Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    49

    Dry lube doesn't work

    End of story. You are wrong. Do not pass go, do not collect $200.
    Ride to the Ride

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,661
    Dry lube works great in the proper conditions and when used appropriately.

    I used it for a long time, it's worked well, it continues to work well, I will keep using it.

  3. #3
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Wax cannot flow in it's solid state, so once it gets scraped off it no longer provides lubricating properties. That is why dry lubes need to be re-applied constantly. I tried the dry lube thing when I was living down in Las Vegas, none would last a 20 mile ride without needing re-application in completely dry conditions.

  4. #4
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,848
    Dry lube works fine for some people - I used to use it all the time with no problems. As mtnbiker72 pointed out, it requires frequent reapplication (after every ride.)

  5. #5
    TrinityRiverKerplunk
    Reputation: unicrown junkie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Posts
    643
    I'm still having a hard time using the stuff. I had the same problems, wears off to fast, But I hear Boeshield works well if you apply it eight hours ahead of time.

    Seriously!
    Good friction shifting is getting hard to find nowadays....

  6. #6
    Dirt Huffer
    Reputation: AC/BC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    1,359
    Sounds more like an operator error.
    26" for life!!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    49
    Anyone who has any attention to detail and knows the sound of a drivetrain that needs lube knows that dry lube doesn't work.
    Ride to the Ride

  8. #8
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,848
    Quote Originally Posted by PetesDustyVolvo View Post
    Anyone who has any attention to detail and knows the sound of a drivetrain that needs lube knows that dry lube doesn't work.
    Definitely sounds like operator error.

    What dry lubes have you tried that didn't work? San Diego isn't exactly harsh on the drivetrain.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mudflapper's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    18
    I use Finish Line dry lube and IMO it works great!

  10. #10
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,123
    It works great... for half an hour. Beyond that, results are debatable.
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    7,661
    Quote Originally Posted by PetesDustyVolvo View Post
    Anyone who has any attention to detail and knows the sound of a drivetrain that needs lube knows that dry lube doesn't work.
    I know very well what an unlubed drivetrain sounds like, and I know dry lube works very well in my situation.

    Your specific circumstances are everyone's circumstances.

  12. #12
    bi-winning
    Reputation: rkj__'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    11,123
    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Your specific circumstances are everyone's circumstances.
    Awesome typo!
    When under pressure, your level of performance will sink to your level of preparation.


    Shorthills Cycling Club

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    195
    To the OP, what was this thread supposed to accomplish? It looks to me like a weak attempt at trolling.

  14. #14
    Can Tree Member
    Reputation: Dad Man Walking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    846
    Quote Originally Posted by jmeldrum26 View Post
    To the OP, what was this thread supposed to accomplish? It looks to me like a weak attempt at trolling.
    Nothing to see here...move on.
    Dad is sad.
    Very, very sad.
    He had a bad day.
    What a day Dad had!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    102
    One drop of Boeshield on each link, give it a good wipe-down right away, let dry and then soak it with White Lightning. Works good for keeping dust and or mud off, and provides longer lubed time. It's good to give your bike some love!

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: William_Cannon's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    283
    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker72 View Post
    Wax cannot flow in it's solid state, so once it gets scraped off it no longer provides lubricating properties. That is why dry lubes need to be re-applied constantly. I tried the dry lube thing when I was living down in Las Vegas, none would last a 20 mile ride without needing re-application in completely dry conditions.
    In extremely dusty conditions, I apply after ever ride (10-15 mi). In regular dry conditions, I apply every other ride.

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    203
    Lets not forget that the part of a chain that requires lube is the part we cannot see or touch, and in fact, it is ideal that we can't see or touch any of the lube. If you cannot regularly get through one dry ride with a dry lube, you're not letting your lube work in to your chain enough.

  18. #18
    Former Bike Wrench
    Reputation: mtnbiker72's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    15,985
    Quote Originally Posted by Matty F View Post
    Lets not forget that the part of a chain that requires lube is the part we cannot see or touch, and in fact, it is ideal that we can't see or touch any of the lube. If you cannot regularly get through one dry ride with a dry lube, you're not letting your lube work in to your chain enough.
    Instructions always followed exactly as written on the bottle, I've lubed more chains than most people as a mechanic for 8 years so I'm beyond competent. Most dry lubes have you wastefully pour the crap all over the chain then let it soak in while the solvent carrier evaporates (nice VOC action going on there). The the now dry wax simply sheds off or the metal to metal contact shears the wax off and since dried wax cannot flow, it can't re-lubricate so it simply falls off or is pushed out of the chain. So you have to put more on...constantly. Does it keep your chain clean, yes. Does it properly lubricate the inner workings of your chain, not for very long.

    If you don't mind wasting money on 4oz bottles of dry lube that you blow through because of the wasteful application method and how often it needs to be done then dry lube may work for you.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Posts
    203
    My apologies. I thought you were referring to a liquid "dry weather" lube, as apposed to a heavy "wet weather" lube. Literal dry lube (eg. a wax, non-liquid lube) does not work. I agree. The only exception being the factory film that comes stock on some chains (some still use more of a liquid lube from the factory).

  20. #20
    The Wiking
    Reputation: Ranger Radon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    69
    As matty f, I see no reason why PTFE lube(dry-lube) shouldnt work!
    However wax, paraffin etc. can hardly be described as being 'LUBE'.. allthough fluid whilest warm, it is not lube(in my book that is).

    I've used a lot of dry lube on my boat, rollers, blocks, sails etc. because it isn't messy. I have not considered trying it on my chain, however levers, shifters and cables it is supreme!
    with speed, shall technique be conquered

    The streets are the sketchiest of trails.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swingset's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    342
    PTFE based dry lubes (such as Dupont's Teflon variety, or Liquid Wrench) work very well although they do need re-application fairly often.

    Wet lubes flow, but they're also an attractant for dirt and dust, which when mixed with the lube can create a slurry that acts as a grinding paste. Your chain sounds plush, but it may still be taking its toll on the metal surfaces.

    I see this on motorcycle offroad chains. In that capacity, I use dry lubes and have chains that see 20,000 miles of offroad use, and experience ZERO difference in wear or longevity between that and wet lubes. If they wear the chain by shedding off, they're also not holding onto grit so it's probably a wash either way, IMHO. The dry lubes work well on my bicycles too, I experience no issues there.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 11
    Last Post: 09-28-2011, 03:19 PM
  2. Lube - Super Lube, Manitou prep m, other?
    By eastman in forum Turner
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 03-10-2011, 11:54 AM
  3. Insertion/Mating: Lube or not lube your spindle?
    By ncj01 in forum Singlespeed
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 12-05-2009, 09:10 AM
  4. Removing Shock Boots (01 Manitou Mars) - To Lube or not to Lube?
    By MustangCarter in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 05-06-2008, 11:36 PM
  5. Finish line's Stanchion Lube, does it really work??
    By Pableras in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-11-2007, 01:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •