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  1. #1
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    Cannondale Tandems - Help Identify

    I am looking at purchasing a tandem and ran across a used /older Cannondale and not sure what model it is or how old it is. The picture is not that good but it looks like an Indy SL fork that was installed afterwards. It is a black/deep purple color. I can take a better close up pictures and the serial number if it helps. I am looking for information about Cannodale tandems. The different models available. What to look out for good and bad. Any assistance would be helpful. Thank you.
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  2. #2
    PMK
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    In 99 they changed the frame and the 99 and after have rear disc caliper mounts.

    98 and prior had various models. It seems all fell under the Los Dos designation in the catalog, but some were actually badged as MTxxxx (800, 1000, 2000, 3000, 4000) also.

    If you can get a serial number, vintage cannondale is a website that should explain it all. Better photos and component level would be an easy way to get close.

    Cannondales are good values and good machines. I would lose the Indy fork though.

    PK

  3. #3
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    Thanks PK.
    Yes, the Indy fork does not seem right on the bike. If I do pick it up I plan on changing out the fork and at least get a front disk set up. I read the thread about suspension forks and it looks like there really is a limited selection. I may even look into a rigid fork if I can find a cannondale in the same deep purple paint and change the brakes to linear pulls.

    As far as parts it is its own parts bin: STX rear derailuer, LX front deraileur, grip shifts, SLR brakes. So I do not think the component level will help me.

    Thank you for pointing me to the vintage website. It seems that there are more road Cannodales than mountain Cannodales. Is there a reason?

  4. #4
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    PK thank you for the site. I checked the S/N and it turns out it is a 1995 MT 1000 with the Diamond Black/Violet Pearl. The parts have been swaped/replaced over the years. It has a some scratches from being a rental bike for three years and then sold to a private owner and sat in a garage till this year. No cracks or dings in the frame. He wants $600 for it. How much would a decent suspension fork cost for it be?

  5. #5
    Long Live Long Rides
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    upgrade

    $600 isn't bad. You should check the gearing as earlier "mountain" tandems often used road gearing. That is fine if you are not going up anything challenging. Front fork (and new hub, wheel, and brakes) will cost a bit depending on the fork. I would suggest 100mm travel max for that frame. If you are doing mostly dirt road and light trail you could get away with something like a Marzocchi dirt jumper + wheel + bb7 brakes = around $400-500, less if you can find good used parts. This also depends on team weight. If you are going to ride hard, I would suggest a different bike.

  6. #6
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    What's "decent?" A Marz DJ series is a few hundred dollars for 100mm travel. Up to $1500 and beyond for a new-tech dual crown setup.

    But then you're faced with the decision on axle standards - stay with 9mm QR or step up to the stiff 15/20mm through-axles (much more appropriate for tandems, especially for disc brakes). And if you step up, that means a new hub and a wheel rebuild.

  7. #7
    PMK
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    What is the tandems size? What size are the riders?

    Fork wise, there are options, and unless you plan to ride hard or live in the mountains, you may be fine with rim brakes until the wheels get trashed.

    If it fits, the price isn't bad. If the fit is poor, keep shopping, there are used good Cannondales for decent prices all the time. $1000 should get you a nice setup, that fits well, possibly has a suspension fork and better components.

    I know this has road tandems as well, but it can serve as a guide or possibly finding a different bike. Read close and look for some trends in model year, parts and size.

    http://bike.jaxed.com/cgi-bin/bike.c...=d&submit=+GO+

    Noticed your location, you may be a bit limited or need to factor in shipping vs upgrading.

    PK

  8. #8
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    The frame size is an 18/16 and it fits us, team weight is 320lbs and yes in our location does not afford us many choices. All the original parts are still on the bike other than the forks and wheels.

    Thank you for all your advice. Many good points made. I made an offer for $300 since I need to replace the forks and wheels and he accepted. We are now proud owners of it and looking forward to hitting the roads/trails. Know I just have to figure out how to get it home and to decide if I want to go with a single or double crown forks.

    Thanks Again.

  9. #9
    PMK
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    You got a good deal.

    Find yourself a decent Fox 36 air fork with 100mm travel, Avid BB7 disc in front, Avid V Brakes on the back. Same levers as a set.

    If the paint is not great, strip it and polish it.

    Ride the wheels off it and make other changes as needed.

    Be careful on the rear wheel axle width, that bike is from a time when it may have been a 140mm as opposed to 145mm. Bottom line, don't just stuff a wheel in and go, or bend the frame to fit, get the right axle length.

    PK

  10. #10
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    I do like the polished aluminum look. Is there a safe way to strip the paint and to keep it polished or clear coated. There is alot of tubing to keep polished.

  11. #11
    PMK
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    Quote Originally Posted by Old School HPV
    There is alot of tubing to keep polished.
    Get over it...like a hot chick there is maintenance involved.

    Seriously, it will take some decent chemical paint stripper. Then it need some elbow grease to bring the finish up. Once done it will be nice.

    If the paint is decent, ride it until it's not.

    BTW, we loved our 1998 MT3000. It was a great all around bike with excellent manners fast and slow.

    PK

  12. #12
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    PK - I have a set of front and rear XT deraileurs, XT top thumb shifters, XT linear brakes, and Scott lites bars with the bar ends bent into them that I am going to install this weekend.

    The Fox fork are pretty pricey. We'll have to ride the Indy and the current set of wheels until I can afford the forks and wheels at one time.

  13. #13
    PMK
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    With you building the bike with period correct stuff, if you can find a Marzocchi Super T and shorten the travel, or even a Marzocchi Drop Off Triple, they can be travel reduced and will look period correct, PLUS be quite adequate for handling and suspension when dialed in.

    PK

  14. #14
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    Will finding parts for these forks be an issue if i were to find one of these forks? It wouldnt make any sense getting a component that could not be serviced. That is why I like the older XT components, they are simple durable and made to last with just some routine cleaning and lubricating.

    I am discovering that the Indy is mostly a spring/elastomer fork that is not dependent on O-rings and seals to keep air pressure like the old Mag 20 (that I have a few for just seals). Is there anything wrong with using the Indy?

  15. #15
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    New Bike

    You did get a good deal - congrats. I would be careful about the scott lf bars. I have loved them since I started using them in 1995. That said, I wouldn't use them on a tandem. You will find it takes a LOT more arm power to control the front of a tandem. The scott bars are very narrow and very thin. Add to that their age and the fatigue mode of aluminium - I could easily see one snapping in tandem use. I still use a pair on my commuter and have 4 sets hanging in the garage.

  16. #16
    PMK
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    The Drop Off Triple and Super T I am referring to are vintage 2006 ish. Thing is they still retain that retro look and are not overly expensive. The drop Off Triple is a common take off from Kona Stinky bikes. Super T was aftermarket. Both use the same basic structural base with the internals being different.

    If you find a Drop Off Triple used, make certain the fork tubes are not all beat up. This is a very easy fork to work with and shorten for proper handling on that older frame. It also has air assist for the springs.

    PK

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