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  1. #1
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    Fork Sag affecting the rear shock travel?

    I've a 05 RacerX with a 2006 Fox Float RLC (reduced to 100mm travel) and a RP3. Previously I was running the Float RLC at 80psi and the RP3 at 110psi ( I weigh about 180lb with my riding gear), and my fork could only get about 80mm travel, while my shock could get only about 2/3 travel. I set the sag of both at 20%.

    I was getting quite frustrated that my rear couldn't get more travel in XC/agressive trail conditions (I don't do big drops though), and I didn't like to increase the amount of sag as the bike would feel wallowy. Recently I exprimented reducing my fork to 75psi (the RP3's pressure remained the same), and to my surprise the RP3 now achieves near full travel!. My fork's travel has increased slightly, yet somehow it did not affect the initial sag.

    I'm happy as a clam now, but I'm just curious as to why reducing the air pressure of the fork would help increase the travel of the shock? Anyone with plausible (or implausible) explanations?

  2. #2
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tinier
    I've a 05 RacerX with a 2006 Fox Float RLC (reduced to 100mm travel) and a RP3. Previously I was running the Float RLC at 80psi and the RP3 at 110psi ( I weigh about 180lb with my riding gear), and my fork could only get about 80mm travel, while my shock could get only about 2/3 travel. I set the sag of both at 20%.

    I was getting quite frustrated that my rear couldn't get more travel in XC/agressive trail conditions (I don't do big drops though), and I didn't like to increase the amount of sag as the bike would feel wallowy. Recently I exprimented reducing my fork to 75psi (the RP3's pressure remained the same), and to my surprise the RP3 now achieves near full travel!. My fork's travel has increased slightly, yet somehow it did not affect the initial sag.

    I'm happy as a clam now, but I'm just curious as to why reducing the air pressure of the fork would help increase the travel of the shock? Anyone with plausible (or implausible) explanations?
    You just discovered "suspension balance". One end affects the other and make them work in harmony is a trial and error process.

    Not all riders are aware of it and shock / fork makers should make customers aware. It goes beyond putting both ends sag at the same point.
    Check my Site

  3. #3
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    Thanks Warp. Anyway now I'm so happy with my bike's performance. The rear doesn't sag as much in miminum propedal mode, and yet I get to maximise both my front and rear fork/shocks performance. Looks like I can save the money for the a new shock.

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