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  1. #1
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    How to stop rear tire bounce when braking

    Need some help to get rid of the bounce. I'm 200lbs on my o8' ML1, I have a stock RP2 w/ the low tune @ 175 PSI.
    Last edited by jasondub08; 06-21-2009 at 03:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    Pull the Fox Manual for the RP2 shock from the Fox website and go through the insturctions step by step for proper shock setup. It sounds like your shock pressure is a little high at the moment.

    Sopwithcamel

  3. #3
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    Body language can be one solution. Try leaning back. What are the inclines, trail conditions, and your body position when it happens?

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jasondub08
    Need some help to get rid of the bounce. I'm 200lbs on my o8' ML1, I have a stock RP2 w/ the low tune @ 175 PSI.
    I am confused a bit, can you give some more info. I assume that you are feel the rear tire bounce around when you descend but only with rear brake on? Are you sitting or standing when this happens. The ML should be pretty neutral when braking.

  5. #5
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    Can the "tire bounce" be a case of too fast a rebound on the rear?

    Alternatively try lowering tire pressure first.

    If its a big vol tire, those can get a bit bouncy. I'm struggling to get a pressure setting with a nice feel up front with a new Rubber Queen 2.4.

  6. #6
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    I was riding all yesterday and was typing shatfaced late last night, so let me add some info to this. I've got 140mm Vanilla RLC, and I run my RP2 @ 175 for the more uphill trails, and @168 for the rest.

    I'm not talking about braking at speed, or locking up the rear end and whipping it around a switchback. This bike shreds that, and I don't notice any tire bounce i those sections.

    Where it happens is with low speed braking on steep, tech downhill.. Out of the saddle, weight back, almost crawling when the rear tire starts to skid it bounces/skips. Like when riding a new trail. You roll up on a new section and check everything out for the first time. It happens most when coming to a stop.

    I can amplify it by getting off the bike, locking the rear brake and pushing the bike forward using low shock pressure (168) w/ full rebound. The rear tire bounces so quickly it vibrates.. It's definitely worse when the shox fully extended.

  7. #7
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    I get a little of what u described when running the tire at a higher pressure than usual and/or when the tire is a little old and the knobs have started to harden.

    "using low shock pressure (168) w/ full rebound. " definitely would get it to bounce a little more imo

    I would try out a few different pressure or swap a rubber on the rear to see if there is any diff. Dunno if it sounds silly but personally I prefer rubbers that gives a slower rebound on the rear. Most of the WTB tires works for me in this regard. Hope it helps.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by anvil_den
    I get a little of what u described when running the tire at a higher pressure than usual and/or when the tire is a little old and the knobs have started to harden.

    "using low shock pressure (168) w/ full rebound. " definitely would get it to bounce a little more imo
    Agreed... also, it could be a case of too much initial grab on the brakes.

    Yeah, try speeding up the rebound. Sounds like the ticket... it could also be that your suspension is packing up so it hardens up and it can't track the ground.

    Make the typical curb test... ride off a curb with the rebound full open and start adding rebound until you feel it's not bucking you up. Then, back off a click or two as trail conditions require faster rebound than pavement.

    IMHO, pressure should not affect your rebound settings. Pressure controls sag. It should not be used as a band aid for poor damper performance.

    That said, I have never liked the rebound on Fox shocks, but the only one I tested was a Float. So take it for what it is, but I feel the Roco Air, the Progressive 5th Air and the Romic Twin Tube kill the Fox damping so bad it isn't funny.
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