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  1. #1
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    clipless pedals for a beginner

    What kind of clipless pedals would you guys recommend for a beginner? I have been looking into the Shimano S-324 multi-use pedal... Any suggestions??

  2. #2
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    I'd recommend the M530 (Shimano)
    Shimano PD M530 SLX Trail Clipless Pedal > Components > Pedals, Cleats, Toe Clips, Straps > Pedals | Jenson USA Online Bike Shop

    When I was getting my first pair of clipless, I thought I wanted something like the one you mentioned (one side flat, one side w/ clips). But, a more experienced rider convinced me to just dive in and get the double sided... Definitely the right call. You'll get used to the mechanism within two or three rides, and then, you won't want to have to fiddle with choosing a side and rotating the pedal while on the trail.

    The M530 is the "base" model of the trail pedals from Shimano. They have more expensive "XT" and "XTR" ones that are probably lighter, etc.

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the info, I will definitely look into to these.

  4. #4
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    Speedplay frogs are another great option. They don't use a spring, so there is no resistance. Instead, there are metal tabs that line up to keep you locked in.

    I've been using Frogs since the late 90's. Absolutely love them.

  5. #5
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    If I get double sided pedals can I still wear sneakers with these pedals to just ride around town.

  6. #6
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    They make platform inserts that you can slip into SPD pedals to make it a lot easier to ride when using standard shoes without cleats. A shop will likely even give you a set. (super cheap, basic plastic)

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the help I'm looking at ordering my pedals next week going on my specialized hardrock 29er.

  8. #8
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    I am a beginner to clipless this year... here is what I did.

    I have tried many brands of SPD (true Shimano style) and never liked them. What I have been told now is that I really needed to use the multirelease cleats as they are much more beginner friendly. If you go with Shimano pedals, get the multi-release cleats and set your retention pretty low. As you geet us to the pedals, you can tighten up the retention mechanism.

    Second, I tried some Time Atacs (although the were some fairly old ATACs). I REALLY like the way these feel.... on the road. Easy in and very stable. They were a tad harder to get out of, which was fine on the road, but I would have eaten dirt a few times on the trail (I am no small potato, so falling could cause some serious damage). If I get a road bike, I will use ATACs on a road bike unless I want to buy road shoes. If I bought road shoes, I would go with.....

    Speedplay pedals. These are under-sung heroes as far as I am concerned. I had a friend YEARS ago that told me they were the most friendly pedal for beginners and/or folks with some knee issues (both described me back then). I came across a second hand pair of the stainless steel Speedplay Frogs this year and grabbed them. Bought a new set of cleats. I will never look back. I LOVE THESE PEDALS! I would recommend anybody to try these out. They are a bit weird at first because there is no spring pressure keeping you in the pedal, so it feels sort of like being on ice since the metal on metal is free to move around. Once you build a little trust, they are BEAUTIFUL to ride with. I have had no falls (knocks on desk) since I started riding with them full time 3 months ago. The motion to "get out" is the same as with other shoes, but without the spring pressure holding you in, it is VERY easy to get out in a panic (I have been doing well with getting out fast enough to put a foot down in poorly executed fast switchbacks as I go around the corner and get back into them seamlessly).

    The only thing I would say with the Frogs is that it is VERY important that you follow the directions of installing the cleats. There is a part of the instructions where you leave the cleats loos, engage the pedals with the shoes (not on you) and rotate the heal of the shoe so it almost touches the crank arm, take the shoe off the pedal (doesn't move the cleat) and tighten them down.... once done, the shoe is set up perfectly! I had an accidental release when I first got them because I didn't go through the proper procedure..... accidental release while out of the saddle hammering is as scary as anything out there!

    Accept that there is a learning curve. Spend time practicing in and out in your house (in a doorway propped up).... take your time.... now that I ride with them, I only plan on using platforms in really unfamiliar trails or on a new bike (get use to the bike first).... I don't plan on using platforms very much at all because the Frogs are just that good!
    Fat guys need bikes too.

  9. #9
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    Shimano spds what I got as a first timer. Swapped them on my all mountain to. Love them. Although I am thinking about going to flats....

    Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk 2

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rivers View Post
    If I get double sided pedals can I still wear sneakers with these pedals to just ride around town.
    Yes, if you get the kind with the "cage" around them (for example, the ones I linked to above).

  11. #11
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    You might try the Shimano SH-56 multi-directional release cleats. I tried them on recommendation of a fellow rider and still use them. I thought that there would be a lot of unwanted releases and that I would change over time but with my basic riding style that has not been the case for me.

  12. #12
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    I almost always ride flats, but I'll occasionally throw some Crankbrothers Mallets on my trail bike, sometimes even my DH bike if the mood suits me.

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