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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by 50calray View Post
    What's the difference between a Trail 5 and a Trail 7? I picked up a new 2013 Cannondale Trail 7 for $500.00 from a local bike store. Since you're in Dallas, I've got it for sale, $400 if you're interested.
    If I am going used, I am going to get a superior fork out of the deal. If I am going with a low end Suntour, I am going to buy from my LBS and get some warranty out of it. Thanks for the thought, I am tempted to go to the $900 range new and look at Mamba, Cannondale trail sl4 or Giant Talon....all of those are right in that range.
    ITs funny, I look at everyone listed with numerous bikes and it sounds like 'cat ladies'. It starts off with one and one day you have a dozen.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangyman View Post
    Stay away from the pre trek gary fishers. I had a2009 xcal that cracked and luckily was able to get it replaced on the lifetime warranty. I don't think you would be as luck buying second hand as the lifetime warranty only applies to the original owner unless you can find a lbs that will help you out.
    THis is my fear.....

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by salscott View Post
    THis is my fear.....
    Well any frame can crack but some more than most like the old Fishers. Buying used you will get a lot more for your money. If I were you and new to the sport, I would find myself a $200 bike and ride it for a quarter. If you still love the sport after 3 months than go get something in the $1500 price range and use the old bike as a buddy bike.

  4. #54
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    Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by tangyman View Post
    Well any frame can crack but some more than most like the old Fishers. Buying used you will get a lot more for your money. If I were you and new to the sport, I would find myself a $200 bike and ride it for a quarter. If you still love the sport after 3 months than go get something in the $1500 price range and use the old bike as a buddy bike.
    I have that $200 bike...it's a pos. I'm ready to move on, after a little more seat time.

  5. #55
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by tangyman View Post
    Well any frame can crack but some more than most like the old Fishers. Buying used you will get a lot more for your money. If I were you and new to the sport, I would find myself a $200 bike and ride it for a quarter. If you still love the sport after 3 months than go get something in the $1500 price range and use the old bike as a buddy bike.
    That's what i did. Except my new bike was 3k. -.-

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  6. #56
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    Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by mjduct View Post
    I'm sorry bud, but everything you describe there is some form of user error/ bad preparation... not the fault of the equipment at all...

    Full Disclosure: I have a set of stans 355's with hutchison pythons that I've put stans in 3 times and been running without issue for 2 years, the only time they drop air is when the temperature changes drastically... My new bike is rolling on Hans Dampfs on Stans FLOW EX's seated with a floorpump. all the goofy ass gorilla tape, bastardized cut up tube stuff is for the birds, if you save 20 bucks on the setup and waste 3 hours getting it to work, you've just valued your time at $7.33/ hour which is less than minimum wage. (my buddy trying to follow a forum tubeless setup instead of going with the kit from the get go)

    buy the right pieces and make the upgrade, you'll never go back. And probably never need to change a flat again either...
    My gorilla tape method has had zero issues and was a breeze to setup. Regardless of what method you choose, proper setup will lead to a better system than tubes. Proper setup includes wheels and tires. I prefer the wtb universal bead profile with a strip of gorilla and any tire you want so long as it isn't a super light thin sidewall race tire. To each his own.
    "Your opinion may vary, but it's stupid." -Rich Dillen

  7. #57
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    I am interested (nervous) in these sidewall rips I keep hearing about. Is this something that occurs much more with tubeless set-ups? I've been riding since 2005 and I have never had a sidewall tear with tubes (knock on wood).

  8. #58
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    Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by smokehouse4444 View Post
    I am interested (nervous) in these sidewall rips I keep hearing about. Is this something that occurs much more with tubeless set-ups? I've been riding since 2005 and I have never had a sidewall tear with tubes (knock on wood).
    No, sidewall tears are on both sides of the spectrum. Regardless of tubes or tubeless sidewall tears are going to happen.
    "Your opinion may vary, but it's stupid." -Rich Dillen

  9. #59
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by smokehouse4444 View Post
    I am interested (nervous) in these sidewall rips I keep hearing about. Is this something that occurs much more with tubeless set-ups? I've been riding since 2005 and I have never had a sidewall tear with tubes (knock on wood).
    Yes it occurs Alot! Keep running tubes they are great!

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  10. #60
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    Wow, that's so funny. Ha Ha. First ride on the tubeless Yeti today out at Reimers Ranch. Tubeless and the new style Racing Ralphs were awesome. I don't know if it was more one than the other, or a little of both, but I certainly had more grip (and confidence) in the turns...and it was hauling ass! Ran it through a lot of the baby head sections and no problemo. If everything continues to go smoothly, I'll probably change the 29er over in about a month.

  11. #61
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    Quote Originally Posted by smokehouse4444 View Post
    Wow, that's so funny. Ha Ha. First ride on the tubeless Yeti today out at Reimers Ranch. Tubeless and the new style Racing Ralphs were awesome. I don't know if it was more one than the other, or a little of both, but I certainly had more grip (and confidence) in the turns...and it was hauling ass! Ran it through a lot of the baby head sections and no problemo. If everything continues to go smoothly, I'll probably change the 29er over in about a month.
    Yep, its awesome.

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  12. #62
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    Update on this whole tubeless thing. I went ahead and had the Stumpy FSR 29er converted to tubeless along with the Yeti 26er. Can anyone say "Dufus". I am just in awe of how much better tubeless is than tubes. I ride in some fairly rough, rocky stuff quite a bit, and have not had one problem whatsoever. Much better ride quality, much less perceived rolling resistance, no flats. The other day I came back from Muleshoe and as I rolled the bike into the garage I noticed what looked like something stuck to the tread of the front tire. I pulled it off, and a thorn came sliding out that was about an inch long. It was straight into a knobby, and immediately air started rushing out. I kinda pushed on it a bit, but ended up just letting it go. I figured I would have to fix it later. Couple of days later I checked it and it was just fine. Aired it up a little, but other than that...good to go. Anyone on the fence about the tubeless thing...do it, without hesitation.

  13. #63
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    I've gone from tube advocate to tubeless over time.

    For texas the key is making sure that you are putting fresh stans in the tires every few months, it dries up quickly here.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  14. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by austin_bike View Post
    I've gone from tube advocate to tubeless over time.

    For texas the key is making sure that you are putting fresh stans in the tires every few months, it dries up quickly here.

    I didn't know that. Thanks for the tip. I planned on getting with the folks at BSS to for some upkeep tips since they are the ones that converted both bikes. By the way, I really like your site...I send people to it all of the time if they are new to the Austin area. Thanks for all the work on it. Feel free to post my map for Reimers Ranch on it if you would like.

  15. #65
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    Did your fsr come with tubeless compatible tires and wheels?

    I want to run tubeless but am hesitant to set them up ghetto since I don't have an air compressor.

    How much did BSS charge if you don't mind me asking?

  16. #66
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    Since both of the bikes I had it done on I was having built up in one way or the other, I wasn't sure on the cost. I called the folks at BSS and it sounds like it would be roughly $100. On my Stumpy FSR 29er, I had already had them build me up a better back wheel because of some problems, which Specialized pitched in, so I had them build up the same Stans Flow Rim for me on the front at the same time they converted it to tubeless. I think the original wheels and tires are fine for it, but you may check into it a little more. Tell em Dave with the Turquoise Yeti sent you!

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by smokehouse4444 View Post
    I didn't know that. Thanks for the tip. I planned on getting with the folks at BSS to for some upkeep tips since they are the ones that converted both bikes. By the way, I really like your site...I send people to it all of the time if they are new to the Austin area. Thanks for all the work on it. Feel free to post my map for Reimers Ranch on it if you would like.
    Thanks. If you are near central Austin, if you come by my place I can show you how to add more Stan's. takes a few minutes.

    You need a cor removal tool ($2-3) and a syringe (<$10) to make it all work.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    Did your fsr come with tubeless compatible tires and wheels?

    I want to run tubeless but am hesitant to set them up ghetto since I don't have an air compressor.

    How much did BSS charge if you don't mind me asking?
    Depending on the tire you should have no issue. I use a floor pump for mine. Planning on getting a compressor in the future but for now a pump works fine. You may need to throw a tube in, pump it up and make it seal, then pull the tube and put In Stan's.

    Even when I do that I can get 2 wheels done in well less than an hour.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  19. #69
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    I have wtb speed disc i19 wheels and geax aka tires. Neither of which are ust/tubeless ready I believe. I just really want to try it out.

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    I have wtb speed disc i19 wheels and geax aka tires. Neither of which are ust/tubeless ready I believe. I just really want to try it out.
    I'm running 26" Geax AKA TNT tubeless on Stans Arch EX rims with Orange Seal sealant. I had some issues mounting, but after pulling the yellow Stans tape and retaping with Orange Seal's tape, I was all set.

    Great tires....but scary on wet rock!

  21. #71
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    I have also heard people use gorilla tape to seal up rims. I use Kenda tires that are not tubeless and they work fine. However, Kenda now has tubeless models out as well. I have Stan's flow rims. For me ust was always a pain in the butt so I never used it.
    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  22. #72
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    Re: Tubeless in texas

    What do the tubeless ready/compatible wheels have that standard ones don't? Is it lip construction or something?

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevor_b View Post
    What do the tubeless ready/compatible wheels have that standard ones don't? Is it lip construction or something?
    There isn't a real clearcut answer to this. Same with tires. Most "non-tubeless" work fine, some don't. The best answer is that anything that says tubeless has actually been engineered and tested to do so and will hold the bead tight. However, all rims from the dawn of time are designed to hold a tire's bead securely. Otherwise they would slip off with or without a tube. That's why so many are able to go ghetto tubeless without a problem.

    Actual UST rims have a patented hooked bead seat (lip) and the spoke holes are not drilled through the inner wall of the rim. Thus, it is airtight without the use of tape. There are others (Crankbros., some Eastons) that also use systems that don't require tape. Other tubeless ready wheels have to use tape to seal the spoke holes but have one form or another of bead seat technology that hooks the tire specifically for use tubeless.

  24. #74
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    Austin Mountain Biking and worldwide travel pictures:

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  25. #75
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    my experience: use tubeless tires (not necessarily UST) and the correct adapter rim strip or tubeless rim for the job. using non-tubeless tires is a gamble. they might seal up and work flawlessly and they are lighter, but they can get cut more easily and might not seal up at the bead.

    also, you can't put "yellow tape" on just any rim and expect it to seal up. you need your rim to have a tight fit at the bead like a Stan's BST rim provides or the bead will burp air. you can do this by using a tubeless-specific rim or a rim with the appropriate tubeless rim strip like Bontrager's plastic rim strips for their rims.

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