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  1. #1
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    MTB disassembly tools kit

    Hi guys and gals, I'm in the process of swapping all of my specialized components to a different frame. I work on my own cars, boat's jet ski's and everything else, so I have a bunch of really nice tools, I actually have 2, 4 feet by about 6 feet high tool boxes, o you can get the idea of how many tools I have. My question is, what are all of the other tools needed to do a complete disassemble of my MTB?

    This will be my first time doing this so I have no clue what should I get, I guess I need tools for the cassette, BB, center lock disc tool, chain etc...

    What else???

    Do I need a special tools to remove the fork, cranks. What other tools I might need to do the job?

    Also, what grease should I use to grease up everything on the bike?

    What other things you guys think I should need to do to the bike while swapping everything?

    I'm going to try to do all the tuning/adjustments my self, if I'm not successful I will take it to LBS, but this is after I try all the info gathered on the net.

    Thanks in advance for any help .

  2. #2
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    BTW, is eBay the best place to get all this tools that I'll be getting?

  3. #3
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    Unless your other frame is also a Specialized of similar vintage, you may be surprised how many components aren't swappable: seatpost size, front derailleurs, bottom brackets and cranks, fork (straight versus taper), hub and axle sizes could all be different.

    This is a good reference for bike service Park Tool Co. ParkTool Blog

    ...and just like buying mechanic's tools, there's a reason that Snap-On and Craftsman cost more. Same with bike tools. Park Tools and Pedros tend to be better quality than all the cheap Asian versions.

    Have a look through some of these tool kits to get a sense of commonly used bike tools. Like any kit, they will contain the stuff you need every day and the things you need maybe once a year, but it depends on how far you want to go in being equipped. The smaller kits don't tend to have the bike frame prep tools like facing and reaming/thread chasing tools you might need to prepare a new frame for assembly.

    Park Tool Co.
    PEDRO'S NA | Innovative Bicycle Maintenance | Bench Tools
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  4. #4
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    Thanks for replying, I will looks at those links shortly. Both bikes are specialized, one is a stumpjumper 04 model and the other is a s work fsr 03 model. I compared them on their website and everything was the same, just better components (xtr's) on the fsr.
    I hope I don't have to buy anything else (components), but if I have to I hope I don't have to buy the expensive ones.
    Basically all of my tools are craftsman, but I use them a lot. I know I wont be using this bike tools a lot so I'm not looking for great tools. On 7 years using this bike this is the first time I have to remove things.
    Instead of paying someone I prefer to buy the tools and do all my things, that way I have the tools in case I need them again in the future.

  5. #5
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    I was in your same situation back in September. I had plenty of tools but no bike specific tools. I bought a Nashbar bike tool kit and a Feedback stand off Amazon and got a pretty good deal on both. I also bought the Zin mountain bike repair book which is a good resource when I'm not around my computer. I have been happy with everything and have learned a lot. I think messing with my bikes is just as much of a hobby as riding them. Have fun with it!

  6. #6
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    Pretty much the only thing you'll need aside from standard screwdrivers and hex wrenches (metric), are something to remove the cassette from the rear wheel (chain whip/cassette lockring tool) and something to remove the bottom bracket (splined bottom bracket tool). If you are switching headsets, you'll need a cup removal tool. The crown race can be removed from the fork gingerly with a screwdriver, punch, and hammer, and installed with a length of pipe banged down on the flats of the race. (though there is a tool specifically made for this, as well as installation).

    You can even skip the chain whip by using a length of chain looped around the cog and clamped in a vise. Likewise, many tools can be improvised if you aren't doing something super precise (like facing tabs/posts, reaming the headtube, etc.)

  7. #7
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    Thanks man, could you please tell me which tool set did you buy, since it worked for you and you were in my same situation I believe this should work for me too.

    I was looking at this book Park Tool BBB-2 The Big Blue Book of Bicycle Repair - 2nd Edition: Calvin Jones: 0763477000262: Amazon.com: Books
    Quote Originally Posted by needajob View Post
    I was in your same situation back in September. I had plenty of tools but no bike specific tools. I bought a Nashbar bike tool kit and a Feedback stand off Amazon and got a pretty good deal on both. I also bought the Zin mountain bike repair book which is a good resource when I'm not around my computer. I have been happy with everything and have learned a lot. I think messing with my bikes is just as much of a hobby as riding them. Have fun with it!

  8. #8
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    Thanks wschruba, that's what I wanted to know, the specific tools for the whole job.

    Also what lubricants I'm suppose to use now that I'll have everything out of the bike, like grease or what?

    Like 20 years ago I used to disassemble my whole bmx an I use to lubricate everything but can't remember what I used at that time.

    Now I'm thinking hard on just getting all the components and leave my other specialized alone and build this fsr frame.

  9. #9
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    If you have anti-seize, that's the best to use on threaded components (brake components get threadlocker). Grease on press-fit surfaces (the headset cups). Grease the seatpost if it's metal, or carbon prep if it's carbon.

    I prefer white lithium preparations as far as grease goes, but you can really use any mid-weight stuff you have around

    The chain can be lubricated with any number of chain oils, which, if of the lighter variety, can also be used on derailleur pivots, in sticky/crudded up cable housing, and on spoke nipples prior to truing the wheel.

  10. #10
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    I have no idea how the head set is attached, but as far as swapping everything, the only specialty tool you should need is a Bottom Bracket tool. The cassette will stay on the wheel since I'm guessing you're using your old ones. Everything else should be standard tools like screwdrivers, allen wrenches and other standard tools. Oh, probably also need a chain tool.

    As far as the headset, depending on what it entails, you may just wanna take both frames to the shop and have them do it quick. I know my shop, (I just got back into biking so Im not a regular) when I bought the wrong cassette tool, he offered to just quick spin the nut off for me. So depending on your shop the price may not be too bad.

    I know what you mean about wanting to do it yourself, I too just bought a bunch of specialty tools to completely disassemble my bike, but to be able to "rebuild/clean". Although with some things like facing head tubes or what ever else would need to be done on newer bikes, Id leave that to the shop.

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