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  1. #1
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    New Titus Motolite owner - overly active rear end

    Hi,
    I am a new Titus owner having purchased a 2010 Motolite ll over this past winter. I have been on it around the streets a bit and out on the trails just once. From these outings I am somewhat concerned/curious that the rear end is overly active. After riding for a short time I felt some noticeable bobbing so I looked down as I rode and saw that with every pedal stroke the linkage and shock were moving even on flat streets. My question to all of you very intelligent experts, is this normal?

    For the record, I have a Fox RP2 rear shock, I had it in to a reputable shock speciality shop here in Minneapolis (Shockpital) and they checked it out saying everything is in good working order. I have it set a bit above my weight at about 165lbs. My Motolite is a Medium and I am 5'10" 155lbs. I ride the seat pretty high, barely touching the ground with one toe. Not sure if all of this is relevant to helping diagnose my issue but trying to provide what info I can.

    Any thoughts would be appreciated.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    no expert.. but if everything is checked out and good... based on your "tip-toeing" could u unconsciously be raising the seat a tad too high and as a result the pedaling is yawing side to side with more force than "normal"

    What I have observed in cases like this is that excessive force gets translated each time the pedals are at the ~6 o clock position and thereby pushes the suspension down a little. If you prefer to stick with the seat height -- try to spin a little more than mash on the straights...

  3. #3
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    Yes, that is actually pretty normal and don't let it bother you. You can reduce it by increasing the rebound and that tends to slow it down. I actually once checked to see how much shock movement was actually occurring. Set your sag at whatever setting you want (but know it). While ridding on flat ground (I live on a cul-de-sac which makes this easy) push the O-ring on the shock up to the shock seal. Ride around normal like without crazy turns or jumps. Stop carefully -without compressing the shock/fork by braking. Check the O-ring for the shock usage. When I did this, I generally found about 1-2 mm of movement and that was it. For all the linkage movement (and it looks to move a ton) it is not really doing anything.

    Do not try to stop it by adding more air, that will just make for a rougher ride and do nothing for that linkage movement. Also, you need to make sure your pedaling is good. The ML likes smooth pedaling - like on a rode bike.

    For comparison, I am 6"1, 200 lbs and rode a Rp23 with 180 of air with the rebound 3 clicks from fully closed. My shock was PUSHed and used a HV sleeve with the PUSH top out bumper. I have since moved on to a Turner 5-Spot, which honestly, is not that much plusher than my old Motolite.
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  4. #4
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    I'm assuming you set the sag correctly at about 25% with the RP2 in the "open" position? Horst link designs do move while you pedal, what you have to remember is that it isnt robbing you of energy.

  5. #5
    IllumaDucati
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    Add ten pounds of air and call me in the morning.

  6. #6
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    Lower the fork to 120-130mm if you haven't already. ML needs good even weight balance and sag front to rear for climbing/pedaling.

    LAst shock I had on that bike was also RP2. The one that came stock on mine had too much travel and the seatstay bridge would smack the seat tube and crush the cable.. make sure to let the air out and sit to check bottom out clearance.

  7. #7
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    New Titus Motolite owner - overly active rear end

    Quote Originally Posted by anvil_den View Post
    no expert.. but if everything is checked out and good... based on your "tip-toeing" could u unconsciously be raising the seat a tad too high and as a result the pedaling is yawing side to side with more force than "normal"

    What I have observed in cases like this is that excessive force gets translated each time the pedals are at the ~6 o clock position and thereby pushes the suspension down a little. If you prefer to stick with the seat height -- try to spin a little more than mash on the straights...
    I was thinking along the same lines. I can make any suspension bike bob, even with the pro pedal on, if I pedal in squares.

    Normally, I get nearly no suspension movement, PP off, even on trail climbs.
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  8. #8
    Dozer
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    I remember with mine, if you actually watched the shock/rocker, it was impressive how much and how often it was moving. However, if you just look down the trail and ride, you don't really feel the movement. Just really good trail contour tracking.

    Also, get your shock Push'd. It really is worth it.

  9. #9
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    I own two Moto-lites. My wife rides the medium and I ride the large. Both have the fox RP23 and a fox talas 100mm to 140mm fork.

    First off, set the sag at 25%. Do not add air as some have suggested just to fix the slight bobbing, that is incorrect info for the Moto-lite. Again set your sag to 25% or maybe even up to 30%. My wife liked the feel of the 25% setting, and I liked the 30% sag setting on mine. She said she liked having her suspension just a tad stiffer, we tried both.

    As for the bobbing you noticed, this is normal with the Moto-lite. As was said, it doesn't rob you of much energy. The suspension is designed to be very active. This helps keep your forward momentum going over ruff terrain, such as roots and rocks by letting the suspension soak it all up as it rolls over stuff.

    Now suspension settings are a personal preference for everyone. Don't be afraid to play with the settings on your suspension. But set the sag first! Then play with all the other settings to see what you like best. I started my wife out with all the settings maxed out one way or the other. Then a few clicks at a time I would adjust things every 5 miles or so till I maxed out the settings the other way.

    She started getting a feel for what she liked in the compression and rebound department this way. Finally after a few rides she had her bike dialed in to what felt good to her. Do I like her settings, would they work for me? No way!!!! But they work for her, and that's the point.

    So play around a few rides. Don't be afraid to max out the rebound and compression, feel the difference. And don't worry about a little perceived bob when on a paved or dirt road. I promise you won't think of that bob once you are on the trail with your suspension dialed in!

    By the way, kick butt bike you picked! One of the best I my opinion. Oh and get your suspension worked on by Push if you can! It was the best money we have spent on our bikes! My wife said her bike really came alive compared to just the stock shock.

  10. #10
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    Oh I forgot, the ML came with RP2 or RP23 and the older of these shocks have a common problem.. a soggy mid stroke, which is just about where it starts after the shock sag has been set. Many have done a simple mod without blowing extra cash. Can try and see if it helps... I did mine here

  11. #11
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    With the RP2 there is quite a difference between the on/off propedal settings. I've found even with the correct sag that there is just too much 'monkey motion' for street or smooth trail riding which to me anyway is too much power lost. So, use your lever! Pointed towards the crank firms up the slow speed damping which will feel much better at the pedals, especially on roads and smooth trails. I only open the shock up on rough trails and downhills (lever pointed away from the crank). I've had my shock worked on by Push industries and am quite happy with it. The movement cannot be tuned out satisfactorily IMHO so you must use the lever when on roads and smooth trails. BTW I'm 205, 5'10" on a 2009 ML Medium. Have fun - this is a great bike that can do it all!

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