the bearing will suffer some sort of damage.
    fresh bearings always brings some new life to your ride.

    the difference i notice and read is preventing damage to your hub body. you can be real careful 99% but the one percent you are not, hub body gets damage. but i am not too sure what damage to the hub body will affect the overall wheel.

    But having a bearing puller is useful when you are replacing pivot bearings, hub bearings.that is the reason for me doing so. Its not neccessary but its something i won't mind spending some money on.it costs a bit so i am trying to make sure i get the right tools.

  27. #27
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    Thanks Jhanney. Your explanation makes sense. I hadn't realized there was risk to the hub from the hammer-the-axle method. And having a puller for when I (someday) replace my pivot bearings is probably a good idea. It's depressing how expensive some of these tools are though.

  28. #28
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    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...112&zmap=95987
    i was searching and searching and found this. need to purchase the 8mm collets though.. sadly i live abroad so they dun ship to where i stay.. damn it

  29. #29
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    searched for blind hole bearing puller on ebay..

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhanney
    the difference i notice and read is preventing damage to your hub body. you can be real careful 99% but the one percent you are not, hub body gets damage.
    If you aren't stupid about the tools you use, then you're not going to damage the hub. Use a long, round punch of sufficient diameter to hammer the old bearing out. Do NOT use a screwdriver to do it. Unless you do something really stupid, you won't damage anything. I've done it this way on my bicycle and my motorcycle for as long as I can remember. You really only need a blind bearing puller if you have no access to the back of the bearing.

  31. #31
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    Hi gang. I'm new around here. This forum is awsome, and filled with lots of info.
    I just thought I'd share a bearing removal method that has always helped me.

    If the part is all metal (or has high-heat plastic bits involved), warm the part by baking it in an oven (I have an stove/oven in the shop, for industrial use), at about 200 degrees forr around 10-min. The press-fits relax from the material expantion, and the bearings nearly fall out. Same method for putting in the new bearings; however, you'll need to repack the new bearings with a heat-withstanding grease (I use high-grade silicone greases / lubes), so the heat from the instalation, doesn't melt out the lesser grade shipping grease.


  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by greywitch
    Hi gang. I'm new around here. This forum is awsome, and filled with lots of info.
    I just thought I'd share a bearing removal method that has always helped me.

    If the part is all metal (or has high-heat plastic bits involved), warm the part by baking it in an oven (I have an stove/oven in the shop, for industrial use), at about 200 degrees forr around 10-min. The press-fits relax from the material expantion, and the bearings nearly fall out. Same method for putting in the new bearings; however, you'll need to repack the new bearings with a heat-withstanding grease (I use high-grade silicone greases / lubes), so the heat from the instalation, doesn't melt out the lesser grade shipping grease.

    Is there any danger of effecting the metal's heat treating by doing this?

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Is there any danger of effecting the metal's heat treating by doing this?
    I wouldn't think so. 200 degrees is pretty cool compared to heat treating or even powder coating.
    Are hubs even heat treated? (i don't see why they would be)
    Another thing you can do along with heating, is to freeze the bearing/s (that may also eliminate the need for high-temp grease)

    nice approach tho!
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    I wouldn't think so. 200 degrees is pretty cool compared to heat treating or even powder coating.
    Are hubs even heat treated? (i don't see why they would be)
    Another thing you can do along with heating, is to freeze the bearing/s (that may also eliminate the need for high-temp grease)

    nice approach tho!
    Throwing bearings in the freezer is something I do regularly, since most of the parts (motorcycle) won't fit in my oven. In fact, the last time I used my oven was to heat mold some snowboard boots...yeah, I love being a bachelor.

    You're right. I thought aluminum was annealed at a pretty low temperature, but after looking it up, it's still three times higher than what you're talking about. I'm pretty sure hubs are heat treated.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    .. I'm pretty sure hubs are heat treated.
    You might very well be correct. I don't claim to know very much about making hubs
    I suppose it could depend on the method - machined (linear grained) vs. cold forged (compressed grained) <~~ not even sure I'm using the correct terminology
    Honestly... ahh I give up

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    No.

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