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  1. #1
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    ML2 shock reducer bushings?

    Just wondering if anyone has the specs and a source for the shock reducers and bushings for a ~2007 ML2 (RP23 rear shock)? Also, where can one obtain the tools to do the replacement?

    Thanks very much!

  2. #2
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    Get em from FOX. LBS should be able to set you up. Pull them out with a pliers is easy, press in new ones.
    bikeporn is protected speech

  3. #3
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    Ok....

    Quote Originally Posted by EvilScience
    Just wondering if anyone has the specs and a source for the shock reducers and bushings for a ~2007 ML2 (RP23 rear shock)? Also, where can one obtain the tools to do the replacement?

    Thanks very much!
    Yes... any LBS worth their salt will have these for your shock. $3-$5 / bushing.

    Now onto tools... All you need is a good socket set and a quality bolt, 2 washers and nut.

    If you have any mechanical aptitude, this is a simple repair that will cost you virtually nothing. The first time is the hardest.

    In order:
    0- remove shock from bike.
    1- find socket that is just smaller than the OD of the bushing - used to push out old bushing
    2- find socket that is just bigger than the OD of the bushing - used to capture old bushing
    3- arrange sockets accordingly and tread them thru shock eyelet - one on both sides of the shock eyelet. Use the small socket to slowly push out the old bushing into the large socket via tightening the bolt and nut. The old bushing will slide into the larger socket... you will know when you're done.
    4- remove bolt, sockets, and old bushing from shock. Clean up the shock eyelet.
    5- Now, using the AL reducers as a bushing guide, place the new bushing onto a reducer and then thread the bolt back thru the shock eyelet. Make sure you use washers to protect both the AL reducers and the shock eyelet from the spining bolt as you press in the new bushing.
    6- Here's the tough part. Lube the shock eyelet and bushing with good grease. Then, slowly press in new bushing by tightening the bolt and nut and make sure it goes in straight. If crooked in the least, start over until it goes in straight. It may take a few attempts.
    7- make sure the bushing is pressed in all the way and make sure it is not sticking out beyond the shock eyelet.
    8 - your done.



    good luck,

    EndUser
    My advice and $3 will buy you nothing more than a tunafish sandwich.

  4. #4
    11 is one louder than 10
    Reputation: Green Giant's Avatar
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    Even Easier

    drop 30 bucks on ebay - -the ones he is selling on ebay come with 2 bushings. You can do the socket method if your budget is shot, but this tool is worth it. I did the swap out in 2 minutes with a hammer.

    X-Post: Review of mtnbiker4life's shock bushing tool
    "The thing is, Bob, it's not that I'm lazy, it's that I just don't care."

  5. #5
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Yeah, good luck with the socket method. It just amazes me that someone will drop $2K+ on a mtn bike then service the shock with the WRONG tool. Using the wrong tool will likely damage or reduce the life of the bushing. But it's your bike.....just don't post back here telling us you f'd up you shock.

    I've offered this to some folks that have a limited budget. Pay for a tool and bushings then I will send you a rental tool.....use it, then send it back. And I will refund you cash minus the cost of shipping and bushings. I'm here to help any mtn biker get their rig back on the trail.

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the replies. Since I've had enough bad luck attempting bike repairs with DIY tools (and that was on an essentially worthless old steel hardtail frame...), I think I'll just order up the bushing tool from mtnbiker4life. Since these bushings were the first to go on my ML2, I suspect they'll need replacing again before the frame is dead!

  7. #7
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    Thanks.... I like your post.

    I can also remove a cork from a wine bottle with a shoe string.

    Regards,

    EndUser
    My advice and $3 will buy you nothing more than a tunafish sandwich.

  8. #8
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by EndUser
    I can also remove a cork from a wine bottle with a shoe string.

    Regards,

    EndUser
    I see your point but would you have any objections to the Lexus dealer using a pipe wrench to remove the oil drain plug or spark plugs on your IS350?

  9. #9
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    Yes I would...

    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    I see your point but would you have any objections to the Lexus dealer using a pipe wrench to remove the oil drain plug or spark plugs on your IS350?
    I would assume at $80/hr they'd be using the right tools. However, if I didn't have the right tool I'd likely try the pipewrench.

    I've been wrenching on my own bikes (and many of my family's and friend's) for 25 years... since I was 14 years old. I wasn't giving bad advice. The "socket" method works just fine if you're not hamfist. I've done this fix for 10 years on countless frames, forks, and shocks.

    Infact a friend and I were working on his wife's 9 year old Klein Adept Pro this weekend which had a bad main pivot bushing..... it was FUBAR'd. Guess how I removed it?? Then I proceeded to tell him this story and we started laughing.

    In the end, I saved him $50 and I didn't have to purchase any "specialized" tools.

    As they say.... "there's a 1000 ways to remove a bushing."

    Regards,

    EndUser
    My advice and $3 will buy you nothing more than a tunafish sandwich.

  10. #10
    The Bubble Wrap Hysteria
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    Quote Originally Posted by EndUser
    As they say.... "there's a 1000 ways to remove a bushing."
    You're correct again. But when a manufacture sets up installation procedures it typically is best to follow those which I did when I made my tool. Their is a .0004" - .0007" press fit during the installation of these DU Bushings. Over the last four years I read a few posts with ridings beeching about how the DU Bushings wear way to fast....well installing the bushing with the correct tool eliminates one of those possible wear factors along with knowing when to change the reducers.

    This is what the Bushings look like after a bad installation.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by EndUser
    I've been wrenching on my own bikes (and many of my family's and friend's) for 25 years... since I was 14 years old. I wasn't giving bad advice. The "socket" method works just fine if you're not hamfist.
    You hit it on the head. I am reasonable technically capable, but have not really done a lot of work on suspension pivots or bushings (my other main ride is a rigid singlespeed with very little to mess up - it even has an old school square taper BB and V-brakes...), and really only started doing my own bike repairs in the last few years.

    No offense was intended by not using your suggested method - I am certain it works, especially for someone with long experience. Just reducing the likelihood of me pulling a hamfisted move that ends up costing me much more time or $$ in the end.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbiker4life
    Over the last four years I read a few posts with ridings beeching about how the DU Bushings wear way to fast....well installing the bushing with the correct tool eliminates one of those possible wear factors along with knowing when to change the reducers.
    This is definately true and it seems to be compounded by low leverage suspension ratios. Trail bikes in the 5-6 inch catagory seem to be the worst.... where VPP designs eat thru DU bushings tantamount to a stoner eating a bag of cheetos.

    My Motolite goes thru about 3 DU bushings every riding season (1000 miles / yr on the trail bike). I've replaced the shock reducers, but to no effect.... still go thru 3 shock bushings a season. This being said, I'm sensitive to it and check before every ride.... a light lift on the saddle. Even the slightest amount of play, I'll change the bushing out. I have an entire bag of DU bushing in my shop.

    Regards,

    EndUser
    My advice and $3 will buy you nothing more than a tunafish sandwich.

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