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  1. #1
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    Best Service Book?

    Hey everyone,
    I've decided to jump into the world of bike maintenance. I've always done the little stuff, but now I have a bike that I want to rebuild. I'm very mechanically inclined when it comes to cars, but bikes are new.

    All that taken into account I want a guide book, so I can learn the right way.

    The two I'm looking at are here. I'm worried the Zinn book will focus on mountianbike specific work too much as I get into road bikes, and I've also heard the images aren't the best. That's why Parktools book is the one I'm leaning towards.

    Zinn & the Art of Mountain Bike Maintenance: Lennard Zinn,Todd Telander: 9781934030592: Amazon.com: Books

    http://www.amazon.com/Park-Tool-BBB-...bicycle+repair

  2. #2
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    I've got both and a couple of others. The problem is each book I have brings something new that another book doesn't even mention, contradicts or gives better pictures or instructions. I end up having to look at different books to find what I want. The two you've mentioned are the most popular and are great books.

    My other problem is that I'm just not mechanically gifted and my LBS is 20+ miles away so if I screw up, I'm pretty much out of luck until I get up there.

  3. #3
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    Skip the books. The Park website, Youtube, and MTBR will give you all the information you need. If need be, buy a cheap $100 laptop on eBay and keep it in your workspace.
    Last edited by bad mechanic; 10-11-2012 at 09:23 AM.

  4. #4
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    Thanks Bad Mechanic, that's exactly what I was thinking I might hear. I know park tools has a ton of stuff on the site already, but I didn't know if there would be gaps somewhere.

  5. #5
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    I've always maintained my own bikes and I think Park Big Blue Book is a good resource. Google, You Tube and the Park website are useful as well.

  6. #6
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    I have many books on the subject and the park is my favorite.

  7. #7
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    Agree with the web suggestion, but there is something to be said for a real book. I got the BBB2 when I attended Park Tool School. Love it. It's only like 25 bucks or something so you can't really go wrong. I even like their method of bleeding Avid's over Avid's instruction.

  8. #8
    Hi.
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    I've read and own a ton of books. Nothing beats the help you find online.

  9. #9
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    For a REALLY comprehensive book, take a look at Barnetts manual.

    I don't have enough posts to link to it, but a google search for "the-barnett-manual" will find it.

  10. #10
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    The Zinn and an iPad works for me.

  11. #11
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    Harris Cyclery Articles Sheldon Brown's archived site always was, and still is, free. The newer technologies that have come along since he died can easily be filled in with service manuals/youtube.

    While I have the park tools book, the only thing I use it for anymore is the torque values table.

    The foundation of your knowledge should be just that--a foundation. Don't concern yourself with learning on/with something because it is complicated/published, learn from something that teaches you the basics of the mechanics of the bicycle. THAT is something that you should not need to pay for, and will allow you to apply what you've learned to new parts/technologies.

  12. #12
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    OP:I ve,use and highly recommend both the books you mentioned
    '11 Origin 8 700CX
    '14 Surly Troll

  13. #13
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    Google and YouTube - definitely !!!!!

    You can find general how-to as well as very specific info (how to rebuild a Fox DHX Air 5.0 for example). You can find specific info on components that are several years old as well as brand new. Many manufacturers also post manuals online.

    Print books are limited and may not cover new developments on components that come out next year.

    I bring my iPad (or laptop, other tablet device, etc) into my workshop and can find anything I need instantly.

    It's 2012 - print is for nostalgic purposes only !
    "If it ain't broke, don't fix it - it'll be broke soon enough !" - ILOJ

  14. #14
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    Are there any books on apple IBooks that are worth checking out?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Skip the books. The Park website, Youtube, and MTBR will give you all the information you need. If need be, buy a cheap $100 laptop on eBay and keep it in your workspace.
    +1

    I have to agree with the web advice. Even with a book (I like the Park) I often need a procedure explained in several different ways before I fully grasp it. Nothing beats the web for that.

  16. #16
    burnedthetoast
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    I look things up online when I'm really confused, but when I need something simple having the books on my workbench is nice - especially since they'll deal with the occasional greasy fingers much better than my laptop will!
    Ride to Work, Work to Live, Live to Ride

  17. #17
    Hi.
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnedthetoast View Post
    I look things up online when I'm really confused, but when I need something simple having the books on my workbench is nice - especially since they'll deal with the occasional greasy fingers much better than my laptop will!
    I have found that an iPad is a great thing to keep with me in the garage - I can play music from Pandora or Spotify and look up stuff at the same time, and it's easy to wipe any grease off the touchscreen.

  18. #18
    外国人
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    Bought a bike second hand earlier this year, disassembled it and put it all back together with a new square taper BB, new cables etc..all with only the Park Tool BBB and Youtube.
    ↑ ↑ ↓ ↓ ← → ← → B A Select Start

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by burnedthetoast View Post
    I look things up online when I'm really confused, but when I need something simple having the books on my workbench is nice - especially since they'll deal with the occasional greasy fingers much better than my laptop will!
    I put a $4 silicone keyboard cover on my cheap workshop laptop. It works great.

  20. #20
    Plays with tools
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    Be cautious of youtube videos and online advice from forums. If you don't know what your doing it's pretty easy for somebody else to sound like an expert.

  21. #21
    Ski N Bike Tech
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    Quote Originally Posted by customfab View Post
    Be cautious of youtube videos and online advice from forums. If you don't know what your doing it's pretty easy for somebody else to sound like an expert.
    Exactly!

    +1,000,000,000

  22. #22
    Ski N Bike Tech
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    Another thing to consider is your local bike shop.

    I have worked for several shops where we would offer hands on classes over the winter months.

    If you like the work they do, but want to be able to do more of your own maintenance, who better to learn from than the guys who do it day in day out.

  23. #23
    29er and 26er
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    I have some old "junk" bikes laying around that I practice on 1st.

    YouTube, this site, and Google have helped me feel more comfortable working on my bikes. On YouTube I really only study the videos that show guys using the proper tools. The other ones where guys "hack" their way through a fix I tend to ignore.

  24. #24
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    I like Mel Alwood's book, Mountain Bike Maintenance. Good starter book, lots of pictures. I use it in combination with Youtube maintenance videos. His book is a little dated, 2004 but I have been using it with success. I assume for basic maintenance this bookis sufficient but would be lacking for those who have bikes that use newer technology. It helps that this book is in my local library, so there is no cost.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Skip the books. The Park website, Youtube, and MTBR will give you all the information you need. If need be, buy a cheap $100 laptop on eBay and keep it in your workspace.
    I tend to go this route, too. After working in the shop, most basic stuff only requires part-specific reference material that can usually be found in the part manuals or the manufacturer's website (torque specs).

    Then there's the stuff I'm mechanically capable and equipped to handle but don't do often enough so I can look it up online.

    Then there's the stuff I have neither the parts nor the expertise to do, so I take it to the shop, anyway.

    And finally there's the odd stuff that doesn't show up in reference manuals but is more commonly encountered by folks with more experience than I, so I ask on the forums.

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