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  1. #1
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    Bike Mag reviews the FTM

    Check out the link to see the full scoop on the FTM. For those of you wary of MBA reviews this is a good alternative.

    Enjoy!

    http://titusti.com/07/press/09FTM_BikeMag.pdf

  2. #2
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    The FTM got a great review Jeff. It's nice to see hard work pay off.

    Bike magazine complained of brake fade on the Marta SL disc brakes. Scrub components is offering Aluminum metal matrix rotors that weigh half the weight of the standard 410 stainless steel rotors. They also have 7 times the heat transfer of the standard stainless steel rotors. Heat is the main cause of fade.



    http://www.scrubcomponents.com/index.html

    Also Kudos for switching the the 30.9 - diameter seat post. Trek (34.0), Specialized, Scott (34.9) and Cannondale have gone to large diameter seat posts. The whole industry is going to start up sizing seat posts diameters as they do more frame optimization and here is why. Look at the Euler Bucking Equation.

    F= (pie^2*E*I)/(K*L)^2

    F= maximum or critical force (vertical load on column)
    L = Effective Length
    I = Area Moment Of Inertia or Second Moment of Area.
    E= Modulus Elasticity
    K= 2

    Reference http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buckling

    We can see looking at the Euler Equation the two biggest factors are Modulus of Elasticity and the Second Moment of Area. So that means the larger the diameter of the seat post, the larger the load the seat post can take without buckling (bending). Therefore large diameter high modulus carbon fiber seat posts will most likely become the norm for XC and trail riding. If it wasn’t for the amazing Thompson seat posts, we would probably be there all ready.

    I had a though about how to getting more lateral stiffness from the chainstays. Probably the ultimate solution is building Chainstays of High Modulus Carbon Fiber, but that is expensive. Another way to go might be to use an aluminum metal matrix materials that has a higher modulus of elasticity then standard aluminum. Perhaps the boys and girls at Griffen Bicycles might be able to help you out. Here is the URL.

    http://www.griffenbike.com/mmc.asp

    Jeff, it appears in the race for Carbon Fiber everyone forgot about the Metal Matrix Aluminum alloys.

    Cheers,

    Sopwithcamel

  3. #3
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    Having ridden a racer X for the past 4 years I have to say I was not impressed with the FTM. To each his own.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

    http://www.austinbike.com

  4. #4
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    Another review with absolutely no pining for the Motolite! I get the impression that Titus has done well making their new frame. I'm hoping I get to find out for myself on the weekend!

    I have to take issue with the build, though. $6200 and 27lb? Whiskey tango foxtrot!? Seems to me that getting rid of some of that XC carbon bling and spec'ing a better wheelset (at least welded rims!) could have saved a pound and $1000. Numbers that look good on paper...

  5. #5
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    Highs and Lows

    My favorite part was in the LOWS- Lacks quick release seat collar.
    Not exactly a deal breaker.

    And you can easily build it lighter than 27 pounds for less than the published price.

  6. #6
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    Hey sop. I ride with a guy who bought the Scrubs. He used them with '09 Marta SL's for a month. They screamed the whole time and the combo didn't come close to the power my SL's have with the wavy's or the drilled Magura rotors that I use now. They are freakishly light though. YMMV.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikerbob.com
    And you can easily build it lighter than 27 pounds for less than the published price.
    I agree Bob, my Large Ti FTM weighs in at 25.5 pounds. The test bike could shave over a pound by swapping the Hevagals for for some Mountain Kings or Racing Ralphs.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blofeld
    spec'ing a better wheelset (at least welded rims!)
    I have to take the blame for the wheels. This build kit featured is our standard Mountain Kit III build and the stock wheels are 240 hubs and 4.2 (welded) rims. I was surprised when Bike called me for a fact check and told me the bike had our Kit II wheel which is a 370/430 combo. I'm sure if the correct wheel set was on the bike it would have come in close to a pound or so lighter. I apologize if this was misleading in anyway.

  9. #9
    what's that rattle?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus Jeff
    I'm sure if the correct wheel set was on the bike it would have come in close to a pound or so lighter.
    Makes sense...the other anomaly on the build was that Brodie bar. Not that it's particularly heavy but it's doesn't seem like a good value for the weight as compared to Easton, RF, etc.

    Hard to say if any of these changes would have changed much with the review and it's bizarre speculation re. seatposts and clamps. I wonder how the XTR kit would have fared...

  10. #10
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    BIKE missed out

    Too bad the Crank It Up FTM wasn't available to them. Did BIKE get the same bike as MBA to test?

    Here's a modified CIU in white.
    I had been waiting patiently to get that build kit and just added the wheels and blue ano bolts and hanger to my white demo bike. Love the Cobalts to handle and look at close up.

    Under 26# in large.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
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    Dayum Bob, that is one sexy bike. Can't imagine the final total$ with the CB's, spendy for sure...but sexy as hell.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Titus Jeff
    I have to take the blame for the wheels. This build kit featured is our standard Mountain Kit III build and the stock wheels are 240 hubs and 4.2 (welded) rims. I was surprised when Bike called me for a fact check and told me the bike had our Kit II wheel which is a 370/430 combo. I'm sure if the correct wheel set was on the bike it would have come in close to a pound or so lighter. I apologize if this was misleading in anyway.
    I don't know why some reviewers spend a lot of effort critizing components on a bike that usually is sold frame only. Well, I do understand that they have to consider the package that the dealer delivered and it's imposible (or nearly so) to completely isolate performance of the frame.

    Anyway, I think that MBA also review the FTM, this or last month.

  13. #13
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    Crank It Up special

    Quote Originally Posted by ebeer
    Dayum Bob, that is one sexy bike. Can't imagine the final total$ with the CB's, spendy for sure...but sexy as hell.
    The CIU FTM special gives you the Cobalts and other blue bits, along with some Eggbeater SL (in blue) at no extra cost. Just get the regular Kit 2 which retails for $4795.

    They substitute the Cobalts instead of DT 370s.

  14. #14
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    Hey Orthorex.......

    Thanks for the input on the Scrub rotors. I am hoping your friend botched the break in of his Rotors or is not running the proper Kool Stop Organic Pads. From what I have read it's critical to do a proper break in of the Scrub Rotors. Scrub Components even says so in the "Scrub Component Tech Manual". Twice!


    http://www.scrubcomponents.com/Scrub...anual%20v1.pdf

    Quote:

    "It is critical to follow the break-in instructions carefully to get the most
    from your new rotors! Failure to do so may introduce noise in the system,
    or reduce the overall stopping power of your brake setup."


    I am going to follow these MTBR forums for a while to see how they are doing in actual field tests.

    Scrub Components Brake Rotors

    Scrub Components Rotors

    Sopwithcamel

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sopwithcamel
    Hey Orthorex.......

    Thanks for the input on the Scrub rotors. I am hoping your friend botched the break in of his Rotors or is not running the proper Kool Stop Organic Pads. From what I have read it's critical to do a proper break in of the Scrub Rotors. Scrub Components even says so in the "Scrub Component Tech Manual". Twice!


    http://www.scrubcomponents.com/Scrub...anual%20v1.pdf

    Quote:

    "It is critical to follow the break-in instructions carefully to get the most
    from your new rotors! Failure to do so may introduce noise in the system,
    or reduce the overall stopping power of your brake setup."


    I am going to follow these MTBR forums for a while to see how they are doing in actual field tests.

    Scrub Components Brake Rotors

    Scrub Components Rotors

    Sopwithcamel
    Actually, it's critical for any brake. Magura also strongly advises to follow up their procedure.

    Not doing so leads to unwanted noise, glazing, lack of power, rapid wear, etc.

    This is specially critical for new rotors too... heck, even after a good clean you normally need to bed in the brakes as some of the compound of the brake pad over the rotor is gone.
    Check my Site

  16. #16
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by sopwithcamel
    Also Kudos for switching the the 30.9 - diameter seat post. Trek (34.0), Specialized, Scott (34.9) and Cannondale have gone to large diameter seat posts. The whole industry is going to start up sizing seat posts diameters as they do more frame optimization and here is why. Look at the Euler Bucking Equation.
    Cheers,

    Sopwithcamel
    They arrive a few years late... my 2004 Switchblade is 31.6mm dia....

    Heck, my Giant Warp 2003 was 30.9 too...

    It was explained by Chris Cocalis back in the day that the ML was 27.2 as a compromise to have the 5" travel out of that rear end AND keep the straight seat tube.

    Having all the travel and the seatpost diameter is why the EG and the FTM went to in front of the seat tube yokes to get to the shock. That, in turn, needs stiffer chainstays as they are longer without any support until you get to the yoke. That explains why it is massive on the EG and the obvious jump to full carbon and the peculiar shape of the chainstays on the FTM to get the weight and the stiffness where they wanted too.

    Clever design... makes me to want one. It solves all the issues with the ML, though my tastes are for something more in between the EG and the FTM. Less lycra than the FTM and less body armor than the EG.

    To each their own, but I'd love to have both the FTM and the EG.
    Check my Site

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    ...though my tastes are for something more in between the EG and the FTM. Less lycra than the FTM and less body armor than the EG.
    Like the Titus Endorphin?
    Extreme stationary biker.

  18. #18
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    Like the Titus Endorphin?
    I've always thought that the Endo is a trailbike with an identity crisis...



    .... but so do I.

    Yeah, pretty much like the Titus Endorphin. Or an FTM with a beefed up rear and coil over shock. No, that's not an El Guapo. More like a Switchblade with uninterrupted seat tube and dialed to modern forks.
    Check my Site

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    I've always thought that the Endo is a trailbike with an identity crisis........
    Is that why so many ML went for the Endo?

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by rzozaya1969
    Is that why so many ML went for the Endo?
    No, it is because people who bought the Endo are complete morons.


    Extreme stationary biker.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    Like the Titus Endorphin?
    Yes, but a heavy EG build is a light Endo build, is it not?

    Warp, you could just build the EG and make it "light" and you would have it all.

  22. #22
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus
    Yes, but a heavy EG build is a light Endo build, is it not?

    Warp, you could just build the EG and make it "light" and you would have it all.
    You still get a 6" rear end that you may not use 90% of the time and I'd have to shell out a grand for a 160mm fork.

    I don't have the steep terrain I used to. Otherwise, I would have no seconds thoughts about the EG.

    Right now, the FTM/ML is a more sensible choice to me.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    You still get a 6" rear end that you may not use 90% of the time and I'd have to shell out a grand for a 160mm fork.
    The Endorphin has the weight of a Guapo with the Travel of an FTM - is that what you mean by identity crisis? I think the ability to run a 160mm fork on the Endo is what really sets it apart from other 140mm trailbikes, the amount of Lyrics and 36s on the Knolly board seems to support this opinion. But yes, a Pike is a better fit for an Endo or FTM than a Guapo.

    As for not using the 6" rear end, the Guapo is a bully. It finds faster and rougher lines in all sorts of places then pushes you from behind when you lean over to have a look.

  24. #24
    "El Whatever"
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blofeld
    The Endorphin has the weight of a Guapo with the Travel of an FTM - is that what you mean by identity crisis? I think the ability to run a 160mm fork on the Endo is what really sets it apart from other 140mm trailbikes, the amount of Lyrics and 36s on the Knolly board seems to support this opinion.
    Exactly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blofeld
    But yes, a Pike is a better fit for an Endo or FTM than a Guapo
    Indeed... If the EG would have a rather tall BB, then I'd give it a shot.

    Quote Originally Posted by Blofeld
    As for not using the 6" rear end, the Guapo is a bully. It finds faster and rougher lines in all sorts of places then pushes you from behind when you lean over to have a look.
    Sounds really nice. But my terrain is flat as a, well, a huge flat surface...
    Check my Site

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warp
    Indeed... If the EG would have a rather tall BB, then I'd give it a shot.



    Sounds really nice. But my terrain is flat as a, well, a huge flat surface...
    Two incongruous statements.

    WTF would you need a "rather tall BB" for a "huge flat surface"? Makes no sense to me. I'll repeat my FB statement; Has the sweltering Qatar heat caused your brain to swell?
    Extreme stationary biker.

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