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Thread: Hanging bike.

  1. #1
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Hanging bike.

    I just had a look in the "The "What's your shop look like?" thread" and you guys really have some nice setups. One thing that baffles me is that almost none of you have a setup where you hang the bike from the ceiling when you tinker with your bikes. Work stands seems to be the name of the game for you guys, but I can't help thinking about how low the bike is mounted and how it looks like you have to be crawling on your knees almost to get to the rear shifter and stuff like that.

    I rarely ever see anyone using a work stand in my country, almost every LBS has ceiling mounted lifts where you hang the bike from the handlebars and seat. Some are very basic, fixed height setups, the LBS I worked for had a height adjustable setup with pneumatics.

    My home setup is very basic too. I have a couple of hooks in the ceiling of my basement and a couple of chains with hooks to use when tinkering with my bikes. I can somewhat adjust the height by choosing which link in the chain to use. It's super simple, very cheap and gives great access to tinkering with the bike without having to crouch down or crawl around. When I don't use them I keep the chains in a drawer so I don't hit my head on them.

    My $10 setup:
    Hanging bike.-kroge.jpg

    Hanging bike.-konaunit.jpg

    The perfect height for tinkering with bikes and you can walk around the bike if needed (from the internet):
    Hanging bike.-5528553-mere-plads-til-begejstring-1.jpg

    To me a work stand looks like a great portable option for a quick fix at the parking lot before a ride, but for working at home the ceiling hooks are so easy to use, great for ergonomics and easy access to the bike that I'm amazed it hasn't caught on on your side of the pond.

  2. #2
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    Clamping the frame into a stand is necessary whenever you need to apply any torque, hammer at something, etc. Most quality stands can telescope up and down, and have jaws that rotate so you can flip the bike upside down, vertical, whatever. Crouching and crawling around to access the bottom of the bike is just bad body mechanics. Lift the bike up to proper working height and save your back!

    Hanging the bike is a fine solution if you don't have a stand, but it's certainly no replacement.
    Loud hubs save lives. http://about.me/splat/

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by splatworldwide View Post
    Clamping the frame into a stand is necessary whenever you need to apply any torque, hammer at something, etc. Most quality stands can telescope up and down, and have jaws that rotate so you can flip the bike upside down, vertical, whatever. Crouching and crawling around to access the bottom of the bike is just bad body mechanics. Lift the bike up to proper working height and save your back!

    Hanging the bike is a fine solution if you don't have a stand, but it's certainly no replacement.

    ^^Was just about to make the exact same post.

    I couldn't imagine doing a complete service with the bike swinging around like that, and no option to work on the headset, stem, or bars. Once you get used to something like a Park PRS-3 (extra tall) where you can pivot the bike around where you want and lock it down solidly it's hard to go back. It does cost a lot more than $10 though.

  4. #4
    The Wiking
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    Hej Sandrenser.... har du nogensinde prÝvet en stand?
    ---

    Hooks are fine, and easy to use on smaller adjustments, but I prefer my repairstand over hooks any day... Growing up I used in my old mans shop, but was handed down a repairstand, and I can hands down, say that its WAY better... The clamp swivels, which is excellent for bleeding brakes, or adjusting rearderaileur etc... Also the hooks doesnt work well with every type of stem og saddle..
    with speed, shall technique be conquered

    The streets are the sketchiest of trails.

  5. #5
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Working on stems, headset or bars are no problem, just get a leather strap like a dog collar and use that to hang the bike through the frame when you can't hang the bike from the stem or saddle. A strap like that is useful too if the stem or bars are crowded.

    As for torque work it's just a matter of technique. I've replaced crank/hub bearings on a bike hanging from "bouncy" nylon robes just fine, it's just a matter of angles.

    I haven't tried a work stand, it might be the greatest thing since sliced bread. I'm not trying to convince anyone to give up their work stands either, I'm just curious why something as simple as hanging the bike hasn't really caught on with you guys. The only LBS's I've seen use a work stand are those with very high ceilings, everyone else seems to use hanging bikes, it's pretty much the industry standard where I live.

  6. #6
    The Wiking
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    stands take up floorspace, most danish bikeshops are rather small.. stands are expensive and require lifting of sometimes heavy bikes in one arm to operate the clamp etc.. hooks can be done one end at a time..

    My current shop doesn't offer space enough to hang the bikes, so often i'm mending the bike outside or in the living room... the livingroom ceiling would not look good with hooks for bikehanging and i'm not well enough connected nor do i have chains long enough to hang my bike outside..
    with speed, shall technique be conquered

    The streets are the sketchiest of trails.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ranger Radon View Post
    stands take up floorspace, most danish bikeshops are rather small.. stands are expensive and require lifting of sometimes heavy bikes in one arm to operate the clamp etc.. hooks can be done one end at a time..

    I haven't used too many portable stands but with the Park you put the clamp on the bike first and then use both arms to lift it on the stand. I opened a shop many years ago that was in a tiny space and still managed a decent work a area, the only extra room the stand took up was basically a 3 inch diameter steel pole which was handy to lean things against when not in use, which was rare.

    I'm not knocking the hooks for a inexpensive and easy to raise a bike and do simple repairs, but I wouldn't want to use them if I was doing a lot of work, or working professionally.

  8. #8
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    Where are you guys from?

    I was in Nepal from mid-March to first of August in the Terai near Chitwan National park if you want to look it up. The area north of the Indian border is still India geographacally for 25 miles or so, i.e. the Indian plain. I bought a single speed because I created a small breeze for the same energy as walking. We had about 10 days in a row of 110 f heat.

    To say the local shop was basic overstates the setup. I hated to hand a shopkeeper $5.00 (equivalent) because I didn't know if he would have change. Cycling can be an expensive hobby and Americans would tend to have the money to have expensive tools for their expensive toys. But the pictures posted don't look exactly third world.

    Care to share the cultural forces that would cause LBS to hang a bike as a workstand. Not trying to be insensitive, just curious. Of the few places that I've been, good equipment could be found in Kathmandu, but only to a higher midrange bikes. Chang Mai, Thailand had a pro shop with a Merkx in stock while I was there.

  9. #9
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    That is what I do, I have a nice stand that I almost never use, instead I have a Kevlar road bike tire and I hang the bike from the saddle (never found any damage to them and I'm been doing this for years)



    Two hooks if I want it "Stable", one hook if I want to rotate the frame around..


    I also build a bunch of "work stands" (12 of them for bike classes) for a co-op in Berkeley where we use three straps (handlebar, saddle, and from the floor a bottom bracket strap) but sorry I don't have pictures of that..
    Last edited by patineto; 02-15-2013 at 08:13 PM.

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