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  1. #1
    saddlemeat
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    Chain whip substitute

    Discovered this works pretty well. It's a standard vise grip c clamp, just clamp it between opposite teeth on one of the larger cogs. Don't overdo the clamping force, but got the job done for me in a moment of need and it's all I've used since. Some minor grinding on the clamp tips would make it even better but I haven't bothered yet.
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    Last edited by bsieb; 01-27-2013 at 06:45 AM.
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  2. #2
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    ...or something similar that's actually made for the job.
    Pedros Vise-Whip.


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  3. #3
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    You could always make one out of an old chain and some steel plate...

  4. #4
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    just use an old glove.

    been doing it for years, works every time.

  5. #5
    RLK
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    I love my Vise-Whip!

  6. #6
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man View Post
    just use an old glove.

    been doing it for years, works sometimes.
    FTFY^ And yeah, there are other ways to do the job, so? I'll be out riding long before you fabricate a whip or mail order one. Just another trick to add to your bag... relax.
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  7. #7
    saddlemeat
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    ...
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    works sometimes
    don't put the cassette on that tight then

    or get a bigger glove

  9. #9
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man View Post
    don't put the cassette on that tight then

    or get a bigger glove
    You got that right, too tight is one of my pet peeves, but it happens. You could clamp it in a vise too, if you had a vice. Might trash the cassette but you're putting another one on, right? Shop rags work too if the lock ring isn't too tight.
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  10. #10
    The Original Suspect
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    Not sure what the big deal is...why not just spend the $15 bucks for a chain whip?

  11. #11
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    my diy whip was free....works every time too & doesn't bugger up the cassette (what if you need to service hub but your cassette is good?)

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by HitmenOnlyInc View Post
    Not sure what the big deal is...why not just spend the $15 bucks for a chain whip?
    ...because a glove is free.

  13. #13
    saddlemeat
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    If I were going to buy a chain whip I would probably get a vice whip. Chain whips are always a bit of a balancing act so locking on is good. The wrench and lock ring tool can be awkward too. The vise grip works well for me and I have had no trouble with cassette damage, so I have little incentive to buy or make something else. But to each their own, it's all good.
    Last edited by bsieb; 01-17-2013 at 07:49 PM.
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  14. #14
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    I've used an old chain and a claw hammer in a pinch!

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by redmr2_man View Post
    ...because a glove is free.
    I know an old glove is free but I prefer to use the right tool for the job. I have used a glove, rag, an old towel, but the job goes much easier with the correct tool.

  16. #16
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    Chain whip substitute-imageuploadedbytapatalk1358484345.891128.jpg This works well.....single speeders have lots of extra excess chain lying around

  17. #17
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    How do yall use a glove?
    There's something about those long grueling climbs that gets my front end all stiff... And I'm not talking about lockout...

  18. #18
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    Put glove on hand.

    Hold cassette.

    Use cassette tool to loosen lockring.

    Drink beer.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by HitmenOnlyInc View Post
    Not sure what the big deal is...why not just spend the $15 bucks for a chain whip?
    That's what I thought when I first read the thread title. While it's great to have MacGyver skills and be able to improvise in a pinch I can't understand not getting the right tool if you have to use it often and it is inexpensive. Redmr2_man mentioned that an old glove is free but so is a scrap of steel and a chunk of old chain. I could never get mine off with a glove anyway because I do like the cassette lockring tight, one of my pet peeves is vibration noise caused by a loose cassette.

  20. #20
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    Last edited by edmorales; 01-18-2013 at 07:05 AM.

  21. #21
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    You can also clamp a length of chain (or old chain) in a bench vise and wrap it around the cassette like the miniature human in the picture above me is doing. If you put the wheel between yourself and the bench corner and rotate the wheel backwards to pull the chain tight it works very well. Leaves both hands free, too. That being said, I have a Pedro's vise-whip and a regular ol' chainwhip.

  22. #22
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmorales View Post
    This is elegant in it's simplicity and could be done road or trail side by loosely knotting one end of the chain around a sign post or small tree. Thinking touring/bikepacking here, as I don't know of too many other riders who carry a lock ring tool. I may drill a 3/8" hole through one of the porch posts at the bike house, slip a chain through the hole, nail through the end of the chain. The $15-$40 I saved is irrelevant, if it works well it's one less tool to keep track of. And then there's beer too.
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  23. #23
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    Speaking of touring and simple...


  24. #24
    saddlemeat
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    ^That is awesomely minimalist, I used to carry a Hyper-Cracker which works similarly and has a spoke wrench built in.
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    Last edited by bsieb; 01-27-2013 at 06:52 AM.
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  25. #25
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    I think chain whips are shop tools, or neglected bike tools. I have one, but for my bikes its always the glove/rag.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I think chain whips are shop tools, or neglected bike tools. I have one, but for my bikes its always the glove/rag.
    You don't get your cassette tight enough then..

  27. #27
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    I dont know why I would tighten it so tight its not easily serviceable. Having it as tight as I do causes no issues at all...

    Just to see what would happen, I did about 200 miles with a cassette way too loose, just hardly snugged up. Nothing happened.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I dont know why I would tighten it so tight its not easily serviceable. Having it as tight as I do causes no issues at all...

    Just to see what would happen, I did about 200 miles with a cassette way too loose, just hardly snugged up. Nothing happened.
    Loose cassette = sloppy shifting, premature wear of chain and freehub body, unnecessary noise and vibration and the obvious risk of it coming off. You want your cassette tight. I've worked in a shop and seen some pretty gnarly stuff from people who run their cassettes looser than they're supposed to.

  29. #29
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    i tighten my cassette. probably moreso than it needs.

    no loose cassette. no sloppy shifting. But I don't go a full or a half rotation after TIGHT either.

    and I still use a glove.

  30. #30
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    do you also torque the lock ring with hand in glove?

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Loose cassette = sloppy shifting, premature wear of chain and freehub body, unnecessary noise and vibration and the obvious risk of it coming off. You want your cassette tight. I've worked in a shop and seen some pretty gnarly stuff from people who run their cassettes looser than they're supposed to.




    ^^^ I've put in my fair share of shop time as well and after some time you get really tuned in to notice any flaws whatsoever when you test ride a bike, I guess you could say you develop "rabbit ears" so to speak and for me a loose cassette is easily noticeable when riding, especially when you transition from coasting to engagement.

    As mentioned earlier on "to each his own", but with all the cheap and easy ways shown here to remove a cassette and given how relatively infrequently it needs done I can't understand the reasoning behind not getting it tight.

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    You don't get your cassette tight enough then..
    Agreed.

    I also don't understand why people have trouble with chain whips, it's a simple tool.

  33. #33
    saddlemeat
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    Agreed.

    I also don't understand why people have trouble with chain whips, it's a simple tool.
    It's not so much that it's hard to use, it's just a little awkward handling the three tools (chain whip, lock ring tool, adjustable wrench) with two hands, especially since none of them will stay in place well without being held there. Your lock ring tool with the handle welded on to it would attest to that. I suppose you have an understandable bias towards the chain whip though.
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  34. #34
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    I made a chain whip with a old chain and a piece of metal . When I want to remove the cassete ,I put the locking tool in the vice ,chain whip on cassette holding it with one hand and turn the wheel ,a lot of leverage with wheel .

  35. #35
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    A wrench handle with a lockring tool built on does make things a lot easier, however a lot of people make it hard on themselves by doing it wrong. If you do find yourself with only a chainwhip, adjustable wrench, and cassette lockring tool I suggest using gravity to your advantage. Here is an unknown mechanic making things harder than need be IMO-



    And here is the first (only) image I could locate of someone doing it the easy way. An unknown bike mechanic somewhere in Africa using a custom made chainwhip-



    The chainwhip falls right on that way and you have all of your body weight to loosen it!

  36. #36
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    You're right. A lot of it is technique, however a lockring tool with a handle makes the job much easier.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by edmorales View Post
    do you also torque the lock ring with hand in glove?

    No tool needed to hold the cassette when tightening it.

    If the chain whip is in the shop (garage} and I'm in the basement I'll try the 18" pipe wrench on the largest cog. If too tight to use without damage I'll make the 100' trek to get the tool. If its really cold or raining I'll try a little harder with the pipe wrench.
    lean forward

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1niceride View Post
    No tool needed to hold the cassette when tightening it.

    If the chain whip is in the shop (garage} and I'm in the basement I'll try the 18" pipe wrench on the largest cog. If too tight to use without damage I'll make the 100' trek to get the tool. If its really cold or raining I'll try a little harder with the pipe wrench.
    I prefer to use a Torque Wrench and tighten the lock ring to the manufacturer's specs


  39. #39
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    I believe the thread is about chain whip substitutes. One does not need a chain whip to tighten. Of course one should tighten to specs.
    lean forward

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1niceride View Post
    I believe the thread is about chain whip substitutes. One does not need a chain whip to tighten. Of course one should tighten to specs.
    we all know that one does not need the chain whip when tightening, pic above was when loosening the lock ring. I am just curious how one can tighten the lock ring without using the torque wrench


  41. #41
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    Haven't there been other threads saying torque wrenches were pointless with cassette lockrings? The knurling on the lockring and/or smallest cog throw off the torque ratings.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Haven't there been other threads saying torque wrenches were pointless with cassette lockrings? The knurling on the lockring and/or smallest cog throw off the torque ratings.
    this is why Shimano cassettes have a thin aluminium washer on the lock ring, Sram does not. The washer unfortunately does not come separately, I just make one from an empty beer can, And drink beer while servicing the freehub

  43. #43
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    It aint no fine Swiss watch, just crank it tight- or loose according to some on this thread. No need for a torque wrench.

  44. #44
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    +1 jb

  45. #45
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    I use a strap wrench in place of a chain whip because I have one lying around that I have no other use for.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    It's not so much that it's hard to use, it's just a little awkward handling the three tools (chain whip, lock ring tool, adjustable wrench) with two hands, especially since none of them will stay in place well without being held there. Your lock ring tool with the handle welded on to it would attest to that. I suppose you have an understandable bias towards the chain whip though.
    Using a lock ring tool with a handle integrated into it is the only way to go. Weather it's mine or something inferior, it's way better than trying to fumble around with an adjustable wrench.

    Even before I made my chain whip I still preferred them over anything else I've come across. It's just such a simple and quick tool. The thing that I never liked about other whips is they are almost all made from flat bar stock,

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Haven't there been other threads saying torque wrenches were pointless with cassette lockrings? The knurling on the lockring and/or smallest cog throw off the torque ratings.
    There have. But as long as they stamp torque specs on the lock ring, some people will feel the need to torque them to spec.

    Technique with the chain whip and lock ring remover is everything.

  48. #48
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    Just get the freakin' Vise Grip, well worth the cost. LZ (Lennard Zinn) came up with the idea when he kept visiting shops where the mechanics were welding together pieces that functioned the same as the VG.

  49. #49
    gran jefe
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    Speaking of touring and simple...

    please explain for the newb? thank you.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill in Houston View Post
    please explain for the newb? thank you.
    I was wondering this as well. Maybe you can fit that nib on the lockring into the dropout and then pedal the bike, thereby rotating the freehub while the lockring is stationary? One direction tightens it, the other loosens.
    Sometimes, I question the value of my content.

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