Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    230

    Cold-setting chainstays: be careful or just whack it in?

    I've got a steel frame with 130mm dropouts, and for a range of reasons want it to use 135mm hubs.

    On the internet, opinion seems divided over whether to carefully space it out with the right tools, or just throw the hub in there and put up with difficult wheel insertion until it sets to the new width.

    Anyone tried both methods or know of any major hazards involved?

  2. #2
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,246
    I would set the frame, it's not all that hard. You'l need a sturdy bench vise, pry bar and some kind of overall frame alignment gauge to make sure the dropouts are centered. You could improvise with a straight edge and a ruler if you want to.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: J.B. Weld's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    2,478
    I would re-space the triangle too. If you squeeze the hub into 130 the dropouts will not likely be parallel and that is hard on bearings, and also prevents the wheel from securing as tightly to the frame as it should.

    If your dropouts are aligned correctly now they won't be when you re-space it so I would check that as well as frame alignment. The (infamous) Park frame alignment tool is easy to use and you could easily improvise your own like customfab said. Not so hard to do and little hazard involved if your reasonably careful. Aside from dropout alignment you could practically do the whole job using just your hands, sometimes your frame is already off a tad and you can move just one chainstay.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    477
    As always: SHTA.

    (SHTA = Sheldon Has The Answer)

  5. #5
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,246
    I wish I had the time to go through and update the SB website. Seems like there's a lot of information that's out of date or non existent. Great fondation though.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    230
    Will 2.5mm movement on each side change the dropout angle so badly that it affects the hub?

    Also, the dropouts are a little weird on this frame. They're a sort of aluminium sliding vertical dropout, which I'm not familiar with because I've only used track ends previously.

    Don't know how that assembly will handle the stress.

  7. #7
    Plays with tools
    Reputation: customfab's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    4,246
    When you set the frame, take those sliders off. I wouldn't worry to much about the angle of the dropout. They won't change much with the minimal amount you're looking to spread the frame. The hub can pull them back into phase.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    230

    Cold-setting chainstays: be careful or just whack it in?

    Thanks for the info.

    I'll be back in a couple of weeks with a bent frame for sale cheap.

Similar Threads

  1. Cold setting a frame
    By crux in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 01-11-2013, 05:10 AM
  2. Limits of cold-setting or witch-wanding
    By Meriwether in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-21-2011, 10:11 PM
  3. Tube bending: Cold Setting vs Heating
    By j.m. in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 09-01-2011, 10:46 PM
  4. Cold setting steel and acceptable tolerances
    By TheWoodsman in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-18-2011, 04:48 AM
  5. cold setting ti
    By 1niceride in forum Frame Building
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-12-2011, 06:51 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •