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  1. #1
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    DIY vs. Take it to the Shop

    Hi folks,

    Just curious on what type of maintenance work do you guys do yourselves vs. pay a pro to do. I just brought my bike in for a regular tune-up and it turned out that other parts needed to be replaced that I didn't know about and is ending up costing me a good chunk of change.

    I consider myself pretty handy with tools but with work, wife, and life, I don't have that much time to get passionate about maintaining/fixing my bike. Secondly, I don't want to screw it up since it would affect my actual safety when I'm riding it.

    I have a park tool workstand and the basic tools but I the work I typically do is just replacing tubes and washing the bike.

  2. #2
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    Wanted to follow up with a question for the more experienced guys out here.

    What type of maintenance work would you guys recommend that I proactively try to learn to save me time and money in the long run? Wheel truing? Shock rebuilding? Just interested in something relatively easy to learn. Not interested in getting overly technical or taking my bike completely apart but I get a few hours here and there to tinker on my bike.

  3. #3
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    Start with the stuff that needs to happen more often. Adjusting brakes and derailleurs for example. Between that and swapping tires (which it sounds like you can already handle) you can save yourself lots of cash at the local shop. Maybe wheel truing if that's a common issue for you. I don't have wheel issues often so that's one thing I haven't bothered to try yet.

    There's nothing on a bike that's really that difficult to handle. Some things require certain tools which can get expensive but over time end up being worth it. Taking apart suspension parts was always the one that scared me but after doing it a few times it's not really that big a deal.

    Next time your bike needs some attention just jump in and figure it out. There are plenty of books out there to help learn how to maintain it you just have to start somewhere and try it. If you get bored and the weather sucks take your bike apart, get the parts nice and cleaned up, and reassemble for practice.

  4. #4
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    @7daysaweek

    Thanks for the tips, I think brake adjustment and derailleurs would be a good start!!

  5. #5
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    Get yourself equipped to do an annual tune up. That'll be a good investment and save you money over a few years.

    Suspension rebuilds, brake bleed, adjust drive train, check and torque bolts & BB.

    Troubleshooting and repair takes some experience for some things. But if your already tuning up your bike, you'll have a better understanding of things.

  6. #6
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    Buy the tools as you need them, chain whip, cassette lock ring tool etc. Bikes are a little frustrating as they require unique tools and the can change standards, bottom bracket removal tools! I would just avoid the really expensive and infrequent use tools, like a headset press, get the shop to do those.
    Otherwise just practice, bleeding brakes is possibly the most daunting one, but it's like anything, easier the second time.
    As for shocks and forks, watch YouTube, see if your comfortable with the task. Some are much easier than others, open bath Marzocchi forks are very simple.

  7. #7
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    Learn to knock out the common/routine things. Things like:
    -Adjusting both derailleurs
    -Adjusting or bleeding brakes
    -Installing new shifter and/or brake cables
    -Changing brake pads
    -Inspecting and replacing your drivetrain bits (cassette, chain, and chainrings)
    -Servicing your suspension (basic oil change/seal service)

    The majority of those things are done during a routine tune up or should be done at a regular interval. All of them are pretty easy to learn and can save you quite a bit of money. If some of them sound intimidating (brake bleeding and suspension in particular), look up a YouTube video for your particular parts and see what you think.

  8. #8
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    Thanks for the tips guys - much appreciated...

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