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  1. #1
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    Beginners Tool Kit

    Is this a reasonable tool kit for your average beginner DIYer who wants to work on his own bike... http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/145...--21-Tools.htm

    I don't need anything fancy, just enough tools that I can complete routine maintenance / replace parts.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Kits usually contain alot of tools that you will most likely never use , IMHO buy tools individually as you need them and buy quality tools that will last a lifetime . Park Tools are made in America and are of good quality that will perform for many,many years .

  3. #3
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    That makes sense, especially as I already have a pile of different size hex wrenches at home, and some other tools lying around. Its really just more specific tools (chain whip, cassette tool etc) that I do not have.

  4. #4
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    Build your own, here are some suggestions:
    -Metric Combo Wrenches, most common used are 8,9,10,15
    -Cone wrenches IF you have hubs that require them (Shimano, Formula, some Sealed Cartridge bearing), most common sizes are 13, 15, and 17
    -Metric Hex Wrench set, 1.5,2,2.5,3,4,5,6,8,10 are the most used sizes
    -8" Adjustable "Crescent" Wrench
    -#2 Phillips and 3/16" Flat screwdrivers
    -T25 Torx for rotor bolts (unless you don't have disc brakes or use Center-Lock rotors)
    -Spoke wrench(s)...Black is for DT and Wheelsmith (.127") and Red is for most Taiwan nipples (.136"). Don't get cheap multi sized ones, they strip nipples
    -Tire Levers
    -Chain Tool...don't go cheap here
    -Cable Cutters...don't go cheap here either, dykes are not cable cutters
    -Pedal Wrench...optional as many pedals have 6mm or 8mm hex sockets on the end of the axles
    -Bottom bracket wrench...get proper kind, most new bikes over $800 come with external bearing bottom brackets
    -Crank puller...optional depending on what type of crankset you got and if it has self extracting bolts.
    -Cassette lockring tool
    -Chain whip
    -Brushes for cleaning
    -Zip Ties...multiple size
    -Floor Pump...Dual head and pressure guage
    -Repair stand

  5. #5
    AZ
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    /\ that is a very good list , can this be stickied? How many think it should be stickied ? This question comes up every week or two , a stickie would simplify this .

  6. #6
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    for $46 that really isnt a bad deal. and what mtbiker is good.

    starters though, all you really need are

    L allens
    screw drivers
    pliers
    any wrenches your bike may need.
    for tune ups get a slick honey type of lube for cables and a park tool chain lube (you can use this on many things besides the chain)

    then build from there... a nice spoke wrench when you learn to true wheels, cone wrenches when you start messing with hubs, crank arm pullers & bb tools when the time comes.

    JUST REMEMBER do not try a job unless you have the right tool. working in a shop, quite often I see customers who have messed there crap up from trying to do something without the right tool

  7. #7
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    i have the same question as the topic starter...

    can anyone suggest me a good toolbox for bike maintenance?
    nothing too expensive...

    if i decide to build my own box, where can i buy the tools? online, of course...

    thanks..

  8. #8
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    Any plastic or Canvas toolbox/bag will work. I have the kit that is above and its nice because everything has a place, but everyone is right if your working on a new bike then you dont need half the stuff it comes with. The kits are very useful if you have old and new bike, which I do.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pricepoint
    The Sette Torx ST-21 is a top quality bike toolkit...
    What a load of rubbish. Does the US not have trading standards law?

    I wouldn't touch those tools unless I had nothing else. I certainly wouldn't recommend buying them.

    Buy what you *need* and spend the most you can. For basic maintenance, there's very little that a simple Hex key set (2mm-10mm) won't cover. Park Tool are good, but for genuine top quality, it's absolutely worthwhile to pay up for something like Bondhus or Wera. Cheap tools are made from lower quality materials and to lower tolerances. They break more easily, wear out more easily, and are much more likely to lead to damaged components. Just buy good quality tools once and wrench with confidence.

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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    What a load of rubbish. Does the US not have trading standards law?

    I wouldn't touch those tools unless I had nothing else. I certainly wouldn't recommend buying them.

    Buy what you *need* and spend the most you can. For basic maintenance, there's very little that a simple Hex key set (2mm-10mm) won't cover. Park Tool are good, but for genuine top quality, it's absolutely worthwhile to pay up for something like Bondhus or Wera. Cheap tools are made from lower quality materials and to lower tolerances. They break more easily, wear out more easily, and are much more likely to lead to damaged components. Just buy good quality tools once and wrench with confidence.
    No need to start anything but your in the UK, you have probably never even seen anything Sette Related, probably never even used a Torx tool. So when you come in saying that something is a load of rubbish you have not one bit of evidence to back it up. Park Tools are good tools, but how can you say they are better than something you have never used. If a tool works it doesnt matter who makes it.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  11. #11
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    So you're suggesting that the Sette kit is actually top quality? It is, you would say, comparable to, or better than, Park Tool, for instance?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    So you're suggesting that the Sette kit is actually top quality? It is, you would say, comparable to, or better than, Park Tool, for instance?
    I'm saying they work, I am not comparing them to anything because I don't own park tools. Thats why I was saying how can you compare when you in fact have never used Torx Tools. We simply cant make a comparison with out actual facts and knowledge. If I had the time, money and equipment to test the longevity and strength of Park tools VS Torx, I would. But the fact is I cant, thats just not financially possible.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  13. #13
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    You think we don't have similar kits in the UK? It's generic stuff exported to countries all over the world; it's not exclusive to the Sette brand. It's not improbable that I have actually experienced those tools, just under a different name. at the least, I'll have experienced something similar. And I don't doubt that they work, for a while, my point is that they are being advertised, traded, as being top quality.

    I have a fairly considerable experience of tools (15+ years). For both automotive and bicycles, I've used cheap tools and handled the tools that come in the sets at that kind of price point and my conclusion is represented in the attitude you find here. They're a rip off, a waste of materials and a waste of time.

    By the way, have you ever used really well-made tools? Ever handled a set of Bondhus or Wera hex keys? Ever used a really top quality ratchet driver and sockets? Ever handled workshop standard spanners?

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  14. #14
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    I'll let you know how the tools work out for me because I have and use that kit + a few other tools. If I break one I will totally come back and update everyone. I am also not a mechanic, so I dont use them very often so it might be a while. My personal thoughts are buy what you can afford if you can afford Park then go for it, if Torx are in your budget they probably wont let you down.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    Any plastic or Canvas toolbox/bag will work.


    ok, my english is bad, but not so bad.
    i thought on toolbox with toolkit inside.

    maybe something with tools for shimano's and fsa hollowtech cranks.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    I am also not a mechanic, so I dont use them very often so it might be a while...
    So you're not a mechanic; have zero experience of different grades of tools; don't even use tools very often - but you still think yourself qualified enough to be recommending tool kits to people?

    There's loads of information for beginners about buying tools, and the general consensus from those who actually have a clue is that you buy the best you can and don't buy things you don't need. Kits full of pointless tools are a false economy.

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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    So you're not a mechanic; have zero experience of different grades of tools; don't even use tools very often - but you still think yourself qualified enough to be recommending tool kits to people?

    There's loads of information for beginners about buying tools, and the general consensus from those who actually have a clue is that you buy the best you can and don't buy things you don't need. Kits full of pointless tools are a false economy.
    Actually you fail to read, I didn't suggest the kit unless he has old bikes and new bikes. I can use every tool in my kit, but I have a old road bike from the 80's and a brand new MTB this year. I can also recommend all day but I dont make accusations about tools I have never used. Torx tools work, thats really all I can say. Park Tools work also, so go forth and buy what ever you wish to buy. Just because a mechanic uses it doesnt mean a weekend warrior needs to spend twice the money.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  18. #18
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    So you wouldn't recommend that kit for people with only a modern bike? Would you say that they are unsuitable and a waste of money?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  19. #19
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    come on, guys...

    what do you think about mtnbiker72's post?
    can i build my own toolbox and not spend a fortune?
    any link?

  20. #20
    AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by devilish_dwarf
    come on, guys...

    what do you think about mtnbiker72's post?
    can i build my own toolbox and not spend a fortune?
    any link?

    Yes you can , very comprehensive list . Buy quality tools , choose wisely , you dont have to spend a fortune .

  21. #21
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    I think that it's a good list, but worth going through and prioritising the tools you do need over the tools you don't (at the moment). As I said up-thread, a great place to start is with a decent set of Hex keys. So many modern components are designed around Hex fittings, so a bike can be stripped back considerably with just a handful of tools.

    You then need to identify which components your own bike uses and search (the manual or manufacturer's website) for the necessary tools to remove and refit them. For example, the specialist tools for a Shimano HTII crankset would be the tool for removing the BB cups and the tool for the LH crank end-cap.

    With the recommendation of a dedicated pedal spanner, check first that your pedal axles don't use a Hex interface. I have a pair of pedals which only use a Hex key, so a pedal spanner would be worthless. Also, unless the gap is very small at the end of the axle, a standard 15mm spanner will work fine.

    It is my opinion - as you can see!! - that many of these pre-built tool kits are a false economy. Start with basics and then take some time to determine only what you need to keep your own bike going; buying as you go good quality examples of the tools you need.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
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  22. #22
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    Honestly... ahh I give up

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll

    Still pimpin the "We Be Toys" lineup huh .

  24. #24
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    The list above is pretty good.
    You can spend a lot without trying or you can shop around and get stuff at maybe 30-65% what it would cost if you just picked it up at the first place you find it. I like a dedicated tool box rather than a tool bag. Tool bags are for tossing a selection of tools in to carry them to the work area or on a trip. Boxes with enough room to lay stuff out makes it easier to find things and to know when something is missing.

    A standard wrench can get trapped between a lot of pedals and cranks and the wrenching flats are often just a little more narrow than a standard open end mechanics wrench. You can see a lot of folks with scars on their cranks where they scraped the cranks with the wrench or got the wrench trapped between the pedal and the crank and yanked it out while it was stuck.

    I also have pedals that have only a hex wrenching recess, but I've got several sets of pedals that have only narrow flats. Two of my bikes came with clipless pedals that required a narrow 15mm wrench just to get them off so I could change to something I like. At least one set of flats has no hex recess and they are produced by the same company that put no wrenching flats on another set of pedals.

    As a result I don't figure a pedal wrench is a waste of time.

    The toolkits aren't all bad for occasional work but they aren't the best tools either.
    Yes they will have some tools you probably won't use. That's true of just about every tool set out there including a lot of automechanics sets sometimes even basic socket sets. Does that mean it is a false economy to buy a set of sockets, combination wrenches, or screwdrivers instead of paying 50% more to buy only the individual sizes you need this minute? IMO sets for hex key wrenches, combination wrenches, screwdrivers, sockets and socket bits (hex and torx) make sense. Even if you don't use all the sizes for your bike you will probably use them for other things like your car or odd jobs around the house or shop.

    Park makes some good tools but not every Park tool is the best tool made for the job it does. Their cable cutters are very good but several folks on this forum over the past 4 years have mentioned they like other brands better. Same thing with their chainring nut wrench although I'd say there that Park could have done a much better job based on the one I've got with regards to fit.

    I started with a kit and some of the tools in it are lower quality or don't fit one or the other of my bikes but it and a few other small tool buys got me through the first year of doing basic tuning of my first mountain bike while I was TDY away from my 'real' tools and without spending a lot. I tend to shop around for stuff as I need it or as I know I'm going to need it later and I find a good deal on it.

    If you get into it and you are at least halfway decent you are going to find that you have at least one friend you are riding with who needs something tightened or a quick adjustment before you ride. Some people aren't mechanically inclined and it is faster to give them a hand than it is to wait on them when they have a mechanical on the trail. Sometimes you find a use for those odd tools you have that your bike doesn't need.

  25. #25
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    as someone who makes a living using professional tools (not bike tools) ive been amazingly let down by parks stuff. stamped steel? come on, thats some harbor freight stuff! plus a ton of their stuff isnt even made by them, its rebadged stuff from other companies.

    i think pedal wrenches are too damn long! great for a shop where you get tons of bikes with grossly over tightened pedals, but for your own bike you should get in the habit of using a t-handle or short wrench if your pedals arent hexed. since one is reverse threaded, its not really gonna come loose on its own with moderate tightening. you'll probably need one anyway, but try not to use it often.

    never buy cable cutters ever. throw them away and never look back. you can get rechargeable dremels for 12 bucks now, and its 100000000 times cleaner and nicer! no more frays or crunched inner liners, etc.

    i wouldnt even trust park torx sockets or tools. torx fasteners are funny, and ive learned my lesson with cheap ones. you only need a couple sizes, its worth buying something nice like SK, lisle are pretty good too. you could even get a snapon t25 for 5 or 10 bucks.

  26. #26
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    Most of my tools I use are Crasftsmen. Not the highest quality, but the price is reasonable and I have a Sears store within walking distance of my house. I have some cable cutters, a dremel does work quite well.

    I don't think I would buy a pre-packaged tool kit, for home or for the bike. I just buy what I need as I need it. This way you build up a good collection of tools over time.

  27. #27
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    I already had Torx and Hex bits from Craftsman in my 'automotive' tool collection.

    Cheap Harbor Freight allen wrenches aren't even close to being true and the plated ones are abominal. They aren't a bad place to get rubber gloves and foam paintbrushes and maybe tarps but other than a few sets of plyers or the like for use when you are worried about them walking off their tools aren't worth much of anything.

  28. #28
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    Because I completely agree with SteveUK on this one, I am going to suggest something from Park Tools or Pedros.

    If you are actually serious about learning to take care of your bike, you should have proper tools that will not wear out or break. I have used several versions of less expensive tools, and have have poor results. Sometimes they break, sometimes they wear therefore breaking whatever it is you're trying to fix. I will admit, they often work fine, but would you rather spend your money once or several times as you replace worn out tools?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum
    If you are actually serious about learning to take care of your bike, you should have proper tools that will not wear out or break.
    I guess I better go replace my tools then so I will be serious about taking care of my bike
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by AZ.MTNS
    Still pimpin the "We Be Toys" lineup huh .
    uhh...
    that was when I started dork!!

    NOW I run w/ this - on my back - every ride...
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    uhh...
    that was when I started dork!!

    NOW I run w/ this - on my back - every ride...

    Thats more like it .

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    I guess I better go replace my tools then so I will be serious about taking care of my bike
    How about you start by getting rid of your computer. Your feedback is not required on every dissenting post. You made your point, you like crap tools. Now let the other kids play.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by zebrahum
    Because I completely agree with SteveUK on this one, I am going to suggest something from Park Tools or Pedros.
    I should clarify that I'd only recommend Park for bike-specific tools. As do some other posters above, I find that some of their basic hand tools are a little pricey and not always comparable to those made by other tool makers. For non-bike-specific tools, a good hardware store is absolutely the place to go for both value and quality.

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    I should clarify that I'd only recommend Park for bike-specific tools. As do some other posters above, I find that some of their basic hand tools are a little pricey and not always comparable to those made by other tool makers. For non-bike-specific tools, a good hardware store is absolutely the place to go for both value and quality.
    agreed, I was focused on bike specific tools.

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  36. #36
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    Well worth the asking price .

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    ahhh, tools.

    It is a tough decision as to what to buy. Back in the day, I bought one of those smaller, less expensive kits thinking that it would be sufficient. Yes, initially, it was great, but as my repair skills grew I realized that I had to buy a few extra tools and soon, my toolbox was a complete mess with subpar tools. So, based on my needs, I just ordered the RK-41 from Treefort and they also have a less expensive AK37. Yes, its an investment, but for the most part, it contains everything you'll need for basic repairs and you will never have to replace a tool. So, its a matter of figuring out what is best for your needs. However, if I went back and did the math of my original purchase plus the tools I added (usually due to extreme frustration bc I DIDNT have it), I would have to say I would buy a decent set of tools. Again, just my 2 cents and I understand the need to save in these times! Good luck with the decision!

  38. #38
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    Another option for quality tools is to look for Wrench Force tools. These are distributed by Trek and are made by Snap-On.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsmoto
    as someone who makes a living using professional tools (not bike tools) ive been amazingly let down by parks stuff. stamped steel? come on, thats some harbor freight stuff! plus a ton of their stuff isnt even made by them, its rebadged stuff from other companies.
    I've got the Snap-on box loaded with tools, I know where you are coming from, I haven't been super impressed either. But, Park doesn't seem to have the Snap-on price tag either.

    I have a friend that has a bike shop in FL. He's a big Snap-on fan boy too, even wears the shoes. He's a car guy too, so having the tools doubles up for him. He uses his Snap-on stuff on the bikes when he needs just a regular wrench, allen socket, or whatever, but he doesn't complain about the Park stuff at all when he has to use it. He's probably just as big of a fan boy for Park in all honesty.

    I think it comes down to use and abuse. Car mechanic tools are doing more and harder work. Park seems to be the Snap-on for bikes and whatever the quality is, it seems to work fine in professional use.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by highdelll
    uhh...
    that was when I started dork!!

    NOW I run w/ this - on my back - every ride...
    Great for making a spare bike out of a downed tree when your current bike breaks. I love old Stanley tools.
    No blogs here, nothing special.....I just like to ride my bike.

  41. #41
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    Kits are good for beginners but as with most things, once you get past "beginner" stage you want to pick out your own stuff, part by part.

    As for a toolbox, I use a fishing box. I got this one from Sports Authority:
    http://www.sportsauthority.com/produ...entPage=family

    Works well when I go to races and events and I just need a couple basic tools, etc.

  42. #42
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    What about a kit from Nashbar?
    http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/st...0052_126939_-1

    All I need right now is a lockring remover, chainwhip, pedal wrench, and a chaintool. This kit has all that plus some extra stuff. I doubt I ever do any type of heavy work but I want to be able to do basic maintenence.
    If you ever see a turtle on a telephone pole, remember he had help getting there. Is there anything beer can't do?

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuckie33
    What about a kit from Nashbar?
    http://www.nashbar.com/webapp/wcs/st...0052_126939_-1

    All I need right now is a lockring remover, chainwhip, pedal wrench, and a chaintool. This kit has all that plus some extra stuff. I doubt I ever do any type of heavy work but I want to be able to do basic maintenence.
    I have a simular kit from LIFU. It was adequate for most things for the first couple years.

    When I needed a bottom bracket tool I picked up the Park one because the LIFU one didn't fit. I also needed a chainring nut wrench. I needed lockring plyers for rebuilding my fork (along with some measuring cups, a meat syringe and a couple chunks of PVC pipe). I picked up another bottom bracket tool for my new bike which used yet a different system, along with a shock pump for the air shock/fork and some additional stuff for hydraulic brakes that it used. I guess I've got maybe $150 in Park stuff now purchased online mostly on sale.

    I already had torx bits, hex bits, Dremel and other automotive tools like wrench and socket sets. Picked up a couple inexpensive torque wrenches for the fork, brake and bottom bracket stuff. Using a 3 drawer Craftsman toolbox to keep it together.

    Still use the LIFU as the travel kit.

  44. #44
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    for general tools like hex sets, wrenches, etc i wouldn't go with park tools, i'd go with Snap on or Mac. Have a mechanic cousin and says they're a step (or few) above the park brand tools.

    Bike specific tools are a different question, but many overlap, such as pedal wrenches dont need to be bike specific.
    RH SL Pro

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    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...00_20000_66004


    I just recieved this as a gift today, I asked my mother to get it for me. Not bad for a 50 dollar kit. But I am not sure what exactly all the tools do. There is a plastic circular piece on there with a little thing that looks like a gear on the back that I am clueless as to what its for. Could someone give me a breakdown of what some of these items are?

  46. #46
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    top left to bottom right.. patch kit, bottom bracket tool, crank arm puller, cone wrenches, cassette tool, external bb tool, chain whip for cassettes, pedal wrench.. uuh, spare kick stand or crack pipe? , tire lever, screw driver, metal thing, chain breaker, circle thing. oh theres a spoke wrench up top too. reasonable for 50 bucks.

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    yeah what is that circle thing?

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by DirtRider86
    http://www.performancebike.com/bikes...00_20000_66004


    I just recieved this as a gift today, I asked my mother to get it for me. Not bad for a 50 dollar kit. But I am not sure what exactly all the tools do. There is a plastic circular piece on there with a little thing that looks like a gear on the back that I am clueless as to what its for. Could someone give me a breakdown of what some of these items are?
    Going by your description, it sounds like it may be the Shimano-type crankarm adjuster that fits in the left side crank spindle and adjusts the play on the crank/bearing. I used something like that on my XT cranks when I installed them (Shimano tool).

    My brother has the Spin-Doctor chain whip and it's nothing like my Park IMO but he was able to use it just fine when he replaced his cassette. And I've got their allen key set; it works; nothing fancy. But I usually use good quality bits with a Park torque wrench and only use the allens to get the bolts started.

    Park makes a great chain tool, and I recommend their chain wear indicator for any home workshop; it should be in the most basic beginner kit. Run with a worn chain and you will cause accelerated wear to the cassette and chainrings.

    The best way to get started with a home kit is to look in the mirror. Yep, yourself. What do you plan on doing? What is your mechanical ability? If you only plan on lubing/cleaning/replacing chains and adjusting cables, just get a Park chain tool and wear indicator; chain cleaner and brushes, lube and allen wrenches. I watched my brother break a Dura-Ace 7900 front derailleur by ham-fisting it and crush a Monkeylite CF bar; I would never have him touch my bikes, frankly. I printed out all the torque specs for my bikes (two are CF and the third as CF parts) and watched videos online (Park has a great website with repair guides), and decided before I started anything, if I could actually do the job.

    Yea, you guys are all into tools but we women are all into preparation and not going beyond what we can do comfortably.
    mtnbiker72's kit is good, I would add:
    Chain wear indicator (must-have in my book)
    Feeler gauges (for some disk brakes- really makes it easy to set brakes parallel to rotor)
    Some spare parts/consumables:
    Brake/shift cables. For cable ends, I use shrink tubing; get a 3' tube and you are set for the decade.
    Spare cleat screws (if using clipless)
    Fox rear shock air service kit (if FS bike, shock will need service and it is easy)
    a few SRAM or Wipperman quick chain links.
    safety goggles/glasses.

    For more advanced work:
    Brake Bleed kit.

    If you don't have a stand, you will find that working on a rolling bike is agony. Get it hung from the rafters, or at least, use a velcro strap to wrap around and compress a brake lever so the bike does not roll around. I take one wrapped around the down tube when I go cycling, and use it on the trail to compress the brake and stop it rolling while I have the bike leaned on something.

  49. #49
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    This is a simple risk/reward question and in no way should have turned into this long of a thread.

    If the op can determine that buying cheaper quality tools possibly multiple times over the course of his/her maintenance period and still end up spending less than Park (or other name brand) then by all means save the bucks to buy food or something that is a need.

    All he wanted to know is what to get since he was going to start working on bikes. The answer was clearly stated - don't buy a kit, just buy as you need. - enough said.

  50. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsmith
    The answer was clearly stated - don't buy a kit, just buy as you need. - enough said.
    True...unless he has multiple bikes that would require most or all of those tools. Its worth looking into what he needs VS what comes in the kits. Also how much a kit costs VS buying the individual tools needed to get the job done.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  51. #51
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    the funniest part about this thread is that the op abandoned it 2 months ago - while everyone else fought about what he needed and flamed each other.

  52. #52
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    all you really need is a good heavy hammer, a solid flat-blade, some channel locks, duct tape and zipties....and of course a12-pack of the finest sub $10 pilsner
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  53. #53
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    Originally Posted by Pricepoint
    The Sette Torx ST-21 is a top quality bike toolkit...
    where is this quote? Pricepoint has a user account on these forums?
    RH SL Pro

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    where is this quote? Pricepoint has a user account on these forums?
    It is a quote from there website, not from a user named Pricepoint.

    You can make the quote box say what ever you want, see...

    Quote Originally Posted by Barock Obama
    The Sette Torx ST-21 is a top quality bike toolkit at an amazing price.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    where is this quote? Pricepoint has a user account on these forums?
    I dont know, but just trying something here - I think if you know the code you can make up any name...test below

    Quote Originally Posted by Trek Bicycle
    Testing quote from fake account...

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    You can make the quote box say what ever you want, see...

    ha - you beat me

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by GOD
    You all, just shut the fcuk up!
    amen
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    where is this quote? Pricepoint has a user account on these forums?
    I quoted that from the PP website so as to make it clear what I was referencing in my post. I was showing that PP was being fundamentally dishonest in the way it described the product, and also that Dremer03 had been caught hook, line and sinker by their bogus claims.

    In hindsight, I should have edited the box to say "originally posted by PP website".
    Last edited by SteveUK; 12-27-2009 at 06:47 AM. Reason: speeling

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dremer03
    It is a quote from there website, not from a user named Pricepoint.

    You can make the quote box say what ever you want, see...
    oh, i knew u can make anything into a quote with HTML, but just thought PP had a user here. Didn't see it so i thought it got deleted. I've been hearing some pretty bad things about Sette's tool quality. I'd stick with Mac and Snapon and Craftsman for cheapo stuff.
    RH SL Pro

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by louisssss
    oh, i knew u can make anything into a quote with HTML, but just thought PP had a user here. Didn't see it so i thought it got deleted. I've been hearing some pretty bad things about Sette's tool quality. I'd stick with Mac and Snapon and Craftsman for cheapo stuff.
    I can only tell you what I think about my own use of the tools. There are more than a handful of videos on my site of me using the tools, any one is welcome to view them and make your own opinion on how they work.

    All I can say is they simply work, I can make no claims to how long they will last. But for a home mechanic with 1 bike to tinker on I would wager a long time.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Satan
    Who wants to partay??
    ummm...yes please
    Honestly... ahh I give up

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    I quoted that from the PP website so as to make it clear what I was referencing in my post. I was showing that PP was being fundamentally dishonest in the way it described the product, and also that Dremer03 had been caught hook, line and sinker by their bogus claims.

    In hindsight, I should have edited the box to say "originally posted by PP website".
    i think you're going a little overboard with it.. they're just bike tools, not industrial machinery tools. i bet the sette kit would last the average person for years.

    the cheap tools arent that bad, and the expensive park tools arent that good.

  63. #63
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    the place to spend money on the good stuff is t-handle hex and torx wrenches. cheap ones strip fasteners.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    i think you're going a little overboard with it.. they're just bike tools, not industrial machinery tools. i bet the sette kit would last the average person for years.
    I haven't said anywhere that nobody can get any use from them. The point I make, and which are missing by a country mile, is that PP advertise these sets as, to quote, "top quality". Are they top quality? Not by any stretch of the imagination. Are they good quality? No; they are not. Are they cheap, disposable tools? Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    the cheap tools arent that bad, and the expensive park tools arent that good.
    Quote Originally Posted by One Pivot
    cheap ones strip fasteners.
    Contradict yourself much?

    What use is a philosopher who doesn't hurt anybody's feelings? -
    Diogenes


  65. #65
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    Haven't stripped a fastener or broken anything using these tools.

    Quality is a best guess, and will be better known in years to come.
    Big Foot Blue KHS XC704r

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    Contradict yourself much?
    nope! you know you quoted that out of context too, and left out the point of that i made about hex and torx tools.

    nice cheap attempt though.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by SteveUK
    I haven't said anywhere that nobody can get any use from them. The point I make, and which are missing by a country mile, is that PP advertise these sets as, to quote, "top quality". Are they top quality? Not by any stretch of the imagination. Are they good quality? No; they are not. Are they cheap, disposable tools? Yes.
    ?
    come on man.. its 2009, how are you surprised that a for-profit company overboasts their products? if you want to tackle that battle, you've got yourself a loooooooong battle.

    everyone says their crap is top quality these days. anyone with a marginal bit of common sense can put 2 and 2 together and kinda figure out why they're drastically cheaper than other tools. no ones going to be blown away when their cheap tools arent top quality.

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  69. #69
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    i just picked this up for a good price i plan on using it on my first build, it has all the tools i need for me and none of the things i dont need, except maybe a star nut setter which i need...

    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=STRK:MEWNX:IT

  70. #70
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    All you need are a good set of torches . They adjust, cut, loosen, attach, assemble, disassemble...Torches baby

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