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  1. #1
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    New question here. GT85 as chain lube?

    Earlier today I wanted to pick up some chain lube since my chain has been sounding a bit dry lately. Unfortunately, there was only one LBS open on a Sunday, so I wound up visiting them for the first time. The staff was incredibly friendly, but from the general atmosphere of the store it was rather apparent they weren't the kind of place I would trust with my bike. The only thing they had in the store as far as lube goes were areosal cans of GT85. Now I'm really not familar with this brand, and the label makes it look like much more of an All-in-one oil or WD-40. I've read mixed reviews online about using this as a chain lube or a general all-around bike lube, so I was hoping to find some more knowledgable information here from you guys

    I'd really like to know if this GT85 is a good solution for chain and general bike lube, or if I should look into something else. The directions also state that for best coverage of the PFTE additive that it shouldn't be wiped down after applying. Should I stick with this recommedation, or should I still wipe down the chain/lube points after letting it sit for a couple minutes? This is for a mountain bike, and most of my riding is done in northern IL/Southern Wisconsin. The trails are mostly dry and dusty singletrack and occasionally crushed limestone. I may also occasionally encounter muddy or wet trails, but this will not be the norm. So does GT85 sound like a good candidate for this application, or should I look elsewhere and keep the GT85 to sqeaky door duty? I'm very open to suggestions on good lubes to use, so feel free to let me know your thoughts.

    Thank you all in advance!

    -Woody

  2. #2
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    FWIW you don't need an lbs for 'chain lube'
    any hardware store will have lube (I use bar oil)
    But try out the gt85 and if it works, it works - simple as that
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  3. #3
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    My chain is lubed with paraffin wax (Old school chain cooking). I tried making my own icewax it just never bonded that as well as heating the chain in wax

    highdell, Chainsaw bar oil is brilliant?!!! The main issue is lubing without gunking up. What could be better than lube that is designed to run through saw dust?!!!

    Most petroleum based products will work fine.

    I'm not a fan of spray lube. Reminds me too much of WD-40. When I do use chain lube (for wet weather) I enjoy the 2 minutes Zen of dabbing drops of oil on the pins, running the cogs and wiping off the excess.

  4. #4
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    Well, from another forum I posted this on, I got the general idea that GT85 will do in a pinch, but it's best not to use it long-term. Does anyone have some recommendations on a quality chain lube and a quality all-around bike lube for my conditions? I would prefer to find something that is long lasting, too. I don't mind doing whatever maintenance is neccessary, but I'm not fond of the idea of having to relube my bike before every ride.

  5. #5
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    Been using Bar oil all fall, winter, and spring. Started with G-Oil (Home Depot, $5.99 a quart) which works great and is 100% biodegradable. But it's animal based (tallow) so I wanted to get some plant based stuff. Renewable Lubricants 15w-50 Bar and Chain Oil ($15 a quart shipped from Grainger) is Canola based and 100% biodegradable. It is quite thick so I cut it 1:1 with standard Canola Oil and it is a perfect weight. Been using it since December and it lasts a really long time and stays clean when applied properly, no chain suck even in the worst muddy PNW conditions. So I get 2 quarts for under $20 (quart of canola is about $4), it's 100% biodegradable, and performs as well or better than any wet lube (which far out perform wax lubes) I've used in 18 years of mountain biking. It was even used at the 24 hours of Old Pueblo with great success, did attract sand and dust.

  6. #6
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    GT85 is very similar to wd40. It's for displacing water from your drive-train, rather than lubricating. You'd be better with a slightly thicker, bicycle-specific lubrication, like Finish Line.

    The GT85 will be really good for polishing your bike though!

  7. #7
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    This...

    Quote Originally Posted by Captain Chaos
    ... bicycle-specific lubrication...
    makes me go...
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    makes me go...
    and this

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    Been using Bar oil all fall, winter, and spring. Started with G-Oil (Home Depot, $5.99 a quart) which works great and is 100% biodegradable. But it's animal based (tallow) so I wanted to get some plant based stuff. Renewable Lubricants 15w-50 Bar and Chain Oil ($15 a quart shipped from Grainger) is Canola based and 100% biodegradable. It is quite thick so I cut it 1:1 with standard Canola Oil and it is a perfect weight. Been using it since December and it lasts a really long time and stays clean when applied properly, no chain suck even in the worst muddy PNW conditions. So I get 2 quarts for under $20 (quart of canola is about $4), it's 100% biodegradable, and performs as well or better than any wet lube (which far out perform wax lubes) I've used in 18 years of mountain biking. It was even used at the 24 hours of Old Pueblo with great success, did attract sand and dust.
    I actually rode up to the hardware store earlier today, and picked up some biodegradable chain oil since you suggested it in the other thread - I figured I'd give it a shot. It just so happens to be the G-Oil brand, which I'm sad to hear is tallow based While I may not make perfect choices all the time, I do try to stay very aware of where my products come from, and try to stick with as many vegan choices as I can. One thing I noticed on the back of the bottle, in small print it states that the label uses recycled paper and is printed with soy based inks. Add this to the fact that I rode to the store instead of driving, and you've got one environmentally-friendly chain lube

    I also appreciate you sharing your 'secret sauce' recipe with us. I have a mason jar, canola oil, and the G-Oil sitting in my garage ready to go. Now it's time to test this bad boy out

    One more quick question for you - what do you use to apply the lube to the chain? I picked up a really cheap Radiator Coolant Tester (basically an eye-dropper with little balls in it) that has a 2"-3" long flexible piece of plastic tubing attached to the bottom of it. I figured this may work very well for getting into the chain links, and may be useful for other lubing applications around the bike.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by smwoodruff0908
    ... I picked up a really cheap Radiator Coolant Tester (basically an eye-dropper with little balls in it) that has a 2"-3" long flexible piece of plastic tubing attached to the bottom of it. I figured this may work very well for getting into the chain links, and may be useful for other lubing applications around the bike.
    sounds clever to me
    Personally, I just use the lid of the container - It also happens to be just about the correct 'dose' too -(of course it depends on the lid)
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by smwoodruff0908
    One more quick question for you - what do you use to apply the lube to the chain? I picked up a really cheap Radiator Coolant Tester (basically an eye-dropper with little balls in it) that has a 2"-3" long flexible piece of plastic tubing attached to the bottom of it. I figured this may work very well for getting into the chain links, and may be useful for other lubing applications around the bike.
    I actually use bottles that I purchased (old bicycle lube bottles work well too, just recycle the old crap) that are #2 plastic and have dropper style tops on e-bay for something like $9 for a dozen. I share my lube with others (I have enough to last me years if I just use it myself) so it gets them off the wax and dino stuff and it's a good testing ground. I just ask that they return the bottles when they're done or if they don't like it. I've had all good feedback on it, not out to make a buck...there are plenty of bio lubes for those who don't want to mix their own (Green Oil, Ernesto Lube, Pedros Chainj, etc). I'm just a DIY type of guy.

    The G-Oil works really well...they only reason I switched was the animal based thing.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    Personally, I just use the lid of the container - It also happens to be just about the correct 'dose' too -(of course it depends on the lid)
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    I actually use bottles that I purchased (old bicycle lube bottles work well too, just recycle the old crap) that are #2 plastic and have dropper style tops on e-bay for something like $9 for a dozen.
    Thanks for the input both of you! I was considering picking up a bottle of Pedro's ChainJ just so I could use the bottle for this mix after I ran out of it. I think I'm going to see how well this little coolant tester does, and if not, then I'll look into picking up a bottle or two from somewhere. Maybe you could find some empty ones at a LBS if you ask nicely. Although I'm not sure if they would use the small bottles, but it wouldn't hurt to ask. Maybe you could even ask if you could setup a little bin near the trash with a label for empty chain lube bottles. Then you can really start distributing your DIY mix to your friends

  13. #13
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    steal a ketchup/mustard squeezer-bottle from your local diner/drive-in.

    (and oh yeah, it's Ketchup (catch-up) not Catsup (cat-sup) wtf )
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  14. #14
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    Gt-85

    I've had good luck using GT-85 in dry conditions. It seems to hold up and last quite a long time for me. When conditions get a little wet I use a petroleum based oil. I think I have Finish Line Wet Lube on the shelf now. This is one of those subjects that can be debated until no end. If you find something you like and it works, then use it.

  15. #15
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    I tried the bar and chain oil method. I have never had such a mess on my hands after a few rides. It gets really dry and dusty here and that oil seems to really hold on to the stuff kicked up on the trail. I've never tried cutting it with canola so maybe it is worth another shot. FWIW, when I did it I used an old Tri-Flow bottle that I bored the tip out of. If you don't do that it might be too thick to get through those small holes. It worked great as a lubricant, just picked up too much stuff and held it from the dry trails.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  16. #16
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    Oh, and I do think that there is something wrong with "Bike Specific Lube" that costs $5 for 4 ounces when you can get a quart of bar and chain oil for $5. Maybe the world has gone crazy, or maybe it's just me.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParks
    I tried the bar and chain oil method. I have never had such a mess on my hands after a few rides. It gets really dry and dusty here and that oil seems to really hold on to the stuff kicked up on the trail. I've never tried cutting it with canola so maybe it is worth another shot. FWIW, when I did it I used an old Tri-Flow bottle that I bored the tip out of. If you don't do that it might be too thick to get through those small holes. It worked great as a lubricant, just picked up too much stuff and held it from the dry trails.
    If you have a mess, your using it wrong. Follow these guidelines from my blog

    http://mtnbiker72.blogspot.com/2009/...-wet-lube.html

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    I..Follow these guidelines ..
    that sucks...
    I used to agree with you.
    now, you give orders - and due to my anti-establishment mentality, I have to reject them.

    and since we agreed on stuff, now I gotta disagree.

    I now recommend using powdered salt for lube.
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    If you have a mess, your using it wrong. Follow these guidelines from my blog

    http://mtnbiker72.blogspot.com/2009/...-wet-lube.html
    Doing it wrong.

    Hmmm, put lube on, let sit, rub off excess. Seems pretty complicated. No, wait... that's what I did. Chain still got really grimy really fast. I don't argue that a lube that is made to work through sawdust and dirt at high RPM's wouldn't be great for a bike, but in my (and perhaps only my) experience on really dry, really dusty trails I found it to get too dirty and give a grating sound within 10 miles.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParks
    Doing it wrong.

    Hmmm, put lube on, let sit, rub off excess. Seems pretty complicated. No, wait... that's what I did. Chain still got really grimy really fast. I don't argue that a lube that is made to work through sawdust and dirt at high RPM's wouldn't be great for a bike, but in my (and perhaps only my) experience on really dry, really dusty trails I found it to get too dirty and give a grating sound within 10 miles.
    There is a right and wrong way to put wet lube on...the wrong way gives you your results regardless of the riding conditions. Maybe you could learn something

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    There is a right and wrong way to put wet lube on...the wrong way gives you your results regardless of the riding conditions. Maybe you could learn something
    May we see a photo of your chain/cassette?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    May we see a photo of your chain/cassette?
    here's mine
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72
    There is a right and wrong way to put wet lube on...the wrong way gives you your results regardless of the riding conditions. Maybe you could learn something
    I read your blog. Your method of putting lubricant on a chain isn't a new breakthrough in bike maintenance. Is it that I am doing it wrong or just riding in dirty conditions. I mean, I don't have a blog but I seem to be able to put lube on a chain. I don't have that problem to that with other lubes. Realize people's experiences differ.
    Some days you eat the bar, some days the bar eats you.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParks
    Realize people's experiences differ.
    What chain lube do you use?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by DParks
    I read your blog. Your method of putting lubricant on a chain isn't a new breakthrough in bike maintenance. Is it that I am doing it wrong or just riding in dirty conditions. I mean, I don't have a blog but I seem to be able to put lube on a chain. I don't have that problem to that with other lubes. Realize people's experiences differ.
    It takes some effort and time to thoroughly dry the chain after applying the lube, which should only be between the pins and rollers at that point. The chain should feel dry to the touch. If you have any excess at all, you will collect dirt on the chain.

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