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  1. #1
    Mulleticious
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    Best value, quality wheel Truing stand?

    I want to start building my own wheels. 29ers if that makes a difference.

    I dont want to spend a fortune. Can someone recommend a good quality, but good value wheel building / truing stand please?

  2. #2
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    I got Roger Musson's excellent wheelbuilding ebook it has the designs for a wheel truing stand to build yourself - I tried it and it works very well.
    The ebook was $14 and the materials to build the stand about $15 if I remember correctly

    Wheelbuilding book for wheel building : bicycle wheels

  3. #3
    Wanderer
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    I picked up a used one. Nothing fancy but it works fine.

  4. #4
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    I have the Spin Doctor stand

    It's ok. Not super stable. But it folds up for storage. I've built at least three wheelsets using it. If I was serious I'd try to find a used park tool pro stand. I've used them and they're the balls.

    Spin Doctor Truing Stand II - Work Stands

  5. #5
    Single Speed Junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    I want to start building my own wheels. 29ers if that makes a difference.

    I dont want to spend a fortune. Can someone recommend a good quality, but good value wheel building / truing stand please?
    Best quality I would say is the P&K Lie Stand but they want a few Euro for it. Park is good but they still want a good chunk of change. If possible I'd try to find a used stand or I have seen quite a few DIY projects building a stand for a few bucks. The single bladed stands look cool and I have considered them in the past, but never got around to it.

    The Roger Musson book and plans are suppose to be well done and I have heard a bit about them.

  6. #6
    Mulleticious
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    Just bought the Musson book - thanks for the advice. Still looking for a decent (and not too expensive) truing stand though...

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    Just bought the Musson book - thanks for the advice. Still looking for a decent (and not too expensive) truing stand though...
    Seeing as you bought the book just try try building the truing stand $15~$20 nothing to lose? you may be surprised I was, I spent another $65 on tensionometer probably no need - the 3 sets of wheels I've built have been true for over 2 years.

  8. #8
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    While I realize everyone's budgets are different, Im of the adage that you buy the right tool once, and you'll have it for life. So if your serious about building your own wheels, just buy the commercially available quality tools, and be done with it. For 150-200 bucks you can have the Park TS 2.2 stand.

  9. #9
    Mulleticious
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    Quote Originally Posted by nov0798 View Post
    While I realize everyone's budgets are different, Im of the adage that you buy the right tool once, and you'll have it for life. So if your serious about building your own wheels, just buy the commercially available quality tools, and be done with it. For 150-200 bucks you can have the Park TS 2.2 stand.
    I'm with you. Normally I'd do what you say but (i) I'm not sure if I will take to wheel building, (and I've only got one set to build), plus (ii) here in the UK that stand is 235 = $360 which is almost enough for a set of wheels!

  10. #10
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    Ive built about 100 wheels with my 50 dollar spin doctor truing stand. Its not the best and it has some flaws (the runout indicators move too much) but its plenty to build flawless wheels. The more I build, the less I want to buy a different one.

    Its durable. Theres not much to it to break or anything. Im very satisfied and would recommend it.

    If I was doing nothing but building wheels all day long, 5 days a week, I might want something a little better... or more likely, Id just modify my spin doctor stand (you can thread the runout indicators so they dont move).

    Id like to build one out of nice oak. The wooden homebuilt stands look incredible to me, very artisan. They're 100% functional as well, its not a cut corner or something you'd wish was different.

  11. #11
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    I bought a used Park on eBay.

  12. #12
    turtles make me hot
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    I bought a Park 2.2 a few years ago. It's paid for itself twice over and I can't imagine using anything else.
    I like turtles

  13. #13
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    Theres a few other builders here with decades of experience and many more wheels than Ive done, and they've done many of them using a fork or chainstay.

    This is honestly a job where the outcome is completely irrelevant to the quality of the stand. You dont even need a stand at all (i strongly prefer to use one, but just for the ergonomics of it).

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    This is honestly a job where the outcome is completely irrelevant to the quality of the stand. You dont even need a stand at all (i strongly prefer to use one, but just for the ergonomics of it).

    That's not the case for me. Although I could do a full overhaul on a bike with it laying on the ground or upside down and do just as good of a job as with a repair stand it would be harder and take a lot longer. The same is true for wheel building (for me anyway) in the respect that I can build a good wheel using the frame and makeshift guides but a stand with easily adjustable ones that I can get my eyes close to make things a whole lot simpler.

    Wheel building is enough of a test for a beginner on it's own without any handicaps, especially when a decent enough stand is inexpensive or can be built for free.

  15. #15
    Mulleticious
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    Thanks for all the responses. I know the Park 2.2 seems to be most people's choice, but it's very expensive in the UK. I'm also not into making my own tools - I don't have the skills or inclination.
    So - is there a decent stand that costs say half what the Park 2.2 costs?

  16. #16
    RTM
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigwheelsRbest View Post
    Thanks for all the responses. I know the Park 2.2 seems to be most people's choice, but it's very expensive in the UK. I'm also not into making my own tools - I don't have the skills or inclination.
    So - is there a decent stand that costs say half what the Park 2.2 costs?
    Wheel Truing Station

    The stand from Feedback Sports is what you're looking for! It is fantastic. can't recommend it highly enough. sturdy and sufficient for a home builder. I too bought the musson book. The instructions for the wheel stand were clear, but I didn't need another project at the moment. For $60 (Jensonusa.com) the feedback stand is perfect. Plus, it can lock into the their work-stand as well if you want to take it on the road for trail side repairs.
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  17. #17
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    Im a bit weirded out about it being on-sided, but im sure it would work once you get used to it. Is it stiff and workable with a 20mm wheel?

  18. #18
    Mulleticious
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot View Post
    Im a bit weirded out about it being on-sided, but im sure it would work once you get used to it. Is it stiff and workable with a 20mm wheel?
    I must admit to feeling the same...

  19. #19
    Captain Climber
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTM View Post
    Wheel Truing Station

    The stand from Feedback Sports is what you're looking for! It is fantastic. can't recommend it highly enough. sturdy and sufficient for a home builder. I too bought the musson book. The instructions for the wheel stand were clear, but I didn't need another project at the moment. For $60 (Jensonusa.com) the feedback stand is perfect. Plus, it can lock into the their work-stand as well if you want to take it on the road for trail side repairs.
    I'm getting ready to get a Feedback stand (this is another reason I am leaning towards Feedback). What makes this so great? I am also getting ready to get into wheel building so thanks for recommending this.

  20. #20
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    I have the feed back stand... I started wheel building with it and it'll work,.. but it can be a pain in the butt. need to constantly flip the wheel back and forth to keep the build centered/dished easily. Yes a dishing tool is needed but flipping it keeps you from over doing it to one side or the other ... also quick release needs to be padded on the other side as most wont clamp in all the way (made to have frame on both sides)

    I do still use it.. but I actually use it to true brake rotors works great for that!!


    I'd recommend this for the beginner....

    Minoura FT-1 Wheel Truing Stand
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  21. #21
    Mulleticious
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    Quote Originally Posted by thomllama View Post
    I have the feed back stand... I started wheel building with it and it'll work,.. but it can be a pain in the butt. need to constantly flip the wheel back and forth to keep the build centered/dished easily. Yes a dishing tool is needed but flipping it keeps you from over doing it to one side or the other ... also quick release needs to be padded on the other side as most wont clamp in all the way (made to have frame on both sides)

    I do still use it.. but I actually use it to true brake rotors works great for that!!


    I'd recommend this for the beginner....

    Minoura FT-1 Wheel Truing Stand
    Now that looks better - more conventional. Thanks

  22. #22
    RTM
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    I think you'll be surprised (as I was) with the weight of the Feedback stand. It is very heavy and solid. You can true any rim/hub combo and, with a few adjustments to balance it out, it absolutely will not tip. I did find the limit when I put on my wheel WITH tire, EX.823/Hope Pro 2 w/a UST DHF. But the only reason I did that was curiosity. If I ever needed to do that again it would probably be in the field, and I'll have it locked into my workstand so no worries there. As for dish, I started out removing the wheel, testing dish, then flipping it and so forth. And thinking, "this stinks"...then I realized I could get a very good reading with my dish tool (I use the cardboard w/exacto per Musson) without removing the wheel at all. Simply check one side then the other with the rim mounted.

    Also, I never had an issue with the quick release. tough to explain in words, but the 20mm through hub, simply rests on the skewer, then when it's clamped down tight it is absolutely locked solid, perfectly level. no movement whatsoever. As with anything a little experience helps and fine tuning your procedures may make it easier to work with. I'm sure there are other great options as well.

    I don't mean to sound like a cheerleader. This is simply one of those time I went out on a limb and was actually happy with a purchase. I'm a very tough grader. By no means am I a heavy user though. I built three sets of wheels last year, but that was not normal. Going forward, maybe one set every 3-5 seasons with some tuning in between. Its a lot of fun.
    "The bitterness of poor quality remains long after the sweetness of a low price is forgotten." - Benjamin Franklin

  23. #23
    Trail Ninja
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    I got the Feedback truing stand for a little over $50. Already paid for itself in truing costs that I didn't have to pay. I've had to replace spokes 2-3 times since in my rear wheel, and I think that runs at least $15 for a job that only takes me about 15 minutes.

    Building wheels is another thing... I don't think I'd use the Feedback stand for that. I'd be looking at the Park TS2.2 in that case, following some of the wisdom mentioned earlier. I imagine using a cheaper stand like this Feedback would take a novice like myself 8 hours to get a satisfactory wheel build, whereas it might be an after-dinner thing with a quality stand. Then there's the issue of thru axles and general convenience, with different wheel sizes and wheel spacing, to think about about in the future.

  24. #24
    Trail Tire TV on blogger
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    Quote Originally Posted by RTM View Post
    I think you'll be surprised (as I was) with the weight of the Feedback stand. It is very heavy and solid. You can true any rim/hub combo and, with a few adjustments to balance it out, it absolutely will not tip. ......
    LOL.. my Velocity P-35 rims on hope 2 hubs knock that baby right over if not clamped down


    Like I said though, you guys that have the Feedback stand.. next time you throw a wheel in there for a check slide the feeler up to the brake rotor.. you'll be amazed how true you can get it with that stand...
    Going to try and bring Trail Tire TV back. go take a look... http://trailtiretv.blogspot.com/

  25. #25
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    i bought the park ts-8 and i like it. dont have much use for more. i bolted it to a 3/4 inch board and its plenty solid.

    coupled with a tensiometer and a dish tool, ive been building wheels that have kept their true for more than two years.

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