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  1. #1
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    Blackburn Air Tower 1 not accurate??

    Just picked up a Blackburn Air Tower 1 with the built in gauge. Pumped up the tires to 40 p.s.i. and double checked with my pressure gauge and it read 45 p.s.i. Anyone else have an issue with these? I know the gauge wont be spot on but should be better than 5 pounds over what the gauge shows.....

    JayMac

  2. #2
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    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
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    How do you know which gauge is correct? That's the dilemma I'm always left with.

  3. #3
    My other ride is your mom
    Reputation: Maadjurguer's Avatar
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    In my experience....most lower end air pumps have pretty inaccurate gauges....anyone have one that is confirmed to be accurate.....I have a hard time plunking down major cash on a pump.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    How do you know which gauge is correct? That's the dilemma I'm always left with.
    Huh, I never really looked at it that way. I guess just use and trust the gauge on the pump??

    JayMac

  5. #5
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    JayMac, I don't know what the right answer is. I just go for consistency. I usually use the same pump on my tires. Ditto on my shocks.

    Now that I think about it, I wonder how one would go about calibrating or verifying a pressure gauge. Anyone know?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by JonathanGennick
    JayMac, I don't know what the right answer is. I just go for consistency. I usually use the same pump on my tires. Ditto on my shocks.

    Now that I think about it, I wonder how one would go about calibrating or verifying a pressure gauge. Anyone know?
    The accurate way of checking a gauge is with a "dead weight tester" It has a vertical cylinder of known diameter with fluid inside. A piston on top of the fluid has a close fit and no seals to make it frictionless. The gauge to be tested is connected to the fluid at the bottom of the piston. Accurate weights are placed on top of the piston and the piston is spun to eliminate static friction. The true pressure equals force (weight) divided by the piston area.
    To avoid injury, do not ride with your eyes closed

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