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Thread: Fandango Thread

  1. #151
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by strow View Post
    PK,

    Thanks for your thoughts and observations on the new frame. We've got a new one coming and are looking forward to it very much. We've already planned to take some vacation time for the shakedown rides.

    For now the road tandem will have to do.

    strow
    Are you getting a complete bike or just a frame?

    Any planned ideas for how it will be built?

    From the posted photos, you will notice many variants of building a Fandango 29r. Many owners have posted details of their builds, bikes, sometimes trails and even rider and ride impressions. Alex hasn't listed details of the bikes he has posted photos of, but it seems a good number are being built with Rohloffs.

    Not sure of where you live or plan to ride, or even your teams skill set and planned use, but I would seriously consider gearing choice. Team Judd are very good climbers and supplement feature with gearing to let them climb when others walk. Trust me, our shoes are worn. Also, make an educated choice for your area in regards to tire selection. Fandangos are nimble enough to feel definite results from various tire selections. You should be able to find a good all-around well performing tire.

    We would love a newer version frame, but currently our bike is still more than fine for us and money is a factor.

    Keep us updated to the progress.

    PK
    Last edited by PMK; 05-26-2011 at 05:50 PM.

  2. #152
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    PK,

    In answer to your questions:

    1- We're having a complete bike built by Alex.

    2- It will be a DC-9 build with White single crown, tapered fork. The stoker requested a Grinch Green frame so that's we're getting. ( Tandem Rule #1 )

    This will be our first tandem mtn. bike. We have learned much from this thread and folks like you that have taken the time to post their experiences and knowledge. A Saturday spent riding demo bikes with Alex and getting questions answered didn't hurt the cause either.

    We're located in the southeastern corner of Alabama and have a choice of riding options from fire roads to single track. The plan is to start slowly, develop our skills, and see where it leads us. ( We're a 109 yr. old team ) My parents live in the Tampa Bay area and the road tandem always goes on our frequent visits. The mtn. tandem will open up some new places to enjoy like Croom and Santos. ( used to ride motorcycles at Croom in my youth )

    As a new dirt team we have much to learn. But isn't that at least half the fun?

    We'll keep you posted...............

    strow

  3. #153
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    Sounds like it will be a nice build. Test rides are a really cool way to spend money.

    If you have read this entire topic, it probably states early on that as a team we had no intention of riding a 29r. The test ride at AORTA 2010 pretty much convinced us about the bikes performance, fit and quality. Our current Fandango is our typical bike of choice for much of the mileage we ride off-road. rides.

    Yes, you have Croom, but it is probably exactly like when you twisted a throttle...often sandy.

    For us and possibly the other Florida teams that have ridden Santos may agree that Santos is almost purpose built for a tandem.

    While in Tampa, don't forget Boyette and Alafia. We have ridden both places. As you may be aware, SWAMP, the local club does a great job with those trails. There are definite trails that are built marked and maintained for each skill level. Respect that with regards to your adventuremeter and ability.

    Just about an hour drive north of Santos is San Felasco. This is another great trail that is very tandem friendly. There are a few places that may test your switchback skills, however I would say it is 100% rideable.

    Sounds like you have a plan and purpose to travel / ride. Now the flip side, with you having a road tandem, possibly you attend road events also. Might keep this group in mind. Other Florida off-road teams, including us, also hit the pavement,

    http://www.floridatandemclub.org/

    The Panthers group is based about 20 minutes south of Santos and rides several times per week.

    If you transport by car, you may need a second rail for your roof rack when visiting.

    Give some advance warning when you plan to ride in Florida, possibly we can get a small group of several or more bikes riding Santos.

    PK

  4. #154
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    I have actually considered doing an MTB Tandems Bike porn/pic thread or something silimar, which would also include more build specs on the individual bikes, and new products if/when they come available. However, I don't want to take advatage of or abuse this forum by doing so. What say you the other subscribers here???
    MTB Tandems Inc.
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  5. #155
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    Quote Originally Posted by TandemNut View Post
    I have actually considered doing an MTB Tandems Bike porn/pic thread or something silimar, which would also include more build specs on the individual bikes, and new products if/when they come available. However, I don't want to take advatage of or abuse this forum by doing so. What say you the other subscribers here???
    post em up! Maybe we need one of them "show us your tandem" threads anyway

  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by TandemNut View Post
    I have actually considered doing an MTB Tandems Bike porn/pic thread or something silimar, which would also include more build specs on the individual bikes, and new products if/when they come available. However, I don't want to take advatage of or abuse this forum by doing so. What say you the other subscribers here???
    You can start a new topic or take the bike shots you already posted and add the details. This would keep all the Fandango stuff grouped together in one topic. I don't really see it as abuse of the forum, more sharing ideas.

    These Fandangos have been built in many different variations. Often they get ridden and modified further. I know ours has seen some changes from the original build. Team Judd has been on a ride it wear it out upgrade program and has now got a very high end machine.

    Like DS says, POST EM UP.

    The ECDM topic should be the same, show em off, it's all good.

    PK

  7. #157
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    This weekend marks the anniversary of us getting our Fandango frame.

    It took a few weeks to build it up, so the true ride anniversary is a couple weeks away.

    Last night, 07.02 was the first time this bike has not finished a ride...

    The bike has been ridden a lot over the past year. It started out with a 2x9 all right side drive, and now is running a 2x9 right and left side setup.

    The fork has been pampered a bit, and now is in my opinion a great hardtail reliable fork. It's massive and easily handles the tandems added loads.

    Not much except the drivetrain has been changed (cranks and BB's) except for wear items.

    After some tire testing, we settled on running Panaracer Rampages. We also run Slime tubes.

    This is where the first push it home came in. We headed out for a sunset / finish in the dark ride. Pretty typical, leave from home, get in about 30 miles, finish at home. We got a flat. Luckily we had cut the ride short and were headed home. The bike felt odd, and sure enough the rear tire was low. We managed to clear the woods and I gave it a fast pump up at the sidewalk towards home.

    Well, yes I could have changed the tube, but I explained to the stoker, 2 new tires are sitting at home and these two are bald, lets just get home. 1 mile from home we were on a total flat, doing our best to save the wheel and be like Lance at Leadville.

    1/2 mile out we walked.

    So for one year of total abuse, many long distance rides, rain, mud, swamps, drought sandy sections the bike has been through quite a bit.

    One DNF, which could have been a simple mosquito laden tube change is all to report back on.

    I already have the tires, planning to get some new tubes & rim strips. Rear derailleur pulleys could cut lumber so they will get replaced. Probably rebuild the Avid BB7 calipers and replace the cables. And of course some new grips. If the stoker is nice I will rebuild the pivots on her Thudbuster too.

    I have no recorded mileage for every ride on this bike, I'm speculating it's a decent amount past 2000 miles off road for the year, possibly over 3000. The bike still is our first choice for most rides...even if my shoes are worn from walking a short distance.

    Sorry for the bad report Alex, I would have thought it could go at least a year without a DNF...

    PK

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMK View Post
    If the stoker is nice I will rebuild the pivots on her Thudbuster too.

    PK
    Your stoker is WAAAAAAAY beyond NICE!

  9. #159
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sam Jones View Post
    Your stoker is WAAAAAAAY beyond NICE!
    She enjoyed our chats with you Gail and Bandit during AORTA.

    I think my stoker smiles but cringes when moto guys get together.

    BTW, I have not forgotten about the KTMTalk topic. Just been busy.

    So your vote says rebuild the Thudbuster.

    I do need to add that all the stokers that we have been around are good people.

    PK

  10. #160
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    I did not accomplish all I wanted to while the bike was apart. It got a decent cleaning, the new pulleys, tires and tubes.

    Grips are here and will go on soon.

    We've put a bunch of miles on it since back together...

    The bike is still our most ridden machine.

    I'm sure that there are a bunch more sold and ridden since this topic started...post some photos or share some stories people.

    PK
    Reps! We don't need no stickin' reps!

  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by PMK View Post
    I'm sure that there are a bunch more sold and ridden since this topic started...post some photos or share some stories people.
    PK
    PK, would love to contribute here. We got a good number of rides on our DC-9, then decided the normal drive isn't up to the task of hard riding. (Not without requisite wrenching and replacing parts, anyway.) So we replaced it with the Rohloff-equipped Tourista. We got one ride on it last year before my babe took some overseas work, so I've had this essentially-new awesome rig sitting for a year. Ouch, man. You can bet we'll be thrashing the living sh|t out of it this fall. Yea, the check's in the mail. I'm still living through you guys, so keep rocking the Fandangos (and all brands) and we'll get up to speed in coming weeks.

    Cheers,

    Mike

  12. #162
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    Quote Originally Posted by She&I View Post
    PK, would love to contribute here. We got a good number of rides on our DC-9, then decided the normal drive isn't up to the task of hard riding. (Not without requisite wrenching and replacing parts, anyway.) So we replaced it with the Rohloff-equipped Tourista. We got one ride on it last year before my babe took some overseas work, so I've had this essentially-new awesome rig sitting for a year. Ouch, man. You can bet we'll be thrashing the living sh|t out of it this fall. Yea, the check's in the mail. I'm still living through you guys, so keep rocking the Fandangos (and all brands) and we'll get up to speed in coming weeks.

    Cheers,

    Mike

    Get that thing cleaned and lubed...take a photo and paste it here, even if you did before. Good to hear you'll be tandeming again.

    We had an oh crap, wish we had a helmet cam on during the ride last Sunday. I typically do not mind riding rain ruts on descents. Most times not a big deal, just sketchy. Descending a narrow under 12" wide ribbon of trail on our hill trail, found me get the bike in a rut at probably 18 mph. Up ahead I see a dark spot in the trail, we have had a lot of rain recently so I knew this could be bad. Hard on the brakes, and trying to climb out of the rut, but it won't stop or jump out. I send orders to the stern "HANG ON, SIT BACK! I just released the brakes to keep some momentum. We hit a huge square edged hole. My wrists were killin' me after the impact.

    Rode the same trail last night. Knowing it was coming this time I stayed to the side of that rut. I checked out the hole going by it. Could not easily see a bottom and the distance across was easily over a foot, probably more like 16".

    Note to self, "enjoy ruts because you like to ride them and other challenges, but don't get overconfident"

    Fandango is a great bike on that trail. We rode it with CLJ when they visited last winter. I think he enjoyed it, short climbs and descents, mostly slower when headed up. It was windy the day we rode it with CLJ. We looked back at one point and wondered why they stopped...they were blown of the trail from the high winds.

    PK
    Reps! We don't need no stickin' reps!

  13. #163
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    We've had our DC-9 for a month now and have really enjoyed getting up to speed with it. It's been on fire roads, mups, state forest trails, and some very tight, narrow, root filled single track that was beyond our current skill set. ( blood & bruises to prove it ) The tandem has not let us down or disappointed. There's always the minor adjustments and changes you make to tweak the fit and comfort, but we have no complaints with the bike.

    Coming from a road background, we're discovering the differences with every outing, learning what to take with you on the trail, the different communication needs, and handling skills.
    The Fandango has been a great platform to help us through our growing pains. The stoker always comments on how well it climbs and how comfortable it rides. ( refer to tandem rule #1 )

    Thanks to Alex for all his help and this forum for providing information to help a new team get started.

    strow

  14. #164
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    Great Thread Guys - I'm new on here (from the Frozen North) - Just ordered my Fandango from Alex, and looking forward to my first ever ride on a Tandem - me and my 9 year old lad! (we'll be on a 17/15).
    Cheers,
    Dave.

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    short stems and Fandangos....

    I have a small size Fandango on the way to me in a few weeks from Alex ( many thanks to this forum especially!). Me at 5'7 , and the ETT at 24.2", seems it will likely be long for me. I'm have a few 29er singles and the ETT's all hover ,quite comfortably,at the 22.5-22.7inch range with 100-110mm stems. Has anyone tried real short stems...like 60mm-70mm on a small size frame Fandango? Curious how it affects steering and especially front end traction....FYI, I'm running the single crown White Bros.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenndandy View Post
    I have a small size Fandango on the way to me in a few weeks from Alex ( many thanks to this forum especially!). Me at 5'7 , and the ETT at 24.2", seems it will likely be long for me. I'm have a few 29er singles and the ETT's all hover ,quite comfortably,at the 22.5-22.7inch range with 100-110mm stems. Has anyone tried real short stems...like 60mm-70mm on a small size frame Fandango? Curious how it affects steering and especially front end traction....FYI, I'm running the single crown White Bros.
    I've had great luck with a 85mm stem. Have not tried anything smaller (but was also concerned about the longer ETT but it's all good!). I'm 5'8".

    If you have the luxury of trying different stems, you may want to try a few different options?

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenndandy View Post
    I have a small size Fandango on the way to me in a few weeks from Alex ( many thanks to this forum especially!). Me at 5'7 , and the ETT at 24.2", seems it will likely be long for me.
    FWIW, I don't think stem length really effects handling on a tandem quite like it does on single bikes. Quite logical actually when you think about it - weight distribution is dictated by captain + stoker & the overall reach (stem length) only plays a minor role in the captain's C.G. & none in the stoker's.

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Paul Proteus View Post
    FWIW, I don't think stem length really effects handling on a tandem quite like it does on single bikes. Quite logical actually when you think about it - weight distribution is dictated by captain + stoker & the overall reach (stem length) only plays a minor role in the captain's C.G. & none in the stoker's.
    Granted there is more natural weight loading on the front wheel of a tandem. The number to "crunch" would be weight bias, or percentage of weight carried by each wheel when fully laden.

    The captain stem can alter weight bias slightly, however it is more important in regards to comfort. Almost as important is the effort to turn the bars when adding input to turn, the most important though is probably the effort of upright the bike after a corner. Some trails require little effort, while others can work you "chicken wing" muscles more than a dirt bike. The turning effort is not only a stem function, but also factors in head angle, trail dimension, bar width and height, plus the terrain.

    Find what works and don't be afraid to test beyond what others recommend or what is deemed "normal". There is no magic formula, just good basepoints that work for many teams.

    PK
    Reps! We don't need no stickin' reps!

  19. #169
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    After many weeks of real hot days, we finally got a break. With the heat, the Fandango has not seen the use typical of other times of the year. Crazy as it sounds, we spent many weekends on the Co-Motion, granted it has been hot, but at least we had air moving over us.

    Tonight the Fandango got a good run, a fast ride, mostly off-road for 2 1/2 hours. Rode non stop, with a 5 minute stop on the ride home to get Gatorade and candy bars.

    The heat of previous rides really slowed us down. The rides in the rain made it like riding on a mattress. Cooler temps, no rain, good dirt...just as we remembered...this is a fast bike with the reliability of a bowling ball.

    PK
    Reps! We don't need no stickin' reps!

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  21. #171
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    Light bikepacking setup with off-the-shelf systems on our Tourista.




    All stock except: Ergon GX1 grips, stoker rise bar, stoker post (for bikepacking only), and some drive mods to get the ratio down to an unrecomm, er, ridiculously low bottom end.

    And dig this...it has a Fandango logo on it

    A very comfortable and capable bike...big nod to Alex N. and MTBTandems!

    Mike

  22. #172
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    Smile 29er tandems

    From reading your posts it looks like 26" tandems will switch over to the 29 er advantage like single mountain bikes. I do appreciate the advantages you all post. What is the widest tire a 29 er will accept with aggressive knobbies?
    I saw 4 pics of tandems from the 2011 Tour de Felasco in Florida. Maybe more tandems will make the pics this year. Let's hope so!

    Happy trails

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by tndmnuts View Post
    From reading your posts it looks like 26" tandems will switch over to the 29 er advantage like single mountain bikes. I do appreciate the advantages you all post. What is the widest tire a 29 er will accept with aggressive knobbies?
    I saw 4 pics of tandems from the 2011 Tour de Felasco in Florida. Maybe more tandems will make the pics this year. Let's hope so!

    Happy trails
    2.35 Panaracer Rampage is my standard rear tire on the Fandango. 2.4 Maxxis Ardent up front, but that has nothing to o with frame clearance. I am not sure if I'd call those tires "aggressive", but they're not light XC tires either...

  25. #175
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    I'd guess a 2.4 would have breathing room. We're still on our stock Exiwolf 2.3s. We'll probably put a 2.4 on the rear next (good to hear, ds). On the Rohloff, inflating the tire fully after the wheel's been installed on the bike is necessary unless you want to take the chain tensioner off or remove its rear stop.

    tndmnuts, I'd say there are even more advantages to the 29er platform for a tandem than a single. Nobody gets a tandem expecting to feel nimble and flickable on the trail, so why not 29"? Bigger wheels roll through better at lower speeds and inevitable rough areas you get into while turning a longer bike. Under-bike clearance on a tandem is already abysmal, why have it worse than it needs to be? Maybe for certain riders a 26" would be better, but we haven't found any situation where I'd rather have 26" wheels on our Fandango.

    Cheers and happy new year,

    Mike

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