Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dirtydee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    285

    cassette cleaner

    What is the best thing to use to clean a filthy cassette ?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mitzikatzi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,811
    Remove it.

    A stiff brush and degreaser.
    Duct tape iz like teh Force. It has a Lite side and a Dark side and it holdz the Universe together.

  3. #3
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,246
    Rinse and dry.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    1,642
    Removing is the best way, as the two before me said. A close second is a rag with degreaser, take an edge, line it up in between a pair of cogs, and floss.

    Gets you nowhere as clean as disassembly, but lets you go longer without pulling the mess apart. This method does not work very well with cassettes that have spiders, be warned.

  5. #5
    Just Ride
    Reputation: Cormac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,739
    brush and floss is what I do most of the time. Occasionally I'll pull it off if the bike is dirty enough to warrant such extra measures. i.e. I went mudding...but as cleaning after a mud ride is such a pain in the ass, I tend to avoid such rides. Except for a couple times a year I'll do it since it's just so damn fun!
    SS ==> Nut up or Shut up!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Mr_Clean's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    114
    Degreaser or dishwashing soap, a park tools gear brush (or any generic brush with long bristles), a garden hose set low aimed 9 o' clock posistion for rinsing.

  7. #7
    www.4estbiker.nl
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    46
    I'm using a carwash brush attached to a hose with hot water.
    Works perfect. Cleans everything but doesn't take out al the grease.

  8. #8
    MTB B'dos
    Reputation: LyNx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    17,904
    Don't even need degreaser, well unless you're a real slob and have never cleaned it before. A old rag, slid up between the cogs will get it part way there, then some HOT soapy water and a tooth brush or longer bristled brush and just go to town. As said, easiest way and only way to get it completely clean is to remove, but if not the way described will make it look shiny and new unless closely inspected and clear out any debris which would harm shifting performance.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??
    MTB Barbados
    My Phantom pics

  9. #9
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,246
    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Don't even need degreaser, well unless you're a real slob and have never cleaned it before. A old rag, slid up between the cogs will get it part way there, then some HOT soapy water and a tooth brush or longer bristled brush and just go to town. As said, easiest way and only way to get it completely clean is to remove, but if not the way described will make it look shiny and new unless closely inspected and clear out any debris which would harm shifting performance.
    As far as it goes, you pretty much wants to get dirt out of between the teeth and on the surface of the cogs where the chain can contact, plus an additional 1/8" so it doesn't get close enough to get in the chain again. Thats all you need.

    But simply taking out the cassette, cleaning it up with degreaser and a good rinse and dry will give you the best results for the less work. All depend on how dirty/greasy/muddy is the cassette and how clean you need it.
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,745
    A parts washer will bring the dirtiest cassette to a like new shine. The solvent is the best cleaner for the grimy grease.

  11. #11
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,246
    I use a bucket filled with ~1" of liquid concentrated TSP and an old toothbrush and stiff paintbrush. Dump whatever shitty part in there, soak it up, brush it down, rinse it up and wipe it down. Slap it back on the bike and enjoy a shiny bling for the next 2 miles of the ride
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by dirtydee View Post
    What is the best thing to use to clean a filthy cassette ?
    I used to use q-tips to clean the teeth, and the edge of an old dish towel to clean between the cogs. It took an hour to clean a cassette, and the results were still not great.

    Now, if I'm doing a quick clean, and the cogs are just muddy or slightly dirty, I'll spray it off in the shower while scrubbing it with a soapy brush. If they're caked with dirty oil, it's much easier and faster to remove the cassette and take it apart. Soak the cogs in hot soapy water or degreaser for about 10 minutes. Wipe off each one with a rag, then put the cassette back together. It requires an investment in some tools (lockring remover and chain whip), but the results are as good as you will ever get.
    Justin
    Salt Lake City
    2012 Specialized Stumpjumper FSR Comp 29
    2006 Specialized Allez Expert Double

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: sasquatch rides a SS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    4,745
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    A parts washer will bring the dirtiest cassette to a like new shine. The solvent is the best cleaner for the grimy grease.
    This takes me no longer than 10 minutes for even the dirtiest cassettes. Not everyone has access to this, though. You can buy smaller containers of the solvent to use at home though.

  14. #14
    Carbon or Commie?
    Reputation: axisofoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    This takes me no longer than 10 minutes for even the dirtiest cassettes. Not everyone has access to this, though. You can buy smaller containers of the solvent to use at home though.
    Hmm... maybe I need to pick up a parts washer from harbor freight... very cheap.

    What solvent do you use?
    Last edited by axisofoil; 10-18-2012 at 04:50 PM. Reason: Forgot the quote...

  15. #15
    Huckin' trails
    Reputation: David C's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Posts
    6,246
    Quote Originally Posted by axisofoil View Post
    Hmm... maybe I need to pick up a parts washer from harbor freight... very cheap.

    What solvent do you use?
    Just get a bucket or decent size container, some TSP and a good stiff brush. Cost about $15 and you're all set. You might even have a container and brush already !
    Quote Originally Posted by NicoleB28 View Post
    topless. that's what all mtb girls do. we go ride, get topless, have pillow fights in the woods, scissor, then ride home!

  16. #16
    Carbon or Commie?
    Reputation: axisofoil's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    227
    Quote Originally Posted by David C View Post
    Just get a bucket or decent size container, some TSP and a good stiff brush. Cost about $15 and you're all set. You might even have a container and brush already !
    I was asking for the person using the parts cleaner. I already use brushes and simple green... works pretty good.

    But... I WANT AN EXCUSE TO BUY NEW TOYS. So stop trying to use this logic crud on me.

  17. #17
    Hi.
    Reputation: jtmartino's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    3,869
    Quote Originally Posted by axisofoil View Post
    I was asking for the person using the parts cleaner. I already use brushes and simple green... works pretty good.

    But... I WANT AN EXCUSE TO BUY NEW TOYS. So stop trying to use this logic crud on me.
    The Orange Degreaser from Zep at Home Depot works well. It's concentrated, cheap, and effective.



    For REALLY crusty cassettes, a wooden shishkabob skewer works well for me. That's usually when I refurb old bikes that haven't been properly maintained in many years.

  18. #18
    Wanderer
    Reputation: Toff's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    834
    I use simple green and a stiff brush.

    Spray the Green. Brush and rinse. Repeat is needed.

    Works fine for me without taking off the cassette.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    1,298
    brake cleaner

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jkirkpatri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    1,230
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr_Clean View Post
    Degreaser or dishwashing soap, a park tools gear brush (or any generic brush with long bristles), a garden hose set low aimed 9 o' clock posistion for rinsing.
    This is what I do. I use a dish scrubber myself.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    2,442
    I buy old junk bikes and and fix them up as commuters. If you clean stuff regularly, a solvent tank is the best. You will need a cassette tool, a brush, a couple gallons of odorless mineral spirits.

    I dump the cassette and the chain in there and let it soak. Everything rinses away or comes right off with a old toothbrush.

  22. #22
    Ride da mOOn Moderator
    Reputation: NEPMTBA's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    7,036

    Good job!

    I do my chain and cassette at the same time!
    (more on the chain lower in the post)

    I remove them, into the Safety Clean parts cleaner they go, scrub, then hung on a wire to drip, then "low pressure" compressed air to dry.

    I know mine is a shop set up, but a lot of other responses are great too, just gotta get the grung off it.

    Again remember you have now taken all the lube out of the inner chain parts. before you relube, run your fingers over it carefully looking for stuck links and burrs, deburr with file as necessary. If using a quick link, check it, the pins get loose, if it's really old replace it now!

    While your into the area use a chain checker, check your chain for length, if it gets too long it will prematurely wear your cassette.

    Then the chain goes in a tub of 30 weight non detergent motor oil, then hung to drip and wiped off till it is dry on the outside as not to attract dirt.

    Might I add while your at it and have it off check the cassette carefully. Examine it for wear and look for burrs on teeth from the errant wrong shifting, or rock encounter, carefully take a file and deburr if you take time to do this your shifting will be much better. Do the same for your chain rings.

    Before the cassette goes on, I spray it with furniture polish, keeps grunge from sticking so easily, and smells good too...LOL I do the same for the chain rings, but be sure to cover the disc rotors with a plastic bag, don't want wax on rotors!

    You know your next step is shifting cables should be oiled if they are not the sealed kind, and check the derailleurs problems(bent, freely moving, oiled joints) and service them also. All these things work together, and depend on each other to provide a great shifting system.

    Yes, it's a lot of work and I didn't add, check bottom bracket for wear, and cranks for tightness, but I have maintained my Motos, MTBs, and anything I own with a chain, and have received much more service out of them by taking the time to do this!

    Just think a reputable shop would charge you between 100 and 200 dollars for doing all this, so if you do it yourself, go have a few beers for your reward, plus your bike will reward you with many miles of problem free fun!

  23. #23
    Dingus
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    9
    Finish Line Speed Degreaser

    This stuff works extremely well. Spray on, don't even need to scrub in many cases unless you have some really caked on grease and mud. Dries fast, and you can wipe it again if you want to remove the thin film it leaves.

    If you can't afford to keep buying cans of this stuff, then just take it off and use any degreaser + brush. I just use a tooth brush or whatever cleaning brush I have around. Don't need any bike specific cleaning tools for this job.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •