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  1. #1
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    Gear up bike tree HD

    Anyone used this bike stand?

    http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Up-Bike-T...8595399&sr=1-1

    It seems perfect for my apartment to store the bikes on and do some light maintenance.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    http://www.amazon.com/Gear-Up-Bike-T...8595399&sr=1-1

    It seems perfect for my apartment to store the bikes on and do some light maintenance.
    I don't have that rack, but I think I have one of the floor-to-ceiling racks made by the same company. (I don't recall the brand, but it looks just like the floor-to-ceiling rack made by Gear Up as shown on Amazon.)

    Verify that each support has independent height adjustments for the left and right side. It's hard to tell from the picture whether that is the case or not.

    If the supports are similar to the ones on my rack, they're covered with some sort of rubberized material. They won't mar the bike on the first use, but over time, they'll leave some scuff marks on the frame. I think one of the problems is that the supports flex somewhat. When you place a bike on it, the support flexes and may slide a short ways along the frame before settling into position.

    I also have some freestanding racks that I got at Supergo (which was later purchased by Performance Bike). They're a lot more solid than the Gear Up rack that I have. It looks like Nashbar has them too. Here's a link: Nashbar Steel Bike Rack. (I couldn't find this rack at Performance's site. They might have them in the stores though.) In addition to being more solid, the supports are also easier to adjust.

  3. #3
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    Here is another rack where you can adjust both arms separately.

    http://www.amazon.com/Racor-PLB-2R-T...8757888&sr=1-2

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    Here is another rack where you can adjust both arms separately.

    http://www.amazon.com/Racor-PLB-2R-T...8757888&sr=1-2
    Looks promising. Particularly interesting is the picture (below) showing a lady's bike being held by the rack. The bike in question doesn't have a top tube. A similar problem occurs with some full suspension frames. Not that they lack a top tube, but sometimes the space between the top tube and down tube isn't large enough to allow both arms to be inserted. Or the frame may be of a monocoque design where there's no place to put an arm under the top tube at all.

    I'd like to see a close-up of one of the arms though.


  5. #5
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    KevinB I purchased the stand shown in the pic above.

    It is very easy to assemble and and does not require bolts or nuts.

    I have only one bike right now and tried it in both the lower and upper position and it hold fine.

    The arms are adjustable so it should accommodate different frames.

    I should be getting my new AM bike soon so I'll post pics with both of them suspended.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    do some light maintenance.

    light is the key word here. I have a similar rack and thought the same thing. But really doing anything aside from cleaning is kinda a pain.

    The reason is most likely you wont be able to pedal because the pedals will hit the vertical section of the stand itself (not the arms). Secondly the rack is just that - I am guessing like mine your bikes will simply hang from the arms which allows the bike to move all over. Mine swings back and forth (toward the wall) which makes it hard to work on.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    I should be getting my new AM bike soon so I'll post pics with both of them suspended.
    Thanks for the info. I look forward to seeing your photos. If you can manage it, I'd particularly like to see a close-up of one of the arms.

  8. #8
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    My second bike hasn't arrived yet. But here are two pics. One pic showing the suspended bike and one pic showing the attachment arm.



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    My second bike hasn't arrived yet. But here are two pics. One pic showing the suspended bike and one pic showing the attachment arm.
    Thanks for posting pics.

    What is the material used on the arms for holding the bike(s)?

    (As mentioned in an earlier post, the arms on one of my racks, even though coated with some sort of rubbery material, tend to mar the paint somewhat. The arms on your stand look more substantial, being both wider where the bike is supported, and I'm guessing less likely to flex, so it'll probably be a non-issue for you.)

  10. #10
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    The arms holding the bike are rubber coated and are wide enough for even thicker frames.

    I don't really know if it will do any damage to the paint. It seems soft enough to not do any damage. Is yours marring the paint due to the size of the suspending hook?

    For $48 shipped I believe I got a pretty good deal.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dictatorsaurus
    Is yours marring the paint due to the size of the suspending hook?
    That could be it. The arms are a very thick gauge wire covered with some sort of rubber material. It may be that there's not enough surface area to provide adequate support. Or it could be that the arms are a little bit too flexible and tend to move if the rack or bike is jostled. Also, due to their flexibility, the arms will slide a bit when a bike is placed on the rack. It's not an extreme problem as in the paint wearing away to bare metal or anything, but it does (eventually) cause a blemish.

  12. #12
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    If you have some scrap lumber laying around, and a jig saw, you can make these for free.
    I haven't finished mine yet (have to rearrange the garage first to clear a wall).

  13. #13
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    So got my second bike and tried to mount both bikes on the stand.

    Unfortunately the stand seems a little too short. The bottom bike has to have the seat lowered to fit on the rack. Both bike frames are large so that has something to do with it I guess.


  14. #14
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    Can you adjust the arms so the wheels are level, rather than the arms level? Would that provide additional clearance?
    Hey everybody, ride my wheels! They ride good, real good.
    I'm a wheel builder. SRLPE Wheel Works. Send me a PM.

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