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  1. #1
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    NE Texas and tires and thorns. What do you do?

    I ride up in the DFW area. I bought a pair of $20 Bontrager mud tires a month ago and have ridden a lot around Rowlett Creek and Big Cedar with no problems.

    Yesterday I bought a new Cannondale Trail 6 with the small block 8 tires and not 10 minutes into the ride I have a flat. The thorn looked like a bee stinger. When the tire went flat, I felt it and compared to my other tires, was very thin and flimsy. I couldn't believe how soft this tire felt.

    Until I go tubeless, I am going to put the Bontrager tires from my other bike on this Cannondale. That said, short of going tubeless, what do you all do to protect from thorns? I carry an extra tube, but will get a patch kit as well.

    Do ya'll use any type of tire liner on the inside or what?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    tubeless, go ahead and do it now, you are just wasting money and adding weight otherwise...if not, you can get some tire liners or some slime tubes

    stay on the trails as well, once you get into the grass, thats where you run into a ton of goatheads (not to say you wont still pick up a thorn on the trail, but the likelihood is much less)

    those mud tires look very slow for our trails

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the input. Guess I will see about tubeless, especially too if it cuts down on weight. I'm not counting every ounce, but my bike is heavier that I would like.

  4. #4
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    Tubeless is the way to go but a bit more involved than the tubes with sealant inside them, either way you will be much happier and spend more time riding.

  5. #5
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    Going tubeless is much easier and (can be) cheaper than it sounds like you are thinking it will be. Most tires and rims (UST or not) will work just fine. Just install Stan's rim strips or use the Gorilla tape ghetto method (look it up on youtube).

  6. #6
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    +1 on tubeless. Flats are thing of the past now. You just need to add Stan's here in Texas about monthly cuz it dries out. There is something new called Orangeseal that I may try because it reportedly does not dry out as quickly. Other than that, Stan's is great.
    If you're really honest about it, they're all "cheater lines".

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by notyal View Post
    Going tubeless is much easier and (can be) cheaper than it sounds like you are thinking it will be. Most tires and rims (UST or not) will work just fine. Just install Stan's rim strips or use the Gorilla tape ghetto method (look it up on youtube).

    Thanks. I am thinking that if I buy new the wheelset will be $900 and I will pay $45 a tire.

    I have a buddy who builds bikes that may hook me up with some nice parts, but otherwise, no, I did not know there was an inexpensive tubeless option.

    I just checked on youtube, wow. nice that there are tubeless kits.
    Last edited by CajunJamie; 06-05-2012 at 02:38 PM.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by CajunJamie View Post
    Thanks. I am thinking that if I buy new the wheelset will be $900 and I will pay $45 a tire.

    I have a buddy who builds bikes that may hook me up with some nice parts, but otherwise, no, I did not know there was an inexpensive tubeless option.
    A new $900 wheelset would be a sweet upgrade, but do it for weight savings and hub engagement. It is not necessary just to go tubeless. Just get a roll of 1" Gorilla tape, a bottle of Stans, and a couple of valves. Thats all you should need and you can get it all for $40. Any shop that tells you that you need to buy new wheels or tires is just trying to sell you something. There are a few brands of tires that the bead is too loose (Hutchinson and Intense come to mind), but most work fine.

  9. #9
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    Just came across this on WTB:

    WTB TCS : Tubeless Compatible System

  10. #10
    meh
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    nothing special there

  11. #11
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    After reading the whole page I thought it would be more. It looked like they had more of a universal approach; instead it looks like they are just tapping into the market.

  12. #12
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    Add my name to the list of tubless proponents.

    I've been running tubless for over a year now. I just replaced my winter tires about a month ago and both the front and rear had several 1" long mesquite thorns in them. I have no idea how long they've been there. Didn't matter because the tubless setup worked like a champ.

    It may seem like a bit more trouble up front. But, when you're out there changing an inner tube for the second time during a ride (and being eaten alive by mosquitoes) you'll realize the investment may not be so bad after all...
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  13. #13
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    I am 100% on-board for going tubeless. I just cannot decide if I will wait and purchase a tubeless wheelset, or convert to tubeless. If I convert to tubeless, I have not decided if I will buy a kit (which one?) or just get sealant and go Gorilla tape and electrical tape.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CajunJamie View Post
    I am 100% on-board for going tubeless. I just cannot decide if I will wait and purchase a tubeless wheelset, or convert to tubeless. If I convert to tubeless, I have not decided if I will buy a kit (which one?) or just get sealant and go Gorilla tape and electrical tape.
    My first tubless setup was using UST tires, gorilla tape, a stem from an innertube, and slime. It worked great.

    I eventually switched to the stan's tape just because the gorilla tape was leaving a nasty residue when I would occasionally remove it. I later read a post where someone used a heat gun (maybe a hair dryer?) to warm the gorilla tape so it wouldn't leave behind the residue when removed. Had I known that I might have kept using the gorilla tape.

    UST tires will be the easiest but also the heaviest (thickest sidewalls). If you decide to use a non-UST tire, you'll need to use stan's sealant (or a homebrew with latex) instead of the slime.

    Here's some pics that might help you visualize the conversion.

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    If you're up in the Frisco area I'd be glad to lend a hand if you need some help.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by marpilli View Post
    My first tubless setup was using UST tires, gorilla tape, a stem from an innertube, and slime. It worked great.

    I eventually switched to the stan's tape just because the gorilla tape was leaving a nasty residue when I would occasionally remove it. I later read a post where someone used a heat gun (maybe a hair dryer?) to warm the gorilla tape so it wouldn't leave behind the residue when removed. Had I known that I might have kept using the gorilla tape.

    UST tires will be the easiest but also the heaviest (thickest sidewalls). If you decide to use a non-UST tire, you'll need to use stan's sealant (or a homebrew with latex) instead of the slime.

    Here's some pics that might help you visualize the conversion.

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    GT Frame Build-Up - 2005 Aggressor

    If you're up in the Frisco area I'd be glad to lend a hand if you need some help.
    Wow! That is about as straight-forward as it gets, with your step-by-step pictures. Thanks for sharing.

    I live in Wylie and work in McKinney. I appreciate the offer to assist. I may try and tackle this job this weekend, due to the rain. I was planning to ride North Shore Sunday, but now that won't happen.

    One question - I'd be doing this on the stock Alex DC4.5 rims of a brand new Cannondale. I swapped to Bontrager tires that were thicker than the small block 8's it came with.

    Once I do this and add slime, can that stuff ever be cleaned out and the rim go back to tube easily? Just hypothetically, so I have an idea what happens once slime is used.

    thanks again!
    jamie

    PS: What did you do with the rim strips you took off to clean? Did you use them again on the rims?

  16. #16
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    yes, it can be cleaned out, it dries over time and forms "scabs" that youll want to remove when adding more

  17. #17
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    Orange seal and gorilla tape. Never look back.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I777 using Tapatalk 2
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  18. #18
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    Yep, as clewttu said it can be cleaned out without much trouble. The wheelset in the photos was converted back and given away a few months ago. I've since converted two other wheelsets (using stan's tape and presta valves) without problems.

    If those Bontrager tires aren't UST then the Slime isn't going to help you. You'll need to get something like Stan's sealant or put together a homebrew that has latex in it. The Slime won't seal up the sidewalls like Stan's does.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  19. #19
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    Ok, thanks so much for all of the follow ups. I had not even heard of UST until today, I just checked the Internet and those seem to be tubeless tires. I'll likely get a set.

    Very good advice. Especially in this rainy weather. Great for projects.

  20. #20
    meh
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    tubeless just means there is no tube, and can be used to describe various systems

    UST is a standard that describes particular rims and tires, it involves a special bead on the tire and and matching rim interface, as well as an extra layer of rubber inside the tire...most robust of the various methods
    tubeless ready tires have the same UST bead but forgo the extra rubber layer inside the tire, thus requiring sealant
    then you have standard tires, with a normal bead and no extra layer of rubber

    you dont need UST to go tubeless, and sometimes some standard rims do not play well with UST beads, just a forewarning, Id suggest doing a bit more research before just diving in

  21. #21
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    ^^^ Good advice.
    Contact information: http://about.me/marpilli

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by clewttu View Post
    tubeless just means there is no tube, and can be used to describe various systems

    UST is a standard that describes particular rims and tires, it involves a special bead on the tire and and matching rim interface, as well as an extra layer of rubber inside the tire...most robust of the various methods
    tubeless ready tires have the same UST bead but forgo the extra rubber layer inside the tire, thus requiring sealant
    then you have standard tires, with a normal bead and no extra layer of rubber

    you dont need UST to go tubeless, and sometimes some standard rims do not play well with UST beads, just a forewarning, Id suggest doing a bit more research before just diving in
    Good points, thanks!

  23. #23
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    Just a follow-up. I'm going to give my Bontragers a shot before I convert to tubeless. Wanted to post a pic of what I went to. The Kendas on the left came off and the Bontragers on the right went on. So far I love them.


  24. #24
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    just saw your post on the temp dorba forum, i am not signing up for that site so i couldnt post a response there...seems you are going to try and convert

    "from most all of the instructional videos I have seen and recommendations, the Shrader valve is much preferred over the Presta valve because it is larger and can more easily accept sealant.

    For those with Presta valves, it is recommended they drill out the hole to make it larger for a Shrader. For those who already have Shrader holes, they simply recommend getting a threaded valve off a Continental tube or buy a stand-alone Shrader valve."

    this is incorrect, drilling rims is almost never recommended...not to mention almost everything out there for tubeless is presta, and there is nothing easier about a schrader valve compared to presta if you have removable valve cores

  25. #25
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    After seeing how hard it is to find Shrader valves locally, I am now more than willing to try a Presta adapter and valves if I have valve leaks with my setup.

    I do agree most stuff out there today is Presta, but for some reason the conversion videos, to me, leaned toward Shrader. I may have understood incorrectly, but anyway...

    Thanks.

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