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  1. #1
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    how to get a very tight old school cartridge bottom bracket out?

    So does anyone have any magical tips for removing a old cartridge style bottom bracket? It's obviously not been removed for a while and i've had a little go with the appropriate tool but its starting to chew it out. So any ideas, thanks in advance

  2. #2
    ...idios...
    Reputation: SteveUK's Avatar
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    You are remembering that the drive-side is opposite thread? Right to loosen.

    And welcome to MTBR!!

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  3. #3
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    Depending on your bottom bracket tool, you may be able to run the crank arm bolt through the tool to the spindle to hold the tool in place and keep it from jumping out of the splines. This helps a bunch with a super tight BB.

  4. #4
    bikexor
    Reputation: derockus's Avatar
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    DOUSE it in PB Blaster or Liquid Wrench... get it all up in there from the inside through the hole in the bottom of the BB where the cable guide screws in.

    And follow SteveUK's advice too.
    Little Shred Riding Hood

  5. #5
    ~Disc~Golf~
    Reputation: highdelll's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by derockus
    ... get it all up in there from the inside through the hole in the bottom of the BB where the cable guide screws in.
    that IS old school
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  6. #6
    bikexor
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    that IS old school
    Haha, yeah, can you tell I've done it before?
    Little Shred Riding Hood

  7. #7
    Known Mountainbiker
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    Clamp the tool in a vise and turn the frame. Much more leverage.

    Caz
    I am a Mountain Biker therefore I am late

  8. #8
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    Hmm thanks everyone, i was turning it the right way its just an oldish bike (10 years) which still has the orginal BB in it. Might try the vice idea or see what the LBS mech can do, thanks again everyone

  9. #9
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    Install the BB tool, then put a bolt through the tool and thread it into the BB spindle; tighten it down. Now place an adjustable or box wrench on the BB tool, use a breaker bar if necessary, and go to town. Make sure you're turning it clockwise if it's on the drive train side.

  10. #10
    EDR
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    I've used the vise as well.

    With the tool in the vise and using the frame as leverage it will come right off, ...or break trying.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by eatdrinkride
    I've used the vise as well.

    With the tool in the vise and using the frame as leverage it will come right off, ...or break trying.
    It's a great way to get a lot of leverage, but be sure to use a bolt to fix the tool to the BB, otherwise it's a very easy way to make the tool slip and damage the BB further.

  12. #12
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    Try some heat, using a hair dryer or heat gun, not a torch. Also bang on the BB spindle with a hammer a few times. The vibration will help penetrants work into the threads and shift the crud a little. I have not tried this with a BB but these are good general tricks for stuck stuff.
    2009 Redline Conquest Pro, 2008 Trek Fuel Ex8
    2007 Kona Cinder Cone utility bike
    Yes I spent too much on bikes.

  13. #13
    Extra Crispy
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    It's a great way to get a lot of leverage, but be sure to use a bolt to fix the tool to the BB, otherwise it's a very easy way to make the tool slip and damage the BB further.
    And damage yourself when the tool slips off and you go flying because you were playing tug-of-war with the vice.
    Now with eggs.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bacon11
    And damage yourself when the tool slips off and you go flying because you were playing tug-of-war with the vice.
    Word.

  15. #15
    Pretty in Pink
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    I have had the same issue, ended up low heat welding a big old nut it, then just spin er right off with a 1/2" drive. Obviously only do this if you are replacing it anyway.
    "There are two ways of spreading light ...
    To be the candle, or the mirror that reflects it."
    ~ Edith Wharton ~

  16. #16
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    Hey everyone thanks for the ideas, the lbs mech got it off in the end using a better (tighter fitting tool) and some more leverage. So all good now.

  17. #17
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    In the future, try PB Blaster... that sh*ts amazing... works 1000 times better than WD-40 or Liquid Mess.

  18. #18
    nachos rule!
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    my worst case solution is to whip out the air compressor and impact driver.
    plus a change, plus c'est la m'me chose - alphonse karr

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