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  1. #1
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    Hands on maintenance class at LBS?

    LBS by me has a 2 night 6 hour course on bike building and repair. $250, includes Park sk1 kit ($125 value, Park big blue book $25 value). First night, each person assembles there own mtn bike right out of box. And no you dont get to keep it. Bearing adjustments,brake and gear cables,wheel truing. Night two bring in your own bike for full tune up and any questions on anything. All hands on with complete support from mechanics. I know an ok amount but far from everything. Seem worth it, anyone ever take course similar? Thanks.

  2. #2
    Plays with tools
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    I've taught them before. It typically goes pretty well and leaves the students with a good foundation for knowledge, but obviously lacks the repetition for a firm understanding. It's also highly dependant on the teacher. You'll need a good mechanic who is also a decent teacher, neither of which is guaranteed at your lbs.
    Last edited by customfab; 01-14-2014 at 01:40 PM.

  3. #3
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    So basically you are paying the LBS $100 to assemble under supervision a bike for them, that they will in turn sell to the next guy who comes in the door.

    This is much the way luthier "schools" are run and its a load of crap. That school also means squat to us real luthiers and successful shop owners, in fact we view it as a detriment. If you want a real education you apprentice for a very long time. Which yes, you also pay for, but you are actually learning how to understand something vs. getting training to complete a task.

    Granted, there is a huge gulf between what is required to be a master luthier vs. what it takes to wrench on a bike, but the principle involved is exactly the same, just on a different scale.

    Buy the tools and book from them by all means if you like the guys, but there is no extremely broad, bordering on esoteric knowledge required to assemble and tune a bike to perfection, you don't even have to know how to ride to do it. It's something even the laziest autodidact could manage in an afternoon of reading this very forum and watching a half dozen youtube videos.

    So my vote is no on that one, I hope I have helped.

  4. #4
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    Musikron I totally get what youre saying, apprentice is not an option and neither is spending hours wrenching and figuring out what works and what doesnt. I have a crappy work schedule and like most 2ltwo little kids who take up any remainding time( not complaining about them just stating). I guess in my situation I figured I might be able to pick up a thing or two in a short period of time. I would love to understand how things work as apposed to just completing a task. Makes the whole process easier to understand, being able to pinpoint issues... I think I'll go the route of purchasing the book seperate and reading and researching first. Mechanically Im very inclined just never really had the opportunity to learn more of the advanced skills and maintanence on bikes. Thanks for feedback, appreciate the help. Oh yeah, any books you would recommend besides the big blue book?

  5. #5
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    It's not necessarily an all bad thing. I know a shop that did similar and they used the bikes as retails. ya you're still building them a bike but they are teaching multiple people so having a single bike style/parts makes that 1st step better for both the students and the teacher..

    notice there is a 2nd night where you bring your own bike in.. which can cost 1/2 the money you are spending anyway. The tools and book are 150 so you're only really paying 100 for the class, though I'm sure they are profiting off the book and tools also as I see the kit around the web for 80-100 and even that seems high for what you get to me, but that's what a shop does, if they didn't make money they wouldn't be there.

    6 hrs (guessing that's total, 3 a night?) for that kinda help isn't all bad... you'd pay that to bring it to the shop to get fixed if you didn't know how anyway...

    I feel it's a bit high priced, but not completely out of scope.. it's more a "is it worth it to you" deal... if you want to do it, go for it... I can't imagine you'll come out of it completely empty..
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  6. #6
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    I think it depends on what they allow for the "full tune up" on your personal bike. If it's broken up into 3 hours per night...that only leaves you 3 hours for working on your personal bike, which isn't a lot of time for a non-experienced mechanic to do a full blown tune up on their bike. Personally, I would be more inclined to pay the money if it meant getting walked through a tune up on my personal bike for the entire 6 hours instead of spending half the time building a bike out of a box.

    However, $100 isn't bad to get some hands-on tutorials on fixing things on your bike...especially if your bike is in need of tune up.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by musikron View Post
    So basically you are paying the LBS $100 to assemble under supervision a bike for them, that they will in turn sell to the next guy who comes in the door.

    This is much the way luthier "schools" are run and its a load of crap. That school also means squat to us real luthiers and successful shop owners, in fact we view it as a detriment. If you want a real education you apprentice for a very long time. Which yes, you also pay for, but you are actually learning how to understand something vs. getting training to complete a task.

    Granted, there is a huge gulf between what is required to be a master luthier vs. what it takes to wrench on a bike, but the principle involved is exactly the same, just on a different scale.

    Buy the tools and book from them by all means if you like the guys, but there is no extremely broad, bordering on esoteric knowledge required to assemble and tune a bike to perfection, you don't even have to know how to ride to do it. It's something even the laziest autodidact could manage in an afternoon of reading this very forum and watching a half dozen youtube videos.

    So my vote is no on that one, I hope I have helped.
    I don't think this really applies unless we were talking about someone wanting to become a professional bicycle mechanic. The OP has a day job, just wants to gain a little more knowledge about his bike.

  8. #8
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    Yeah looking more along the lines of picking up some tips/ knowledge and hopefully answers to any questions I might have. I know its only 6 hrs and you get what you pay for. Broken down when deducting the tools, book from course its really $100 as pointed out for six hours of class=$16 an hr. I guess first day might be slow going but if Im able to bring/ tune up my bike second day and learn a few things prob worth it. Thanks for your help guys, appreciate it.

  9. #9
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    Exactly, I don't think anything they can cover in 6 hours you can't easily learn via books and the internet on your own for free.

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