Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    161

    Built My Own Roll-Away Tool Cart

    For a while I've wanted to consolidate the various piles of bike parts, my cycling gear as well as the many bike specific tools I have that have settled all over my garage. I began looking around to buy something that might help me organize all of this. What I found out was that what I really wanted was a portable pegboard like the one at the back of my permanent work bench. I didn't find much out on the market to fit my needs.

    I thought I would solve all my problems by building a roll-away tool cart that would also store all of my miscellanious parts, gear and tools. Here's what I came up with:

    The entire project only took about a weekend and cost roughly $120 worth of parts, paint and bins. If you have a Harbor Freight in your town - use them. I bought the castors, small parts bin, paint brushes and a brand new pneumatic nail gun ($14) all from them. The clear bins were from Wal Mart.



    I was going to build drawers, but that would have taken another whole weekend. I settled on building out storage spaces and using clear bins (much easier, faster and cheaper)



    I was able to hang ALL of my tools on a 20" x 34" piece of pegboard.



    I've always had a ton of "small" parts. I found this bin and everything fit neatly in it. I designed the top storage spaces to specifically accomodate this bin.



    You can see - everything in it's place.



    The back - for those interested, the gap is due to making a wrong cut, But in the end it all worked out because I had to bolt through the pegboard base.



    Materials List:

    (2) 4x8 sheets of 1/2" cabinet grade plywood = $22 per
    (2) 2x2x6' boards = $7
    (1) 24" x 36" pegboard = $3.50
    (3) 1/2" x 1/2" facing strips = $9.00
    (2) 6' Slotted pieces of aluminum "L" shaped metal = $30
    (3) clear storage bins = $20
    (1) Small parts bin = $10
    (4) 4" Castor wheels = $10
    Misc bolts (castors, pegboard to base) sqrews, brads, glue and paint.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    78
    hey nice work.

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: shifturmind's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    64
    That's a VERY nice rack. I just wish I knew what half of those Park tools were for...

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,006
    Looks good ... I've been trying to figure out what details I want on a permanent workbench in my garage that'll be used equally for bikes, autos, and woodworking tool storage, and your design gives me some ideas. I especially like the work surface mat and the edging to keep things from rolling away.

    But given you made the base, what the heck is up with all the steel (don't think that is aluminum) metal strap? Particularly on the horizontal parts of the sides? Is it holding it together, armor, or for appearance? Those exposed bolt heads can lead to nasty gashes. And given you built the base, why not integrate the back in with the design, rather than strapping it on?

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    88
    Well done. I'd ask the same question: Are the aluminum L brackets holding the box together?

    Consider submitting it to Make Magazine (makezine.com). They like projects like this.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Jory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    161
    The long brackets do indeed provide a great deal of structural rigidity to the pegboard.

    This tool cart is really two parts: The rolling base and the pegboard back.

    When I bolted the pegboard to the cart it was terribly wobbly. The five foot pieces of metal strengthened the entire cart.

    Yes - had I thought about it more, I could've made the back one single piece that would run from the casters to the top of the peg board and then mounted the pegboard to the back (with a standoff frame of course).

    The two small pieces I mounted to the top of the cart provide no structural support at all. I simply had them left over from the two longer pieces I cut to size.
    Last edited by Jory; 06-17-2008 at 07:31 PM.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: MMcG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Posts
    9,031
    Awesome work - you should ad a beer bottle opener to it somewhere!

  8. #8
    Let's ride SuperModerator
    Reputation: rensho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    6,648
    Wow, that must have felt great!

    Nice job.

  9. #9
    keepin' it rural
    Reputation: summud's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    436
    i too have a drawer for lubes, but it is nothing like yours...

    sorry couldn't help myself...nice job!

  10. #10
    locked - time out
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    356
    You did a great job

  11. #11
    Big Mac
    Reputation: mbmb65's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,002
    Nice work. You're very neat!

  12. #12
    Graphic Designer
    Reputation: wiretapstudios's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    224
    Sweet work! One suggestion though, on the bottom where the shoes are, you should get some black liner (maybe like you have at the top, I can't tell what that is made of) and make a liner...so when it gets caked with mud / dirt / etc. from your shoes, you can just pull out the liner and hose it off instead of trying to stoop down and clean inside the shelf area. I'd line all the shelves personally, I think it would give it a nice 'finished' look like you have at the top.
    'Get a bicycle. You will not regret it if you live.'
    -Mark Twain

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •