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  1. #1
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    chain cleaner recommendation

    Id like to get one of those hand held chain brush contraptions but which one? Ive seen some for $5 and others for $50. Id rather it not break the first time i use it but Im also not running a shop and it will only get used like once a month.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Two nylon bristle brushes mounted on a metal plate with a handle and you could make one for $20.00 +/- and it would be as good if not better then 90% of the ones out there.
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  3. #3
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    I've worked at several different shops over the years and never saw anyone use any chain cleaner except this-







    -or an old toothbrush.

  4. #4
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    I use a park chain cleaner contraption ($20) and it works very well.

    Amazon.com: Park Tool Cyclone Chain Scrubber: Sports & Outdoors

    I have the brush above also and it pretty much sucks.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toff View Post
    I have the brush above also and it pretty much sucks.

    Those chain cleaning thingys are good for containing the mess made from cleaning your chain but in every other way a plain old brush is better IMO.

  6. #6
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    I like the Finish Line Grunge Brush

  7. #7
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    I've got a park chain cleaner and it's one of the better setups I've used. When I'm 'in the field' I use a water bottle that's been cut down and a paint brush. Put the bottle in the cage on the bike and paint the solvent on. Works pretty well

  8. #8
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    Every one of those chain cleaner things that cleans chains on the bike leaves a mess. I think the best solution is to get one of SRAM or other master links. $3-5. When the chain needs cleaning, remove the chain, put it into a Glad or other sealing container. Put some solvent or other cleaner in with it. Shake shake shake. You'll get 90% of it off. Now use a tooth brush and just brush off the rest. Let the chain hang from one end and use a towel to dry and then add the lube.

    For speediness, I have just hung the chain, use a can of carb or brake cleaner and spray it clean. Add lube.

    Finally, if I really want to clean it well, I use a solvent tank or my ultra-sonic cleaner. Both expensive alternatives though.

    Good luck with that.

  9. #9
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    Performance Bike chain cleaner

    This is the one I use when I want to quickly clean my chain without taking it off the bike. It is $10.99 from Performance Bike.


  10. #10
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    I spray WD40 ( I know evil stuff) onto the rag and wipe the chain down.
    Let dry.
    Apply lots of lube to the chain and re-wipe the chain.
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  11. #11
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    To clean chains I have two 1L glass jars, one of which is about half filled with mineral turps. I take the chain off (using the quick link) and chuck it in the jar. Next day, before I ride, I give the jar a good shake and the chain comes out sparkling clean. I hang it up over the jar to drip dry while I get my riding gear on. Chuck it on when I'm ready to ride with a quick lube of oil and away I go.

    If you leave the jar, all the dirt and grit will settle out of the turps. Decant into the other jar and then clean out the first jar. Use the second jar next time and repeat.

  12. #12
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    The SRAM quick link is a very handy piece. I take off the chain and sit it in a little bowl full of solvent and swish it around. Do that a couple times with new solvent and wipe clean. No brushing involved.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch35 View Post
    I like the Finish Line Grunge Brush
    These are great if you want to do a fast "grunge" clean; many bikes at camp, in between daily rides. Then wipe lube wipe, move to next rig.

    More time -at home/shop, then add: 'the quick link is great to remove chain (rotate w the other one), put in that bottle of solvent, or water and simple green'. One bottle or two for stages of cleaning.


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  14. #14
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    I have used non chlorinated brake parts cleaner with rag.

    That gets the chain squeaky clean. I then liberally apply Royal Purple MaxChain lube.

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    +1 on removing the chain and dropping it in a solvent. Just make sure it dries out (mineral spirits, my solvent of choice, evaporate pretty easily) and you lube it well afterwards. Easy to do, and works better than the on-chain cleaners (from what little experience I have with the contraptions).

  16. #16
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    +1 on the Park tool chain cleaner. I always pull the chain off the bike and scrub/dunk it, but some times it's not been enough. If the chain is really nasty I'll scrub it first, to get all the grit off the outside, then I put the chain back on the bike and run it through the chain cleaner - ends up like new!
    I've never tried mineral spirits before, but I think I will, sounds like it may be a winner.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mitzikatzi View Post


    I spray WD40 ( I know evil stuff) onto the rag and wipe the chain down.
    Let dry.
    Apply lots of lube to the chain and re-wipe the chain.
    If you need to do anything other than this then you need to re-examine your lubing procedure. Immersing in solvent dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers. Short of waxing your chain (not talking using wax lube but the oldey-timey chain waxing with paraffin), I'm not sure any method is very good at properly lubricating rollers.

    By wiping the plates clean (with a small amount of WD-40 sprayed on a rag) you preserve the lube already in the rollers. You follow this up with lubricating the chain, pedaling through a few cycles then cleaning the chain off clean again. It works great.
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    Using TigWorld's idea, I use 2 spaghetti sauce jars, one with just enough Purple Cleaner and the other with just enough of chain lube. Wipe off crud then put chain in jar with cleaner, shake and let soak if have time, hang over jar to drip and dry, put chain in lube jar, shake well, hang over jar to drip then wipe off excess.

  19. #19
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    I'm a firm believer in keeping chains on the bike. I've seen too many master links fail to trust them. Plus there isn't anything worthwhile you can do to a chain off the bike that you can't do while it's on the bike.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by siata94 View Post
    Using TigWorld's idea, I use 2 spaghetti sauce jars, one with just enough Purple Cleaner and the other with just enough of chain lube. Wipe off crud then put chain in jar with cleaner, shake and let soak if have time, hang over jar to drip and dry, put chain in lube jar, shake well, hang over jar to drip then wipe off excess.
    I think this works well when one is rotating chains. I do an average of two chains -road or MTB, to slow wear (through stretch mainly) the more expensive cassettes & (rings), also a performance kept higher/longer per session of a total swap-out.

    The KMC quicklink has been most dependable, so switching out is not a concern. So the "jar" has also been a good cleaner container to agitate and get the chain prepped for the next shift. I use an old chem bottle so I can shake really well.

  21. #21
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    I've gone from "anal chain clean/maintenance guy" to "**** it"

    I've got 7 bikes in the household between commuters, road, mountain/etc for me and the wife. I switched all the mountain bikes to Squirt Lube which is pretty clean and the road/commuter bikes run Chain-L and ProLink, whichever is handy. I wipe down the chain quickly on every bike after every ride and use that Park brush above to clean out the leaves/etc out of the cassette every now and again, and haven't actually "cleaned a chain" in forever. When I wash the bikes I throw some more water/cleaner on the chain area, but that's it.

    I measure every other ride and as soon as they get to 0.7 wear on the gauge, I toss and throw on another chain. Been working well with very little effort.

    -Tom

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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    If you need to do anything other than this then you need to re-examine your lubing procedure. Immersing in solvent dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers. Short of waxing your chain (not talking using wax lube but the oldey-timey chain waxing with paraffin), I'm not sure any method is very good at properly lubricating rollers.

    By wiping the plates clean (with a small amount of WD-40 sprayed on a rag) you preserve the lube already in the rollers. You follow this up with lubricating the chain, pedaling through a few cycles then cleaning the chain off clean again. It works great.
    I have an ultrasonic cleaner on order and am considering running my bike chain through a cycle with water as it is polar and won't dissolve the grease. A soak in WD-40 will displace all the water followed by a good wipe and application of chainlube is what I have in mind.

    Maybe excessive, but no scrubbing required and should do a significantly better job of getting the grit out of the nooks and rollers.

    I agree, if you remove the grease there is more friction, but dirt is very abrasive and if I can get the stuff out of my chain and not disturb the grease by pushing a button and walking away for 15 minutes... well, I think it's worth trying.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    If you need to do anything other than this then you need to re-examine your lubing procedure. Immersing in solvent dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers. Short of waxing your chain (not talking using wax lube but the oldey-timey chain waxing with paraffin), I'm not sure any method is very good at properly lubricating rollers.

    By wiping the plates clean (with a small amount of WD-40 sprayed on a rag) you preserve the lube already in the rollers. You follow this up with lubricating the chain, pedaling through a few cycles then cleaning the chain off clean again. It works great.
    I couldn't agree more. I have a couple of those chain cleaning devices at the shop I work at and all they do is collect dust. The times I have used them, I still have to wipe the chain down with a rag after using them. My method is simple. Isopropyl alcohol in a spray bottle, a rag, and an old tooth brush if a chain is really messy.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    If you need to do anything other than this then you need to re-examine your lubing procedure. Immersing in solvent dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers. Short of waxing your chain (not talking using wax lube but the oldey-timey chain waxing with paraffin), I'm not sure any method is very good at properly lubricating rollers.

    By wiping the plates clean (with a small amount of WD-40 sprayed on a rag) you preserve the lube already in the rollers. You follow this up with lubricating the chain, pedaling through a few cycles then cleaning the chain off clean again. It works great.
    This discussion is very similar to the never ending base cleaner versus hot scraping argument relative to ski and snowboard bases. There are few absolutes and it's an art and not a science. The anti base cleaners espouse that the cleaners 'dry out the ski and snowboard bases' and kills the the glide built up over several waxings. Others (and wax manufacturers) advocate that cleaning the bases gets rid of crap picked up from the snow, ie grease, dirt, pine pitch, etc so you can get a better bond with the next waxing.

    I think there is a middle ground/balancing act with variables for both ski bases and bike chains. It depends on where you are and ride, current conditions among other variables. Also, how much time you have and doing something is better than blowing it off entirely.

    I've taken a 'tweener' approach for both ski base and chain cleaning and 'lubing' (wax is essentially a lube). Yes grit is abrasive to chains and keeping them lubed and clean is important. So basic topical wipe downs on a regular basis is good along with re-lubing. Depending on how bad it gets simply cleaning with the lube to flush out dirt and grit may be fine for routine maintenance, coupled with a serious cleaning (on or off the bike) followed by multiple re-lubes (similar to waxing cycles) every once in a while.

    FWIW, one very avid skier and cyclist swears that putting his chain in a crock pot with ski wax (I'll need to revisit the actual mix and process on this) is a great solution for keeping the chain lubed and protected. I messed around with using fluorinated wax due to it's hydrophobic characteristics with mixed success.

    EDIT:
    I pop the master link, drop the chain into a laundry bottle and swish it around.

    Then drop the chain into 225F crockpot with wax in it. Wait until the bubbles stop - done.

    Fish it out and thread it through the dťrailleur as soon as it cools.
    A blend of ski bench scrapings, Zardoz, paraffin, and microcrystalline.

    I've a grid in the crock pot the chain sits on, the nasty bits settle out below that (except for any hairs, but those don't get in between the plates).

    Straight paraffin flakes off in the cold, need something more pliant.

    ~ 400 miles.
    Note: Zardoz = Teflon, IIRC.
    Last edited by Alpinord; 03-06-2013 at 07:40 AM.
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  25. #25
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    I'm sort of curious about this. I've never had much luck with the spray and wipe approach - it makes the outside of the chain look great, but leaves all the gunk inside the links where it is the biggest problem. After abandoning soaking chains in degreaser (it destroys them over time - they become very brittle and break), I've gone to a chain cleaner tool (typically Pedro's), and I've been satisfied with the results. However, it is messy and I have to do it outside which isn't much fun when it gets cold.

    What ultrasonic cleaner did you order? Do you anticipate that straight water will be sufficient, or are you planning to use some sort of cleaning agent with it? Please post up when you've had some experience - I'd really like to know how this works.

  26. #26
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    Rock and Roll extreme and a rag.
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnerConvert View Post
    I'm sort of curious about this. I've never had much luck with the spray and wipe approach - it makes the outside of the chain look great, but leaves all the gunk inside the links where it is the biggest problem. After abandoning soaking chains in degreaser (it destroys them over time - they become very brittle and break), I've gone to a chain cleaner tool (typically Pedro's), and I've been satisfied with the results. However, it is messy and I have to do it outside which isn't much fun when it gets cold.

    What ultrasonic cleaner did you order? Do you anticipate that straight water will be sufficient, or are you planning to use some sort of cleaning agent with it? Please post up when you've had some experience - I'd really like to know how this works.
    The one I have is a 3/4 gal. unit made by Sharpertek. The unit preheats the solution which will do a much better job of cleaning than ambient temperatures so straight water should work well, I may add a little dishwashing liquid or white vinegar.

    I'll do a follow up after I try it. The unit wasn't cheap, Harbor Freight sells one if you trust anything from the junk shop and I've seen some homemade ones out there.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by js1221 View Post
    This is the one I use when I want to quickly clean my chain without taking it off the bike. It is $10.99 from Performance Bike.

    Just used this for the first time today with some isopropyl alcohol and it worked like a charm. Shiny chain.
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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum View Post
    If you need to do anything other than this then you need to re-examine your lubing procedure. Immersing in solvent dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers. Short of waxing your chain (not talking using wax lube but the oldey-timey chain waxing with paraffin), I'm not sure any method is very good at properly lubricating rollers.

    By wiping the plates clean (with a small amount of WD-40 sprayed on a rag) you preserve the lube already in the rollers. You follow this up with lubricating the chain, pedaling through a few cycles then cleaning the chain off clean again. It works great.
    I am new to bicycling, but this makes sense to me and my mechanical engineer background. I would like to hear more opinion on submersion and the grease in the rollers. I did my first chain cleaning today with a simple but thorough wipe with a rag and then putting on some chain lube.
    Speaking of chain lube, I have only used 3-in-one oil in the past, but today the LBS guy talked me into to trying some Chain-L, and I have to say the smell reminds me of gear oil! I can see how the thicker oil might be better.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnerConvert View Post
    I'm sort of curious about this. I've never had much luck with the spray and wipe approach - it makes the outside of the chain look great, but leaves all the gunk inside the links where it is the biggest problem. After abandoning soaking chains in degreaser (it destroys them over time - they become very brittle and break), I've gone to a chain cleaner tool (typically Pedro's), and I've been satisfied with the results. However, it is messy and I have to do it outside which isn't much fun when it gets cold.

    What ultrasonic cleaner did you order? Do you anticipate that straight water will be sufficient, or are you planning to use some sort of cleaning agent with it? Please post up when you've had some experience - I'd really like to know how this works.
    I've been using the ultrasonic cleaner with great results.

    I first clean the chain with a brush and a little WD-40 followed by a wipe down with a small amount of brake parts cleaner careful not to blast it inside the rollers. At this stage the chain looks pristine.

    I fill the tank with water and add a small amount of dishwashing detergent and preheat the solution to approximately 50c or just over 120*f.

    As soon as the ultrasonics start all kinds of dirt begins to eschew out from the plates and rollers. By the time a 20min cycle has completed the tank is so murky you canít hardly see the chain at the bottom.

    After drying the chain in the oven I soak it in bar oil for an hour, wipe off the excess, and reinstall it on the bike. In service the chain runs completely silent.

    Given how clean the chain looks before running it through the cleaner and the amount of dirt in the tank after the cleaning cycle I would say this is a worthwhile investment as Iím sure the chain will be subject to much less internal abrasion wear with this type of regular maintenance.

    Far from conclusive but that has been my experience thus far.

  31. #31
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    I don't understand the crazy amount that people clean their chains. Can somebody please explain to me why you need to put so much effort into a two minute job with some degreaser and a brush followed by a rag. Are you really prolonging the life of your chain or cassette, are you getting better shifting performance, are you going twice as fast with a shiny chain?

    The other thing I don't understand is if you are going though all the trouble of taking the chain off and cleaning it in solvent are you doing anything about the cassette and chain rings as well. Because to me if you take your sparkly chain and put it back onto a grungy cassette you just wasted your time. The chain will get dirty and gritty before it even sees the trail again.
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    I don't understand the crazy amount that people clean their chains...

    The other thing I don't understand is... are you doing anything about the cassette and chain rings as well...
    First off... I usually only wipe down my chain and relube.
    Having used something like 5 different brands of lube, I have settled on T-9. It's what works for me.

    Seeing as how we have ample amounts of rain and mud where I live and mostly ride, on occasion I will either use my Park chain box cleaner or remove the chain, drop it in one of those square ice buckets from a motel room, pour in some cleaner and swish. Pour out the dirty cleaner and repeat.

    Now... I have never taken a chain apart to see how much, if any, of the grit and grime and prior lubricant I've actually removed from inside the rollers.
    I imagine most folks here have never done this either.
    I'm not sure who has ever studied the idea that using a cleaner/solvent to clean a chain... "... dissolves the grease around the rollers which is where you need the grease and doesn't flush the dirt and grit. This leaves you with more friction and the same amount of crap floating around your rollers."

    So until I see some real studies to that effect, I'll go by the amount of contaminants I see washed off and figure I actually AM cleaning the inner aspects of my chain enough to help.
    I figure the grit and grime was small enough to get in there in the first place, so unless it grew it should be small enough to come back out.

    From my mechanical training over the years, I figure if you do nothing but wipe the outside of the chain and relube it over and over again... the buildup inside creates conditions that are not conducive to a smooth running drivetrain.
    But that's just my personal, somewhat educated guess

    For my chain, cassette, pulleys, and chainrings... I will also use Isopropyl Alcohol in a spray bottle... along with the funny looking, skinny, Park brush.
    Last edited by wsmac; 04-07-2013 at 05:14 PM.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    I don't understand the crazy amount that people clean their chains. Can somebody please explain to me why you need to put so much effort into a two minute job with some degreaser and a brush followed by a rag.
    You unwittingly answered your own question save for your missing the part about degreasers washing the much needed lubricant out of critical areas like the rollers.

    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    Are you really prolonging the life of your chain
    Yes, the answer is yes in case there is any further confusion about this. The only thing more absurd than being perplexed by folks taking a thorough approach to proper maintenance is spending two minutes cleaning your chain with degreaser and thinking youíve done something worthwhile.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Richard View Post
    I've been using the ultrasonic cleaner with great results.

    I first clean the chain with a brush and a little WD-40 followed by a wipe down with a small amount of brake parts cleaner careful not to blast it inside the rollers. At this stage the chain looks pristine.

    I fill the tank with water and add a small amount of dishwashing detergent and preheat the solution to approximately 50c or just over 120*f.

    As soon as the ultrasonics start all kinds of dirt begins to eschew out from the plates and rollers. By the time a 20min cycle has completed the tank is so murky you canít hardly see the chain at the bottom.

    After drying the chain in the oven I soak it in bar oil for an hour, wipe off the excess, and reinstall it on the bike. In service the chain runs completely silent.

    Given how clean the chain looks before running it through the cleaner and the amount of dirt in the tank after the cleaning cycle I would say this is a worthwhile investment as Iím sure the chain will be subject to much less internal abrasion wear with this type of regular maintenance.

    Far from conclusive but that has been my experience thus far.
    Great feedback - thanks for posting. We are going to be finishing our basement this summer, and I'm getting a dedicated workshop out of it - I think I'm going to look into getting the ultrasonic cleaner once this is finished. Just out of curiosity, are you cleaning your cassette too?

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Richard View Post
    Yes, the answer is yes in case there is any further confusion about this. The only thing more absurd than being perplexed by folks taking a thorough approach to proper maintenance is spending two minutes cleaning your chain with degreaser and thinking youíve done something worthwhile.
    I learned my lesson a long time ago when I took my bike into the shop after it had sat idle for years and them give it a quick lookover. Among other things, they told me I needed to clean my chain. So I painstakingly cleaned all the outer surfaces so they were nice and shiny. When the shop looked at it later, they asked me why I hadn't cleaned the chain - at least the part that matters. Years later, I appreciate that it is the inner surfaces that contact the cassette and chainring teeth.

    While I routinely clean my chain with a chain cleaner (which is the easiest way I have found to get the majority of the dirt off of the inner surfaces), I am rather lazy myself in a different way - I generally favor replacing my drivetrain (cassette, chain rings, chain) every two years rather than replacing the chain more frequently. As long as I keep the chain clean and well lubricated, I don't have issues with things wearing out any more quickly than this, and replacing chains frequently enough that you can continue using them on older cassettes and chain rings seems like an expensive proposition to me.

  36. #36
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    I think you have missed some of my major point that being that I can actually clean my chain just as well with some chain cleaner solvent a brush and a rag, vs removing the chain sending money on an ultrasonic bath or soaking it overnight in some special solvent. To me it is almost going as far as Sheldon Browns chain cleaning system. The other big thing that I am asking which is the bigger question which I didn't really make clear on my post is why are you putting so much effort into the chain and nobody has said anything about the cassette which I will take off and clean a few times though the season. to me not cleaning your cassette is kind of like moping a floor then putting your muddy boots on and walking over it.

    I put in a lot of miles over the summer months I have spent a few seasons in dry dusty area's and a wax based lube was amazing. Now I have been in a fairly wet area for the last year, I have changed my lube up so it lasts a full long ride and I wash my bike (mild soap and water) after every ride when it is muddy (including the chain). So between washing the bike and spending a little extra time on the drivetrain I have not seen any problems with shifting performance or with drivetrain wear usually run two seasons on a chain and cassette which gets moved over to another bike for a few more seasons.
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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    I think you have missed some of my major point that being that I can actually clean my chain just as well with some chain cleaner solvent a brush and a rag, vs removing the chain sending money on an ultrasonic bath or soaking it overnight in some special solvent. To me it is almost going as far as Sheldon Browns chain cleaning system. The other big thing that I am asking which is the bigger question which I didn't really make clear on my post is why are you putting so much effort into the chain and nobody has said anything about the cassette which I will take off and clean a few times though the season. to me not cleaning your cassette is kind of like moping a floor then putting your muddy boots on and walking over it.

    I put in a lot of miles over the summer months I have spent a few seasons in dry dusty area's and a wax based lube was amazing. Now I have been in a fairly wet area for the last year, I have changed my lube up so it lasts a full long ride and I wash my bike (mild soap and water) after every ride when it is muddy (including the chain). So between washing the bike and spending a little extra time on the drivetrain I have not seen any problems with shifting performance or with drivetrain wear usually run two seasons on a chain and cassette which gets moved over to another bike for a few more seasons.
    I almost always clean the cassette, chain rings and chain at the same time - I agree it doesn't make sense not to. But the chain rings and cassette are IMO much easier to clean. As far as cleaning the chain - I completely agree that getting an ultrasonic bath to clean the chain and cassette are way overkill, but I've had my fair share of cleaning my bike in just above freezing weather outside in the dark, so it is a luxury I'm considering splurging on. I don't think I've broken a chain in the last 3-4 years since I've properly taken care of mine so I would say that my current system is completely sufficient as-is. But in the posts I've read where people say they just wipe down their chain - I don't see how that can do anything meaningful and that was my main point.

    Honestly, if you aren't having problems with your drivetrain then you can probably ignore this whole thread. If you are getting lots of squeaking or grinding, or if your chain breaks more frequently then you think is acceptable, then you should probably take a little more interest. I'm sure I overcompensate due to bad experiences, and I'm fine with that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    To me it is almost going as far as Sheldon Browns chain cleaning system.
    BTW - if this isn't a practical joke, then somebody has way too much time on their hands. Plus, I can't really believe that disassembling every link in the chain is good for the chain's longevity either. I just know that I don't have the patience or the free time to bother...

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    Quote Originally Posted by TurnerConvert View Post
    BTW - if this isn't a practical joke, then somebody has way too much time on their hands. Plus, I can't really believe that disassembling every link in the chain is good for the chain's longevity either. I just know that I don't have the patience or the free time to bother...

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    Read the whole page and note the date
    Didn't care enough to make it that far I guess.... Entertaining stuff though!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    I think you have missed some of my major point that being that I can actually clean my chain just as well with some chain cleaner solvent a brush and a rag, vs removing the chain sending money on an ultrasonic bath or soaking it overnight in some special solvent.
    Actually the major points being missed are:

    1) You cannot clean your chain just as well. It may look good on the outside, but the ultrasonic cleaner pulls a surprising amount of crud from the critical areas outside the reach of a brush and does so without removing the grease.

    2) Solvents and degreasers um, degrease. The ultrasonic cleaner uses water which is polar whereas grease is non polar- the dirt comes out but the grease stays in.

    3) Using an ultrasonic cleaner is more convenient. It takes more effort to manually scrub, brush and wipe the chain than it does to drop it in a tank and push a button.



    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    The other big thing that I am asking which is the bigger question which I didn't really make clear on my post is why are you putting so much effort into the chain and nobody has said anything about the cassette
    Because it goes without saying.

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    Try a can of automotive break cleaner from wal mart with a rag, the stuff will strip the grease down to the metal.

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    Re: chain cleaner recommendation

    So how long is a chain and cassette lasting for you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    So how long is a chain and cassette lasting for you?
    Iím not sure who you are addressing but if that was meant for me I presume youíre trying to infer that it doesnít help prolong chain life.

    I cannot tell you an honest answer to this as I just bought the tank. All Iíve done is to report my initial impressions, which are very promising.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jon Richard View Post
    I've been using the ultrasonic cleaner with great results.

    I first clean the chain with a brush and a little WD-40 followed by a wipe down with a small amount of brake parts cleaner careful not to blast it inside the rollers. At this stage the chain looks pristine.

    Given how clean the chain looks before running it through the cleaner and the amount of dirt in the tank after the cleaning cycle I would say this is a worthwhile investment as Iím sure the chain will be subject to much less internal abrasion wear with this type of regular maintenance.

    Far from conclusive but that has been my experience thus far.

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    just gas. i use a big canning jar and fill it with an inch or 2 of gas. put the cap on tightly and shack it until the chain is clean. after that was the chain with warm water.
    mountain biking is my passion. ill bike just about any were even it its off limits to bikers.

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    I use a Pderos Chain cleaner, works excellent with their orange cleaner. Cleans it while on the bike, rinse with water clean as a whistle.
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    I use ZEP degreaser and soak the cahin for a bit (clean the rest of the bike while it's soaking). Then take a toothbrush clean it out, rinse with some water or my air compressor and see what it looks like.

    Cassette gets the same thing with a brush until it's pretty much spotless.

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    "mountain biking is my passion. ill bike just about any were even it its off limits to bikers."

    Boo to your sig

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    Leonard Zinn recommends desiel fuel I believe for a soak

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrastories View Post
    I don't understand the crazy amount that people clean their chains. Can somebody please explain to me why you need to put so much effort into a two minute job with some degreaser and a brush followed by a rag. Are you really prolonging the life of your chain or cassette, are you getting better shifting performance, are you going twice as fast with a shiny chain?

    The other thing I don't understand is if you are going though all the trouble of taking the chain off and cleaning it in solvent are you doing anything about the cassette and chain rings as well. Because to me if you take your sparkly chain and put it back onto a grungy cassette you just wasted your time. The chain will get dirty and gritty before it even sees the trail again.
    Agreed... I never take my chain off to clean it. I use the MEC brand bio degradable chain cleaner solution and clean it, wipe it down move the chain to a much higher gear keeping wiping cassette down and front rings...it gets very muddy here in BC so cleaning a chain is quite vital.

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