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Thread: grease

  1. #1
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    grease

    i am looking to do a bottem bracket rebuild and i don't know what grease the use
    Come on stand up to go over that log

  2. #2
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    You're likely to get a different response from every person. That said, Park puts out their polylube grease, which works fine. There is also your standard white lithium grease, available at any automotive parts store.

  3. #3
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    Marine grease- Harbor freight and use the 20% in store coupon on their website.

  4. #4
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    Second Marine grease. I use Phil Wood which is probably just re-branded Castrol Marine Grease. Stays contaminant free for a while.

  5. #5
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    Well... as indicated by wschruba, "you are likely a different response from every person". And I'm no different. Generally speaking, I agree with the marine grease thought. For the bottom bracket bearings, I generally prefer a waterproof grease. My logic is that I do ride in areas that involves water and mud on occasion. And, I have experienced failed bottom bracket bearings as a result of water/rust damage on reasonably new, low time bearings that lacked the proper original lubrication from Shimano. But that's another story.

    However, I also feel that choice of lubrication (grease) can be somewhat variable depending on environment and riding conditions. Riding in the more arid areas of the southwest might never see a wet or muddy environment and therefore could take advantage of a thinner, lighter lubricant with a lower friction coefficient. Frequency of maintenance can also play a role in choice and type of lubricant.

    Bottom line is that one type of grease might not be as well suited for your particular case. There are a number of high quality greases available. Do a little more research and understand some of the properties involved for your application. I know that this really didn't answer your question, but might have given you something to think about.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  6. #6
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    Aeroshell 6...because I have buttloads of expired grease from work.

  7. #7
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    The non-aviation guys prolly don't know about Aeroshell 6.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRider View Post
    Aeroshell 6...because I have buttloads of expired grease from work.
    What exactly is the FAA worried about when it comes to expired lubricants?

  9. #9
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    It gets thick & clumpy after many years. It has a 2 year shelf life, but it doesn't physically go bad then.Expiration dates are just anal "cover your ass" bs. If there is an aircraft incident & the FAA finds expired items at your site, they will nail you whether it's related to the incident or not.

  10. #10
    Now, THAT'S gonna hurt!
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    This just in....NTSB just reported that VG Spaceship II used expired Aeroshell 6.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRider View Post
    It gets thick & clumpy after many years. It has a 2 year shelf life, but it doesn't physically go bad then.Expiration dates are just anal "cover your ass" bs. If there is an aircraft incident & the FAA finds expired items at your site, they will nail you whether it's related to the incident or not.
    Expiration dates are NOT just anal "cover your ass" bs. Aerospace lubricant shelf life isn't based on Cover Your Ass principles. Lubricants that are expected to perform under a vastly wider range of environments and conditions are manufactured under considerably tighter and higher tolerances.

    Shelf life is in place because over time, high performance greases experience "bleed" (grease oil release characteristics measured by NLGI Grade standards) that from an engineering standpoint, reduces the lubricants ability to perform as intended during the spectrum of temperatures or pressures. Loss or separation of key volatile oils is natural over extended time frames. This separation affects grease consistency and thus can significantly reduce critical high and low temperature range lubrication capability.

    So DaveRider has witnessed the result of shelf life deterioration (thick and clumpy), he just failed to understand the consequences of a component failure as a result using this expired and degraded product at 60 below zero while motoring along at 460 MPH at 51,000 feet.

    Personally, I prefer expired Mobilgrease 33 for bike components.
    A bad day of cycling is better than a good day at work

    Work Truck - Dassault Falcon 7X

  12. #12
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    My point was that they don't drop dead one day after the expiration date, therefore it is bs. The dates are an estimation. I know what could happen if deteriorated grease is used in an aircraft. That's why I don't do it. I perfectly understand that it separates over time. I just didn't want to sound aloof & write a long explanation.

  13. #13
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    I spent some time.working in an aircraft shop as a welder. Didn't take long that every bit of paper work we did was so somebody could point a finger at us when an aircraft fell out of the sky. none of it seemed unreasonable considering what was at stake though.

    I've seen grease separate, didn't think it was anything a good stirring couldn't solve though.

  14. #14
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    Park tool grease, works fine for me.

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