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  1. #1
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    Can anyone recommend a bearing puller/press?

    For full suspension frames? One of my bearings is gritty feeling so I was going to try pulling it, flushing it, and packing it... if that doesn't work I'll replace it. Either way, I imagine I would need a puller/press. Can anyone recommend a basic one?

  2. #2
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    No specific suggestions other than looking at RWS offerings. However, you can often flush and repack a bearing without removing it if you can expose a face of it and remove a seal.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lone Rager View Post
    No specific suggestions other than looking at RWS offerings. However, you can often flush and repack a bearing without removing it if you can expose a face of it and remove a seal.
    How do you ensure you get all the solvent (would wd40 work?) out? I wouldn't want lingering solvent just dissolving the new grease I put in.

  4. #4
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    99% isopropyl alcohol evaporates nicely within a few minutes, even faster if you can blow it out with compressed air. If you don't have compressed air, wipe off as much of it as you can with a clean rag and the rest of it will dry up pretty quickly.

    If you working outside or in a very well ventilated area, you can use a can of Speed Degreaser to blast out all the crud from the bearings. It evaporates faster than isopropyl alcohol but the fumes are pretty nasty.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius View Post
    99% isopropyl alcohol evaporates nicely within a few minutes, even faster if you can blow it out with compressed air. If you don't have compressed air, wipe off as much of it as you can with a clean rag and the rest of it will dry up pretty quickly.

    If you working outside or in a very well ventilated area, you can use a can of Speed Degreaser to blast out all the crud from the bearings. It evaporates faster than isopropyl alcohol but the fumes are pretty nasty.
    The alcohol I have is 70% so I'll get some 99%. Just pour it over, let it soak, what?

    I do have an air compressor I can use.

  6. #6
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    Pour some on the bearing, scrub with old toothbrush, wipe off with rag, repeat till clean, blow dry with compressed air.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by aerius View Post
    Pour some on the bearing, scrub with old toothbrush, wipe off with rag, repeat till clean, blow dry with compressed air.
    Thanks! I tried to +rep you but it said I have done it too many times. You must have helped me in another thread too!

  8. #8
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    when it comes to removing suspension bearings, I've used allthread, some nuts and washers, and sockets.

  9. #9
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    You can wash bike parts in whatever gets the grease off then rinse with water/detergent...as long as you can get it dry quickly. For this, I put the part in the oven. Yes it does get it really dry really quickly. Yes it does piss my wife off! No I don't care :0)

    As for taking the bearings out, I hate to sound harsh but if you can't figure out what you need you maybe shouldn't be doing it. The parts that the bearings are in are all made of aluminium and it would be really easy to mash them up if you're not careful. If you're not conversant with bearing removal and installation I'd look into getting help.

  10. #10
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    You can of course always rig something together. Probably fine for one time but if you do it several times then the right tool might be a good idea. I asked the same question a while ago on the tool forum and here is what I have learned:

    1. Blind bearings are a special case where you have access to only one side of the bearing. That might be the case for BB or hub but not normally for suspension bearings. You need a special puller and press.

    2. Uneven surfaces are another special case where conventional pull/press may not work. This may be the case for some suspension linkages.

    3. You may need one or two pull/press tools (glorified bolts) but also need a uniquely sized set of disks for each bearing size -- this can be expensive if you want to have the ability to pull/press just about any bearing. Not so bad if you are only dealing with one or two bearing sizes.

    4. RWC (enduroforkseals.com) can sell you most of the tools including bearing packs for your bike but they sure aren't cheap. Otherwise amazon carries a variety that may or may not suit your needs.

    5. Youtube and google search will yield some interesting jury-rigs -- some of them looking quite scary. I love the one where wax is pounded into the space behind a blind bearing, pushing it out...

  11. #11
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    I cant think of any frames off the top of my head that require the bearings to be pressed out to service them. Disassemble the links and just clean out the lube the bearings.

    I blast them with WD40 to remove grit, dirt and anything else like that. The WD40 does a great job of helping to breakup the grease, but it doesnt seem to do a great job of blasting out the grease. For that, alcohol in a spray bottle. A few squirts blasts the grease out in globs. No need to soak, you're not trying to dissolve it, just blast it out of the bearing. The alcohol cleans up any WD40 solvent residue, then evaporates cleanly pretty quick.

    Since frame bearings arent really spinning or anything, they really just need grease in them, and thats it. Its not like a hub bearing that needs a light/efficient grease pack. Get out as much grease as you can and stuff them absolutely full of marine grease and you're good to go.

    Most bearings are intended for some kind of spinning, like in a hub, so they dont have nearly enough grease. Frame bearings need to be packed 100% full.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Pig View Post
    You can wash bike parts in whatever gets the grease off then rinse with water/detergent...as long as you can get it dry quickly. For this, I put the part in the oven. Yes it does get it really dry really quickly. Yes it does piss my wife off! No I don't care :0)

    As for taking the bearings out, I hate to sound harsh but if you can't figure out what you need you maybe shouldn't be doing it. The parts that the bearings are in are all made of aluminium and it would be really easy to mash them up if you're not careful. If you're not conversant with bearing removal and installation I'd look into getting help.
    I do my own bottom brackets, just that honestly out of the 4 full suspension bikes I've owned, I've never kept the same one long enough for a bearing to wear out.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    I cant think of any frames off the top of my head that require the bearings to be pressed out to service them. Disassemble the links and just clean out the lube the bearings.

    I blast them with WD40 to remove grit, dirt and anything else like that. The WD40 does a great job of helping to breakup the grease, but it doesnt seem to do a great job of blasting out the grease. For that, alcohol in a spray bottle. A few squirts blasts the grease out in globs. No need to soak, you're not trying to dissolve it, just blast it out of the bearing. The alcohol cleans up any WD40 solvent residue, then evaporates cleanly pretty quick.

    Since frame bearings arent really spinning or anything, they really just need grease in them, and thats it. Its not like a hub bearing that needs a light/efficient grease pack. Get out as much grease as you can and stuff them absolutely full of marine grease and you're good to go.

    Most bearings are intended for some kind of spinning, like in a hub, so they dont have nearly enough grease. Frame bearings need to be packed 100% full.
    I have an Evil Following and the main linkage bearings are a bunch of little cartridge bearings (8 of them I think) I can spray them out just fine but the main bearing at the center pivot point, dunno how to do that one. Can't put the bike in the oven even if it would fit.

    Concerning leaving the bearings in their linkage pieces and heating them in the love (to what like 200 degrees?) that isn't going to weaken the metal somehow would it?

  14. #14
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    IMO, never use any water based solvent/cleaners on bearings as they can corrode metal and residue can degrade lubricants. Use OMS, kerosene, Speedline spray degreaser, etc... Blow the bearing out with compressed air to remove the bulk of it. Any small amount remaining will evaporate and wouldn't adversely affect the grease or bearings anyway. WD40 works pretty well (as a cleaner, not a lube) as it's cheap and is mainly OMS with some light oil.

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    200* won't affect the metal at all. Takes around 700 to start messing with temper. You powdercoat at 400 so no effects at that temp either.


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  16. #16
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    I got something like this with the smaller-size bearing pullers: http://www.amazon.com/Motion-Pro-Bea...ing+puller+set

    I also have a larger blind-puller and slide hammer for bigger stuff like BB. I figure the amazon set will pay off eventually and is something I should have gotten a few years ago.

    Some bikes seem to intend that the user can punch out or change the bearings, with relative ease. Some seem to be designed more like a "throwaway" bike that after a few seasons, you just dump, because the bearings weren't designed so that they can be easily removable. The ones in my specialized enduro seatstay were freaking insane, stupid and required a blind puller.
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  17. #17
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    Bearing tools...

    If you are still looking for the bearing tools, try the following:

    As stated earlier in the post, these aren't inexpensive...

    RapidRaceProducts Bearing Press & Extraction Tool



    Can be purchased online from Chain Reaction:
    rapidracerproducts bearingÂ* | Chain Reaction Cycles

    And from RWC:
    RRP SUSPENSION BEARING TOOLS

    Wheels Manufacturing also offers some good tools:
    Presses & Extractors

    Individual bearing extractors:
    Wheels Manufacturing Bearing Extractors

  18. #18
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    I have always thought sealed bearing maintenance was sort of an elementary skill set. No removal, just pop the seal(s), clean, inspect, lube and reinstall seal and components...go ride.

    I guess this seems like a little too much thinkin' going on here.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I have always thought sealed bearing maintenance was sort of an elementary skill set. No removal, just pop the seal(s), clean, inspect, lube and reinstall seal and components...go ride.

    I guess this seems like a little too much thinkin' going on here.
    I got them all cleaned and they feel good now, but I imagine it's only a matter of time before I have to replace the bearings and that will require a press/puller.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alias530 View Post
    I got them all cleaned and they feel good now, but I imagine it's only a matter of time before I have to replace the bearings and that will require a press/puller.
    Perhaps you are correct. However, through regular servicing and on-going preventative maintenance, I have managed to keep my originally installed bearings well in excess of 12,000 miles.

    Regular cleaning, inspection and lubrication addresses potential problems before they become problems to the point of needed replacement.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    I have always thought sealed bearing maintenance was sort of an elementary skill set. No removal, just pop the seal(s), clean, inspect, lube and reinstall seal and components...go ride.

    I guess this seems like a little too much thinkin' going on here.
    Eventually the bearings actually wear, and no amount of cleaning will fix that.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    Eventually the bearings actually wear, and no amount of cleaning will fix that.
    And, that will happen far quicker if you fail to properly maintain the bearing. Some folks prefer to replace than maintain. What ever floats your boat.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    And, that will happen far quicker if you fail to properly maintain the bearing. Some folks prefer to replace than maintain. What ever floats your boat.
    I hear you. I clean and repack my bearings.

    BTW, Does your name relate to ATC?

  24. #24
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    ^^^ ATC...As in Air Traffic Control? No, but it is aviation related.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    ^^^ ATC...As in Air Traffic Control? No, but it is aviation related.
    Ah. I was curious as a controller myself.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by boomslang64 View Post
    Ah. I was curious as a controller myself.
    I'm involved with corporate toys...
    Can anyone recommend a bearing puller/press?-visuel_facts_8x-3-i.jpg
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  27. #27
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    Found a neat little video. The bearings on your bike will be different but the same technique may be applicable.


  28. #28
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    Once you pull a cartridge bearing out, it goes in the trash. Trying to pull them out to service them and reinstalling is doing more harm than good. Exception being Chris King hub bearings when done with their tool that insures the bearing races don't get side loaded against each other.

    I've heard good things about the motion pro bearing puller, but haven't used it.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    Once you pull a cartridge bearing out, it goes in the trash.
    I must admit, I've never tried to 'service' them either. They're not murderously expensive so I bin them. If they are gritty enough to feel it there is probably some wear.

    I do pop the seals off new ones and put more grease in though. It really helps to keep the elements out. I checked the bearings on my hardtail hubs not long ago and they were still perfect. Looked like they were fitted yesterday, last time they were looked at was a year ago.

  30. #30
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    Opinion on Park tools HBP-1 tool for pressing in suspension bearings? Seems like you can combine any pilot and bushing to fit a lot of bearing sizes.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbaileyhayden View Post
    Opinion on Park tools HBP-1 tool for pressing in suspension bearings? Seems like you can combine any pilot and bushing to fit a lot of bearing sizes.
    Yeah, that's a decent bearing press, but it can be more than most might need given all of the sizes. For $300, I'll piece together the sizes that I need.

    If you're not too concerned about the expense, there are some 'works of art' out there in the same price range that I would prefer over the Park. Abby Tools and Wheels Manufacturing make some very nice presses.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Yeah, that's a decent bearing press, but it can be more than most might need given all of the sizes. For $300, I'll piece together the sizes that I need.

    If you're not too concerned about the expense, there are some 'works of art' out there in the same price range that I would prefer over the Park. Abby Tools and Wheels Manufacturing make some very nice presses.
    The issue I have is the 6800 bearing size in my Remedy's suspension linkage. WMFG does not make a drift for it, and checked at Abbey too. I wish WMFG had a drift as they sell them super cheap. RRP does make the tool/extractor at $26 /size from Chain reaction cycles, but by the time I buy all my bearing sizes and the press, I might as well buy a kit and have any size I need for other bikes in the future. I'm stuck between the Enduro BRT-005 kit and the Park tool HBP-1 (leaning this way).

  33. #33
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    I have the puller and the press that they sell on Enduro Bearing's website. I bought the press from them but got the puller on Amazon. Got it considerably cheaper.
    Works great.
    I like turtles

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    Quote Originally Posted by NYrr496 View Post
    I have the puller and the press that they sell on Enduro Bearing's website. I bought the press from them but got the puller on Amazon. Got it considerably cheaper.
    Works great.
    Which puller did you go with? Can you post the amazon link

  35. #35
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    https://www.amazon.com/Hammer-Bearin.../dp/B00G1RXHKQ

    It's EXACTLY the same one Enduro sells.
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  36. #36
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    While I'm sure there are some applications on bikes for Blind Pullers that use Slide Hammers, I have always had access to the back side to place bearing puller on and tap out with a drift. I'm guessing that you could do the same with these without having to use the slide hammer?
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    This is what I use:
    https://www.amazon.com/Bearing-Pulle...ring+extractor

    Nice to have around for other projects too. Kind of overkill if you just want a bike kit.

    I pull all cartridge bearings in my full suspension bike each year and replace. The bearings are CHEAP. With this or a similar tool there is no reason to try and reuse/lube old bearings. I HATE to be in the middle of riding season and get a suspension issue. Address it each winter and forget it for a year.

  38. #38
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    ^^^^ Perhaps this is little more than the definition of "CHEAP" or better stated as, one's disposable income level. I have over $200 of bearings and I don't see that as cheap to replace. I much prefer to service and maintain my bearing over replacement.
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    Interesting... My perspective is limited to my bike (a Scott Spark FS). The kit from spark is ~$100 but the bearings can be found for about. $3-5. The suspension has 6 bearings of which I replace 4 since they tend to get a lot of water and mud contact. That works out to $15-$20. I'd probably have a different perspective if I was looking at $200!

    The bearings I use are similar to this:
    Enduro Max 6800 Sealed Cartridge Bearing 10x19x5

    With an ID, OD and thickness I was able to match up a good option for my rig.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    ^^^^ Perhaps this is little more than the definition of "CHEAP" or better stated as, one's disposable income level. I have over $200 of bearings and I don't see that as cheap to replace. I much prefer to service and maintain my bearing over replacement.
    ^This^ I would rather maintain my bearings and use the $200 for other parts like tire's brake pads ect....
    But I've known people who don't bother to maintain and just replace parts to each their own I guess.
    ​​
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    Just curious what bike requires $200 in bearings to replace? Not trying to be critical but being able to use common components where possible is a plus. I lucked into this as my bike uses the same bearing for every pivot point and they can be had for $5 each. Figured that was a common thing.

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by RamblerBill View Post

    I pull all cartridge bearings in my full suspension bike each year and replace. The bearings are CHEAP.



    Santa Cruz Tallboy CC

    Enduro Bearing set for suspension - $75
    Headset - $30
    BB - $30
    I-9 Enduro hub set w/ freehub - $70

    not including pedals - $205
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    I prefer to use a bearing extractor that doesn't require pounding on things. Pounding with a hammer or slide hammer ruins the bearing that you extract. A gentler screw type puller doesn't (though I tend to install new bearings rather then reuse a pulled bearing, unless that's all I have around. I've had some pulled bearings last a long time.)

    The RRP puller/press is nice for suspension bearings. You can get it and the specific bearing adaptor kits from Chain Reaction in the UK for significantly cheaper than from RWS in the US.

    For wheel bearings I use a press and adaptor from Wheels Mfg.

  44. #44
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    ^^^ Agree completely. Slide hammers are fine on my vehicle, but they won't see any use on my bike.
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    I use Wheels MFG which have collets that grab the bearing, then you can pucnh the bearing out. I also use their drifts and press for hubs. For BB I have Parks BBP-1 that will do and press fit BB. and RWC drifts for linkages. May cost more, but I can get the bearings for cheap and never have to worry about damaging them putting them in.

  46. #46
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    For suspension bearing removal/pulling/installation it's hard to beat the tool from Ibis. $60
    Ripley, bearing, Clemens, tool

  47. #47
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    Agreed, this looks like a nice tool, especially for the price.

    I'm not so sure about this part of the fixture and the extraction standoffs and the way they are on the painted surface.

    Can anyone recommend a bearing puller/press?-ripley-lower-bearing-extraction.jpg
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  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    Agreed, this looks like a nice tool, especially for the price.

    I'm not so sure about this part of the fixture and the extraction standoffs and the way they are on the painted surface.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I've only used it on my Ripley and it worked pretty well. I'm going to replace the bearings on my Turner RFX this winter and will report back on the utility on a different frame.

  49. #49
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    Only one thing to remove bearings : a blind bearing puller. Don't waste your money buying something else. A blind puller is a tool to pull them all .

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by euskafreez View Post
    Only one thing to remove bearings : a blind bearing puller. Don't waste your money buying something else. A blind puller is a tool to pull them all .
    In certain instances, I can agree depending on several points. Blind extractors can have their limitations.

    If you do not have access to the back side of the bearing where you can use a drift to drive out the expanded bearing extractor, then you need a slide hammer. I am NOT a proponent of using a slide hammer on the more delicate areas of my carbon frame. Fortunately, most, but not all areas have access from the back side.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cleared2land View Post
    In certain instances, I can agree depending on several points. Blind extractors can have their limitations.

    If you do not have access to the back side of the bearing where you can use a drift to drive out the expanded bearing extractor, then you need a slide hammer. I am NOT a proponent of using a slide hammer on the more delicate areas of my carbon frame. Fortunately, most, but not all areas have access from the back side.
    I should have said that a blind puller is the ideal extracting tool for cycling. We use the one from Enduro Bearings at work and I bought a cheap chinese made for my own workshop.

    A blind puller helps so much a bike if you have to do a warranty. Or if the only thing left of the bearing is the outer cage. And I do think it's a much better solution on a push bike.

    Although, we are using something different for bottom brackets. The BB Tools from Enduro in our case. Best and safest bearing extractor for bottom brackets in my opinion. But it ain't the cheapest option .

    Regarding the press, any press from WheelsMFG or Enduro will do. We have both and they perform the same. They are the one people should consider since the both press from Park are rubbish -sorry Park's fans-.

  52. #52
    650b me
    Reputation: golden boy's Avatar
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    Oct 2008
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    Thanks to the OP for starting this thread, and thanks to all others who have contributed. Saved me from starting a thread.

    This is very timely as I am replacing all of the original suspension pivot bearings in my 2009 Pivot Mach 4. The upper link is a cool carbon wishbone design with 4 608 cartridge bearings. I have spent considerable time (on the internet) evaluating all of the options presented in this thread. IMO, the RRP press and extraction tool is clearly the best tool for this job. Pricey, yes, but worth it to keep my beloved 7 year old ride running smoothly. I'll canvas my LBSs to see what tool they have for the job, and if none meet my standards, I'll be buying the RRP tool. Thanks!

  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: DriverB's Avatar
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    Apr 2014
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    How would people rate the RWC tools vs RRP? Are the two companies related? - RWC sells some RRP stuff on their site. RWC actually uses the RRP instructions for its bearing press on its website. Perhaps it's just UK vs US versions


    http://www.enduroforkseals.com/id540.html

    http://www.rapidracerproducts.com/pr...ools/bpet.html



    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G925A using Tapatalk
    Marin County, CA

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