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  1. #1
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    Which Fork?? AM1 or Revelation

    Thinking about replacing my Minute 3 on my ML for something a bit stiffer, what do you guys think AM1 or RS revelation?? I swore I'd never by another RS product again but I have been hearing good things about it. The AM1 also seems like a great fork, but I dont need 150MM travel and I hear the travel adjustment is not on the fly, I would want to be able to keep it a 130 for climbing then extend it to 150 for decents but I hear you have to let air out, change the travel, then air it back up, this is not what I want to do. My SPV valve on my Minute has become problematic and I dont trust it anymore, anybody know if you can buy the Crossmax 20MM hub separately?? I have crossmax enduros and they dont convert to 20mm, only the Xl's and SL's do. Then I think I would go Pike all the way with the maxle. Lets hear the thoughts.

  2. #2
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    I'd recommend the Revelation- very sweet fork. However, if you want even more stiff, go with a Pike and convert your front wheel. The All Mountain 1 is a great fork but I'm not sure I dig the higher A-C height that is common on all their forks. It slackens things up too much. For 2007, they have reduced their A-C heights though so if the All Mountain 1 (as opposed to the AM1) is still available, I'd consider it. They may even have reduced it for 2006 even. If you're riding where there are a lot of rocks where deflection and being banged around is common, consider the Pike and the front wheel conversion.

  3. #3
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    Sometime last week, FM had a good review on AM1, I believe he is getting it to replace his AM SL... check it out before you decide.. happy hunting

  4. #4
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    I have an AM1 and LOVE it. The higher A-C measurement fixed exactly what I didn't like about my ML by slackening the HA a bit. If you're looking for travel adjust on the fly though if you think that's a option you'd use then go with the rev. I haven't heard a bad word yet. Actually Homebrew, who is the best versed person I know on suspension, says his new rev is at least equal to if not better than a PUSH'd Fox Talas that he previously owned. That carries a lot of wieght in my book. So I guess I would suggest the rev overall, I just got a deal I couldn't pass up on the AM1 and do not regret it.

  5. #5
    thats right living legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by mntnbiker72
    I have an AM1 and LOVE it. The higher A-C measurement fixed exactly what I didn't like about my ML by slackening the HA a bit. If you're looking for travel adjust on the fly though if you think that's a option you'd use then go with the rev. I haven't heard a bad word yet. Actually Homebrew, who is the best versed person I know on suspension, says his new rev is at least equal to if not better than a PUSH'd Fox Talas that he previously owned. That carries a lot of wieght in my book. So I guess I would suggest the rev overall, I just got a deal I couldn't pass up on the AM1 and do not regret it.

    Isn't the AM1 travel adjust, by just stopping and turning a knob under the fork leg...

  6. #6
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    Yes but doesn't the revelation come in a U-turn model? That's what I'm thinking about and consider "on the fly". I'm a set it and forget it guy anyway so I don't really worry about traval adjust.

  7. #7
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    All mountain.

  8. #8
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    Slackening the HA may be a good thing in this case but will also raise the BB height. In some cases with bikes that have high BB height, it will make the bike feel tall and tippy. I'm not saying that would happen with the Moto but it is something I would try to research with current Moto owners who are running the All Mountain I.

    Anyway, if you want the All Mountain I, remember to NOT get the AM I but to get the All Mountain I. For forks older than 2007 models, the AM I and All Mountain I are/were different models. The AM I is a lower-end model while the All Mountain I is the one that reviews and rates highly. Some Ebay sellers sell the AM I fork and type "All Mountain I" or type both model names so make sure before you buy. I rarely buy off Ebay anymore since my favorite board vendors have great prices but I will warn you about this.

  9. #9
    "El Whatever"
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    I haven't been on a Revelation, but I have an AM1 which is a terrific fork.

    Its best virtues are also sometimes a curse, depending on where/what you ride.

    Set it at 130mm (or whatever the least travel available is possible, on mine is 137mm) and be happy. The long a2c will keep things in check on descents and the ETA on the climbs. That means you have the "descend" and "climb" travel settings.

    The TAS (travel adjustment) is simple to use, but not on the fly. You can't adjust you geometry for the specific terrain at least on the fly. You're set at 130mm or 520mm a2c for tight singletrack or open wide turns, which require slightly different "ideal" set-ups.

    Basically, you have to push your fork down and move the knob to achieve whatever travel you want to be set at. Your sag will be affected a bit too, so maybe you'd like to adjust for the desired sag, but there are people who don't.

    On the flats, the fork rides rather low and it's buttery smooth... which is good. However, this will get you bobbing. Here comes the TST... nice! Problem solved!! But you sacrifice a bit of small bump compliance. I prefer the AM to DS settings and consider the other two remaining settings unusable for MTB use and even on road they're a bit harsh unless you like a locked out suspension.

    The oil level has to be accurately set on the ETA... otherwise you either can't get the ETA working or the thing doesn't allow you to use all the travel.

    As I said... I see those all as virtues, but I like to be honest and some people may be turned away by those "details".

    The chassis is very stiff in all directions with a tiny weenie bit of flex fore-aft (no, it ain't bushings, before you ask). The finish of the stanchions and paint is sturdy, but I kinda miss the stainless steel protectors the Maguras have. Your QR will leave marks on it relatively soon.

    In a nutshell... I love it.
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  10. #10
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    It really depends on what you're looking for in a fork. If you're looking for a buttery smooth coil goodness and not concerned about putting on a 5+ lbs fork or raking out the bike, the AM1 is all that and a bag of chips. If you're just looking for something that works much better than a Minute and only 130mm, the Revelation is a good bet. If you don't mind the extra cost/effort of switching to a 20mm wheel and you want a bit more travel, I'm sure the Pike would be a great addition. The new front wheel is the only thing that kept me from buying a Pike.

    I know some folks have put a 150mm fork on the ML but I imagine it's more work to climb, negotiate high speed turns, tight switchbacks, etc. I'm not saying it can't be done but it's certainly going to take more effort. The bottom bracket is already fairly high at 130mm (higher than most bikes in the sub 6" class). Personally, I wouldn't go over 140mm on the ML.

    YMMV
    Long Live Long Rides

  11. #11
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    I have the AM1 on my ML and it's a great fit. The higher AtoC does slacken the angle a bit but it's not a big deal. I ride mine @ 140mm. The trails I ride are pretty rugged so it feels nicer to have have bit more travel and some slackness. As far as the adjustable travel goes it's not on the fly. You can do it pretty easily but you have to get off the bike and you may have to adjust the sag, depending on how picky you are. I've found that 5.5 inches of travel is plenty on this fork when it's setup properly. For the climbs the ETA and TST help depending on what you're doing. For long fireroad climbs the ETA rocks, for singletrack stuff the TST settings help. Overall it's a great fork for this bike.

    I don't have any experience with the Revelation so I cannot compare.

  12. #12
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    I have the Revelation Uturn currently, and it's a great match for the RP23. Both allow an amazing range of tuning options, great for set&forget people, but also good for tinkerers like myself. Great plushness without too much brake dive. The major benefit of the Uturn IMHO is that you can get the HA geometry exactly where you want it to be. If you're looking for a fork that will offer significantly different rides for different terrain, the range of the Rev probably isn't adequate: the 140mm or 150mm of the Pike and Marz AllMtn give you a lot more to play with. I'm hoping to get one of these in the near future so that I have a swap-out option for a SuperD/All Mountain setup. But for most of the riding I do, the Revelation is ideal.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by budgie
    I have the Revelation Uturn currently, and it's a great match for the RP23. Both allow an amazing range of tuning options, great for set&forget people, but also good for tinkerers like myself. Great plushness without too much brake dive. The major benefit of the Uturn IMHO is that you can get the HA geometry exactly where you want it to be. If you're looking for a fork that will offer significantly different rides for different terrain, the range of the Rev probably isn't adequate: the 140mm or 150mm of the Pike and Marz AllMtn give you a lot more to play with. I'm hoping to get one of these in the near future so that I have a swap-out option for a SuperD/All Mountain setup. But for most of the riding I do, the Revelation is ideal.

    Agree - a great fork and probably perfect for lighter riders.


  14. #14
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    Bad rap for the Talas

    I hear what you guys are saying, but after riding today I gotta say I love the 07 Talas. Specifically I love the three position travel switch (100, 120, 140). Reach down and boom! I'm all set for climb, level, and descent. Plus I can send it away to Push and make it even better. Am even thinking about getting a second one for the Blade.

    Long live Fox!

  15. #15
    FM
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    Quote Originally Posted by barelylegal
    Sometime last week, FM had a good review on AM1, I believe he is getting it to replace his AM SL... check it out before you decide.. happy hunting
    The All Mountain 1 has arrived and looks awesome... having ridden my friends I know I'll love it.

    Having said that, my All mountain SL really blew my mind last ride. It's incredibly plush at high speeds- I center-punched a few good size rocks and the SL just soaked them up. The air feels great on big hits too, nice and progressive. I expect the All mountain 1 will perform similarly, perhaps better at low speeds, a bit heavier, but the main bonus is a2c adjustibility.

    And that's really what it's all about. Like Mtnbiker72, I find the ML's head angle to be a bit steep for the trails I descend on, with the forks titus suggests. The all mountain SL I was riding felt perfect length-wise for the techy downhills and was super light at 4.5lbs. Going to the 1 means I can use the ETA and TST adjustments to lower and/or lock the front end, while the TAS adjustment will allow me to fine-tune the length to suit the ride. 130mm for pure xc rides, 140 for long downhills, maybe I'll even try the full 150mm for some rides. including the ETA adjustments, I can dial the a2c anywhere between 488 and 538mm. The perfect length for any ride!

  16. #16
    thats right living legend
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    The perfect length for any ride!


    Never minde...

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    The All Mountain 1 has arrived and looks awesome... having ridden my friends I know I'll love it.

    Having said that, my All mountain SL really blew my mind last ride. It's incredibly plush at high speeds- I center-punched a few good size rocks and the SL just soaked them up. The air feels great on big hits too, nice and progressive. I expect the All mountain 1 will perform similarly, perhaps better at low speeds, a bit heavier, but the main bonus is a2c adjustibility.

    And that's really what it's all about. Like Mtnbiker72, I find the ML's head angle to be a bit steep for the trails I descend on, with the forks titus suggests. The all mountain SL I was riding felt perfect length-wise for the techy downhills and was super light at 4.5lbs. Going to the 1 means I can use the ETA and TST adjustments to lower and/or lock the front end, while the TAS adjustment will allow me to fine-tune the length to suit the ride. 130mm for pure xc rides, 140 for long downhills, maybe I'll even try the full 150mm for some rides. including the ETA adjustments, I can dial the a2c anywhere between 488 and 538mm. The perfect length for any ride!
    FM, just out of curiosity, how do you get those 50mm adjustment (538mm-488mm)?. I was considering the All Mountain 1 but it seems to me that you were able to adjust the travel (and hence the A2C) 20mm, by mean of the TAS. Certainly, 488-538 covers more of my needs (if not all). Could you please elaborate on it a little more?

  18. #18
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    I think he's also calculating for the ETA. The ETA lets you dop the fork via a lever, and a push on the bars. It will get really low which is awesome for climbing. So, you have the 20mm (130-150) adjustment with the TAS. And then a separate ETA lever that will drop the fork even more. The ETA is not really adjustable though and really a one way valve.

  19. #19
    FM
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcgrath
    I think he's also calculating for the ETA.
    True, more or less....

    so for the marzocchi Z series forks, the a2c's are like:
    130mm travel = 518mm a2c
    150mm travel = 538mm a2c
    so what I was figuring is that the ETA locks down a max. of 75mm into the travel, so that would give you about 445mm a2c. that would be like a 72 degree head angle!

    One thing I noticed about the all mountain 1: You have both compression lock-out (TST) and rebound lock-out (ETA). So you can play these against each other, to lock your fork out at any length you like: Put on the ETA, compress the fork as little or as much as you like (the amount of weight you put on the bars will determine how much it compresses), then engage the TST to full CL (lock-out) mode. I thought this was pretty cool, one of my motivavations to get the all mountain 1.

  20. #20
    Veni Vidi Vici
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    Quote Originally Posted by FM
    The All Mountain 1 has arrived and looks awesome... having ridden my friends I know I'll love it.

    Having said that, my All mountain SL really blew my mind last ride. It's incredibly plush at high speeds- I center-punched a few good size rocks and the SL just soaked them up. The air feels great on big hits too, nice and progressive. I expect the All mountain 1 will perform similarly, perhaps better at low speeds, a bit heavier, but the main bonus is a2c adjustibility.

    And that's really what it's all about. Like Mtnbiker72, I find the ML's head angle to be a bit steep for the trails I descend on, with the forks titus suggests. The all mountain SL I was riding felt perfect length-wise for the techy downhills and was super light at 4.5lbs. Going to the 1 means I can use the ETA and TST adjustments to lower and/or lock the front end, while the TAS adjustment will allow me to fine-tune the length to suit the ride. 130mm for pure xc rides, 140 for long downhills, maybe I'll even try the full 150mm for some rides. including the ETA adjustments, I can dial the a2c anywhere between 488 and 538mm. The perfect length for any ride!

    G'Day FM, Thanks for the info, please advise your experience with the AM 1 after several rides and kindly tell what the difference in riding it will have vis-a-vis AM SL. I might change if there will be significant improvement it will have.

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