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Thread: DT hub tip

  1. #1
    PMK
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    DT hub tip

    For most DT users, this will not be an issue.

    If you buy DT tandem hubs like the 540, or the older TD's they come with a steel freehub body. The reason steel is good focuses on the ability of the material to resist getting notched from the cassette sprockets.

    Our ECDM arrived with a DT model 440 rear hub. This hub previously was called the Hugi FR. This is not a tandem type hub, and did not come with a steel freehub body.

    The notched freehub will make removing the cassette a challenge. If you use two chain whip tools, hold the largest smaller individual sprocket in the pull direction and then use the second tool to "unlock" the remaining sprockets from their notches.

    You will still need to use a device of force, like a plastic or even ball peen hammer to finish the task. Do not try this with the freehub installed on the axle. Install an old cassette lockring, and apply the impact to that. Hopefully the items will come apart without to much persuasion.

    The other big concern is minimizing this problem from happening again.

    I purchased a stainless steel freehub body individually to upgrade our hub. Upon receipt, I noticed the seal area under the lockring was different. from the original aluminum freehub.

    I installed the new freehub and found the freehub had bound up when the wheel was installed. During some research about the steel freehub bodies, one internet poster stated he had similar problems, gave up and returned his stainless freehub body. What I found is that there must be some change or revision to the dust seal portion of the design.

    I do not know if we have a later or early style dust seal setup, but found that removing the dust seal that came with our new freehub, and using the original hubs dust seal all dimensions measured the same and the unit works fine.

    The DT parts manual does not break this dust seal down into individual items, so comparison via the internet does really work. I had emailed DT tech support about steel freehubs in general and will share any info they send back.

    Just another FWIW.

    PK

  2. #2
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    Nice tip. FWIW, however, you may still find you'll notch the freehub body when using a rear cassette with individual cogs. I had an LX cassette on our steel WI hubs and regularly notched them every six months (when it was time for a new freehub). I transferred that LX cassette to our stainless CK freehub and notched it within two months.

    Neither were bad enough to lock the cassette onto the freebub, but they'd have gotten there. We have an XT cassette now, and hope we don't break it (instead of waiting for the hub to grenade again). We have a SRAM 990 waiting in the wings, just in case

  3. #3
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Okayfine
    Nice tip. FWIW, however, you may still find you'll notch the freehub body when using a rear cassette with individual cogs. I had an LX cassette on our steel WI hubs and regularly notched them every six months (when it was time for a new freehub). I transferred that LX cassette to our stainless CK freehub and notched it within two months.

    Neither were bad enough to lock the cassette onto the freebub, but they'd have gotten there. We have an XT cassette now, and hope we don't break it (instead of waiting for the hub to grenade again). We have a SRAM 990 waiting in the wings, just in case
    While accomplishing this task, I pulled our old DT Hugi freehub that was on our 98 Cannondale. While not perfect and with a bit of use, yes it was notched also. The big difference was the aluminum one had to be beat apart from the cassette, the worn steel freehub still slid on and off with no fuss.

    We have run spidered cassettes and fold the #2, #3, or #4 sprocket over.
    We''ll give this a go for now.

    PK

  4. #4
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    I've found that most of the time after the cogs have dug themselves in a mm or two, I will file the aluminum that has been pushed up that's causing the cogs to get stuck. I often find that after a mm or two, the cogs don't keep digging deeper. I mean, I've never seen one dig in more than a mm or two at least.

    Sure like what I think WTB or American Classic does with their bodies by running a strip of steel on the leading edge of three of the splines...but of course none of those hubs are tandem worthy strength.
    www.velocitybicycles.comWhere customers become friends, not simply a dollar sign.

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