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  1. #1
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    Critique my chain checker.....

    I am not very knowledgeable in checking chain wear. I came up with this design today, but I'm not sure if it addresses the task properly. Also not sure if anybody else has tried it this way. Any help from you chain nerds appreciated. Do you see any potential problems?

    The idea is to have a chain stretcher and a see-thru ruler over the chain pivots.

    Here is some pics.

    The prototype



    Mounted on a bike



    Eye balling chain wear



    So what do you think of eyeballing this way? I will have two lines with a GO and NO GO. I just need to compute what those numbers are But you get the drift.

    Ideally, I'd like the stretcher to be spring loaded. The unit above fits snug though with the wedge fitting. Zero can be calibrated by loosening the screw and adjusting the clear ruler.

    I know, it looks like crap. I made the mistake of using MDF I shoulda used some good wood. Its just a prototype anyway.
    Last edited by bing!; 10-24-2011 at 12:30 PM.

  2. #2
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    Haha! It works good. I didnt think a 1/32 gap would be easy to see, but it is. Parallax error from the lens angle shows the lines being off a little. But in person, its spot on. Just slap the bar and its GO or NO GO When the right line is in the center of the pivot, replace the chain.


  3. #3
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    Good idea for a quick check.

    I can't seem to get a good measurement with the chain on the bike. I have a worn chain hanging on a finish nail. To check mine, I just hang it on the same nail and see if it's as long as the worn one. Of course, I use quick links.

  4. #4
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    Hey, thanks. Just checking if the concept is sound. I dont think im getting bushing error this way.

  5. #5
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    Have you made the acrylic piece able to slide to align the markers over the pins correctly? i see slots cut into the screw holes. If you are, then I think you are removing the bushing error.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by BritOnTour View Post
    Have you made the acrylic piece able to slide to align the markers over the pins correctly? i see slots cut into the screw holes. If you are, then I think you are removing the bushing error.
    Yes, I did. Thanks.

  7. #7
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    I see the following improvements, if you are interested...

    1) Length of the tool might make it hard to use on shorter chainstay length bikes and also harder to handle or transport.
    2) The slider mechanism could be better than unscrewing and retightening, you might move the mark when tightening, making it hard to use.
    3) I'm not sure the stretcher is important, your derailleur already stretches the chain but it keeps the tool well in place so it might be worth keeping.

    Good job.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    I see the following improvements, if you are interested...

    1) Length of the tool might make it hard to use on shorter chainstay length bikes and also harder to handle or transport.
    2) The slider mechanism could be better than unscrewing and retightening, you might move the mark when tightening, making it hard to use.
    3) I'm not sure the stretcher is important, your derailleur already stretches the chain but it keeps the tool well in place so it might be worth keeping.

    Good job.
    I realized it was too long first time tried it

    The stretcher also keeps the gauge on the chain without being held. Much easier than holding a ruler to a stretched chain for older folks like me.

    If this thing works, i believe a production version should be made of a stamped aluminum chain stretcher, a sliding clear measuring ruler and thumb screws. I have no commercial interest at this point. Just putting it out there.

    Great input. Thanks.

  9. #9
    is turning a big gear
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    If I was going to DIY a chain checker I would just copy the Park CC3.2 and cut one out of medium sheet metal (the thickness of an office file cabinet) and file it until it's the exact same length as the Park tool.

    You really can't beat the simplicity of it.
    Get it unlocked.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by estabro View Post
    If I was going to DIY a chain checker I would just copy the Park CC3.2 and cut one out of medium sheet metal (the thickness of an office file cabinet) and file it until it's the exact same length as the Park tool.

    You really can't beat the simplicity of it.
    Those dont work well.

    "There are also special tools made to measure chain wear; these are a bit more convenient, though by no means necessary, and most -- except for the Shimano TL-CN40 and TL-CN41 -- are inaccurate because they allow roller play to confound the measurement of rivet-pin wear." - Sheldon Brown

  11. #11
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    Park chain checker worth the upgrade?

    The new Park chain checker is longer than the old one. Is that better (ie worth buying the new one)? Thanks, Steve.

  12. #12
    is turning a big gear
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing! View Post
    Those dont work well.

    "There are also special tools made to measure chain wear; these are a bit more convenient, though by no means necessary, and most -- except for the Shimano TL-CN40 and TL-CN41 -- are inaccurate because they allow roller play to confound the measurement of rivet-pin wear." - Sheldon Brown
    The measurement from a chain checker is sufficient evidence to replace a chain.

    I use the Park CC-2- as a chain get's worn, the measurement changes. When it passes a threshold, the chain goes in the trash. It does not matter if it's measuring the pins or the rollers- when the measurement exceeds the replacement threshold, then chain goes in the trash. I ride 350-400 hours/ year and consider chains to be fairly expendable and don't fret about it too much.
    Get it unlocked.

  13. #13
    g3h6o3
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    Quote Originally Posted by estabro View Post
    It does not matter if it's measuring the pins or the rollers
    Of course it matters, you're not measuring the same thing. But this is old story, let's not get into a pissing contest.
    Check out my SportTracks plugins for some training aid software.

  14. #14
    is turning a big gear
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    Quote Originally Posted by PissedOffCil View Post
    Of course it matters, you're not measuring the same thing. But this is old story, let's not get into a pissing contest.
    Well, in that case I will let you have the last word
    Get it unlocked.

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