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  1. #1
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    Clamping Carbon bikes to a Stand

    I'm sure this has been covered.
    I have aluminum seat posts that I clamp to on my Carbon Bikes.

    I have seen other riders (and mechanics at the LBS) clamp to their Rear Shock.
    Either to the shaft or housing. I'm assuming that this is a horrible idea.. especially as XC Rear Shocks are VERY light and have no structural strength for clamping.

    What's your call? I couldn't find anything in any of the shock or mechanic websites.

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Just do not use the clamp like you would a quick release! Close the clamp at a loose fit, then tighten the knob to snug.

  3. #3
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    I clamp to the post on any bike, except maybe heavy steel or cheap aluminum. Clamping to a carbon frame, or a shock is complete hack IMO.

  4. #4
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    +1 on only clamping by the seat post. The only bikes I don't clamp by the seat post are kid's bikes.
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  5. #5
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    Seatpost seatpost seatpost. It its a bare frame, get a seatpost.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce M View Post
    I have seen other riders (and mechanics at the LBS) clamp to their Rear Shock.
    Tell them they're stupid and punch them in the face.

  7. #7
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    What if you have a dropper Post? Still clamp to the dropper post?

  8. #8
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    At least for rock shox the answer is yes. The reverb instructions have it and you just need to be aware of where the Line is at. One thing to consider is the Feedback sports clamp. It uses a screw type clamp instead of a leverage one and you are far less likely to over clamp them. Other advantage over the park style is the clamp is not as tall so it works on a wider range of seatposts without having to change the height. Huge fan of mine.

  9. #9
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    Hm I have a specialized command post blacklite. The instructions doesn't say anything about it. I guess safest thing to do is to just put a normal post in and clamp it that way. But that's such a PITA

  10. #10
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    You can clamp a carbon seat post without a problem, but I generally try to stay away from clamping any part of the frame unless the type of clamp I have gives me no other option. If that's the case, I like to put a rag around the tube I'm clamping or even better some pipe insulating foam to add some padding.

  11. #11
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    Where I work we use a Park tool internal-seat-tube-clamp-isc-4 on any bike that has a carbon post. I have seen a couple carbon post cracked. It only takes a minute to instal it, and its cheaper than buying a new post

    ISC-4 Demonstration - YouTube
    Last edited by wabiker3576; 10-23-2012 at 11:38 PM. Reason: insert vid
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  12. #12
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    Looks snazzy, but I'm willing to bet for what Park charges, you could buy a whole range of steel or aluminum kalloy posts in the sizes you needed, and still come out on top.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wschruba View Post
    Looks snazzy, but I'm willing to bet for what Park charges, you could buy a whole range of steel or aluminum kalloy posts in the sizes you needed, and still come out on top.

    If you need multiple sizes (bike shop?) than that tool is a bargain. Not having to fish for the right size post when you're screaming busy= priceless, and they do get them @ wholesale anyway. I wish that tool was available when I was wrenching.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wabiker3576 View Post
    Where I work we use a Park tool internal-seat-tube-clamp-isc-4 on any bike that has a carbon post. I have seen a couple carbon post cracked. It only takes a minute to instal it, and its cheaper than buying a new post

    ISC-4 Demonstration - YouTube
    Or your boss could hire mechanics that aren't gorillas and clamp the seat post. It's perfectly fine to clamp a carbon seat post if it's done properly. The park tool is a band aid for poorly trained mechanics. I don't fault them at all for making it though. What happens when you have a customer that's very sensitive to saddle height? Taking the post out creates more work and opens the process up for error.

  15. #15
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    Some customers are paranoid about where the mechanic will clamp on the bike in the stand. You always have that guy who wants to make the mechanic aware he doesn't like you clamping on carbon anything. It's nice to have the ISC-4 around to show those customers that you won't clamp on their seatpost. A quick layer of tape on the seatpost around where it meets the frame ensures that when you put the post back in exactly where it was. I do that whether the customer is sensitive with their seat height or not.
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Some customers are paranoid about where the mechanic will clamp on the bike in the stand. You always have that guy who wants to make the mechanic aware he doesn't like you clamping on carbon anything. It's nice to have the ISC-4 around to show those customers that you won't clamp on their seatpost. A quick layer of tape on the seatpost around where it meets the frame ensures that when you put the post back in exactly where it was. I do that whether the customer is sensitive with their seat height or not.
    Those customers need education to make them realize their paranoia isn't warranted. The tape trick works OK but it's still infinitely better to just leave the damn seat post in the frame.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Some customers are paranoid about where the mechanic will clamp on the bike in the stand. You always have that guy who wants to make the mechanic aware he doesn't like you clamping on carbon anything. It's nice to have the ISC-4 around to show those customers that you won't clamp on their seatpost. A quick layer of tape on the seatpost around where it meets the frame ensures that when you put the post back in exactly where it was. I do that whether the customer is sensitive with their seat height or not.
    Or you can nod and agree, and clamp the bike when the customer leaves.

    99% of people wouldn't dream of telling their car mechanic how to work on their vehicle, but something about bikes makes people think that their mechanic is unskilled or doesn't know about their bike.

    I've had people tell me how to set a quick release, for crying out loud.

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