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  1. #251
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    May 2007
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    34
    We just raced our tandem at the Prairie City Race in Folsom, CA with the Marzocchi 66 last night and loved it. It was so plush and stiff compared to the old Strattos. Sag was set to 25% (35mm) and the ziptie showed that we used about 115mm of the 140mm of travel. I thought the handling was fine. I was able to climb at a slow pace without any flop. I think I will be keeping the travel at 140mm but will lessen the compression dampening to utilize more of the travel. I had to use about 30psi of air preload. I think I am exceeding the recommended here but it is working well for us.

    Now that the fork is working pretty good I am noticing how bouncy the rear RP23 shock is. Time to fiddle with the dampening on it. I never really messed much with it other than getting the air pressure right.

    Here we are at the race climbing a hill.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Suspension Fork Experience - What's Working? What's Not?-20160601480.jpg  


  2. #252
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    Sep 2010
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    Great success!

  3. #253
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    Oct 2011
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    274
    I won a fork from Mountain Flyer magazine, It was supposed to be a 29'er boost fork. I asked for a 1.125 steerer so what I could get didn't really fit 29er wheels. I could fit a skinny 29er in there but with no mud room. The fork is a "German-A boost" fork. It has 36mm stations 100mm of travel and a sturdy 1.125" steerer. (also comes in tapered steerer." I ended up mounting it on our 10+ year old Curtlo 26" tandem. Our Dirt Jumper 1 was in need of a rebuild so I thought it might be a good option. I was able to fit a 26x2.75 dirt wizard in there, and could have fit a 27.5 but probably not + sized. We have only gotten to ride it on trails once, and that was cut short by mud but it felt great. Much more neutral handling than the dirt jumper. I think this was mostly due to the stiffer stations. This is a new fork on the market and I don't imagine they would want to call it tandem approved, but I will keep it on our bike for the time being and update this when I have more to report. We don't ride the tandem as much these days, My wife loves her Santa Cruz too much and I am now recovering from a broken rib.

  4. #254
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    Oct 2011
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    [I] said I would update when I had more to report. there is not much to say. I did get a second ride on it, this time with a friend who hasn't ridden on dirt in 11 years. She is a seasoned road rider (touring rider) and she used to ride a road tandem with her ex. She is taller and heavier than my wife, but she was a willing and capable stoker. We ended up riding some fun intermediate trails. There are several switchbacks on the route and we were able to clean all but 2 of them and that was due to communication problems, and not the lack of trying. The fork was very solid. I never felt like it was flexing too much, creating any vagueness in the steering. I am comparing it to an old dirtjumper 1 that never felt stiff enough for me. Both have 20mm. through axles. I don't know how available this fork will be, or if it will be "tandem approved" but so far I like it better than my tandem approved D.J.1.

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