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  1. #1
    Formerly Carlos9
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    Tuggnuts... Am I doing it wrong?

    I picked up a pair of Tuggnuts to put on my Monkey, in the hopes of fixing the rear wheel slippage I've been experiencing. After a couple rides with them installed, it almost seems worse... The drive side Tuggnut appears to be acting as a pivot, giving the wheel more reason to slip, whilst the opposite side does nothing as it backs out of the drop out. I'm at the point where I'm having to crank the QR down as tight, if not tighter than before I installed the Tuggnuts. My next attempt will be a Shimano QR, with no Tuggnuts. In the meantime... am I missing something with these damn things?
    You only live once but if you do it right, once is enough.

  2. #2
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    It's most likely your QR skewers. Pick up some XT skewers and keep the Tuggnuts on. I run a Tuggnut on the drive side of my 1x1 and with an XT skewer I haven't had a single time my axle slipped under acceleration or braking. I'm assuming you have a single speed KM? I run XT skewers on my Krampus (set up 1x10 and no Tuggnut) with the axle all the way forward and haven't had any slippage.
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  3. #3
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    I have a TuggNut on the drive side of my SS '11 KM. I don't see how my rear axle could possibly slip with the TuggNut in place. I would have to bend or break the TuggNut to get any slippage. And I'm nowhere near heavy enough to do that.

    This isn't my bike, but it is a picture of how I have mine installed:

    http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1020/1...8a690af5b9.jpg

    Plenty of other images out there on line.

  4. #4
    Formerly Carlos9
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    Quote Originally Posted by sasquatch rides a SS View Post
    It's most likely your QR skewers. Pick up some XT skewers and keep the Tuggnuts on. I run a Tuggnut on the drive side of my 1x1 and with an XT skewer I haven't had a single time my axle slipped under acceleration or braking. I'm assuming you have a single speed KM? I run XT skewers on my Krampus (set up 1x10 and no Tuggnut) with the axle all the way forward and haven't had any slippage.
    You assumed right, ss Monkey. Changing the skewers is my next option but doesn't that ultimately eliminate the need for Tugnutts? Also, what length are you using with the single Tuggnut?
    You only live once but if you do it right, once is enough.

  5. #5
    Formerly Carlos9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Spinymouse View Post
    I have a TuggNut on the drive side of my SS '11 KM. I don't see how my rear axle could possibly slip with the TuggNut in place. I would have to bend or break the TuggNut to get any slippage. And I'm nowhere near heavy enough to do that.

    This isn't my bike, but it is a picture of how I have mine installed:

    http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1020/1...8a690af5b9.jpg

    Plenty of other images out there on line.
    Mine are installed exactly the same way... on both sides! The drive side appears to "pivot" (for want of a better word) not slip and the opposite side just backs out as its moving away from the drop out. The drive side Tuggnut is tightened as tight as i can get it with my fingers, to the point the chain is almost too tight. The non drive side is relatively loose, if i tighten it any more it pulls the wheel way off center. I weigh in at 185, I'm not overly strong on the climbs but I can make my rear wheel slip on even the shortest hills. My QR is tightened to the point of needing a rag to undo it. Any suggestions?
    You only live once but if you do it right, once is enough.

  6. #6
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    You should only need one; if two aren't working, something has to be up. Do you have a photo?

    For me, I needed one on the non-drive side (which I was assured was the wrong way to do it) to solve my problem (geared bike w/ trailer-hitch skewer that could not grab as tight as the brake caliper would pull the disc). Once I ditched the trailer-hitch skewer (kids outgrew trailer) I could put on an xt skewer and I was good to go.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlos9 View Post
    The drive side appears to "pivot" (for want of a better word) not slip and the opposite side just backs out as its moving away from the drop out. Any suggestions?
    Tugnuts can only stop the wheel from moving forward. They don't do anything with regards to the non-driveside moving backwards.

    You can get rid of the non-driveside tugnut, rough up the dropouts so there is more friction and use a skewer with higher clamping force.
    Safe riding,

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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by vikb View Post
    You can get rid of the non-driveside tugnut, .
    Hows he then going to open that second bottle of beer?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by rifraf View Post
    Hows he then going to open that second bottle of beer?
    You can open two beers with one Tugnut simultaneously.
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  10. #10
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    I solved a slipping axle by "downgrading" to an XT skewer. Much more clamping force with the cam-action (and less effort) than the Salsa skewers I was using.

  11. #11
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    I will back up the above claims with my experience.

    After reading Sheldon Brown's dissertation on skewers, I'm officially sold on the coffee can full of old Shimano skewers I've had laying around since the mid 90s.

    I run my Troll with the rear wheel in the forward-most position. I had tensioners on both sides (not Tuggnuts) and would get backward slippage when braking. So, I roughed the dropouts, switched to an old Shimano skewer, and ditched the tensioners. They're thicker, the nut/cam are steel, and the cam is internal. It's pretty beefy by comparison and can be clamped down tighter than I feel comfortable with. Haven't had any slipping since!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by jesusburger View Post
    I solved a slipping axle by "downgrading" to an XT skewer. Much more clamping force with the cam-action (and less effort) than the Salsa skewers I was using.
    That's not really a "downgrade"....The only thing Salsa skewers have going for them are cool colors IMO.
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  13. #13
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    Tuggnuts... Am I doing it wrong?

    Threaded rear axle did the trick for me! I tried a long 145mm Bontrager skewer and it didn't help any. Now I run a Surly threaded rear hub and 2 Tugnuts (mainly just for looks ). Definitely no problems!!!


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  14. #14
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    I just built a '13 km ss w a tuggnut and dt Swiss rear skewer. I'm 225 pounds and ride fairly aggressively. I just recently snapped my redline monocog drive side chainstay climbing a hill. So i built this km in hopes of a
    Stronger bike. Tuggnut in place on the second ride I was climbing a steep hill, hammering and sure enough, snap. Look down and rear dt Swiss skewer and tuggnut had snapped and were nowhere to be found. I had snapped the rear
    Axle. The tension pressure on climb pulled rear cog so much that it snapped the axle. Found the end of skewer a few yards away but tuggnut was nowhere to be found. Must've shot a ways down the hill. I'm looking into a through bolt conversion now. Anyone do this?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by toolundrto View Post
    I'm looking into a through bolt conversion now. Anyone do this?


    I converted my FS MTB from QR to 10mm through axle with a DT Swiss RWS skewer and some 10mm Hope end caps. You can also get a bolt in axle for this hub - Hope EVO Pro2.

    vikapproved | Hope Pro 2 Hub QR to 10mm RWS Conversion

    What hub are you running?

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  16. #16
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    I'm running a Stan's 3.30ti SS hub

  17. #17
    ONe less gear
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    I switched from quick release to solid axle in the rear and hollow axle in the front and the tugnutts work fine now.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pool Boy View Post
    Mine are installed exactly the same way... on both sides! The drive side appears to "pivot" (for want of a better word) not slip and the opposite side just backs out as its moving away from the drop out. The drive side Tuggnut is tightened as tight as i can get it with my fingers, to the point the chain is almost too tight. The non drive side is relatively loose, if i tighten it any more it pulls the wheel way off center. I weigh in at 185, I'm not overly strong on the climbs but I can make my rear wheel slip on even the shortest hills. My QR is tightened to the point of needing a rag to undo it. Any suggestions?
    I realize I'm late, but did you ever get this resolved? I like using two Tuggs too. I only had a problem once, and I'd like to tell you about it.

    Your situation sounds similar, so maybe this will help you. I had my two Tuggs "slipping" with a Quick Release Skewer and their respective QR washers (supplied with the Tuggs).

    The frame was steel, and the dropouts were "thinner" than the previous bike these wheels lived on. The hollow axle stuck out past the outer-face of the dropouts. Like the distance of the hollow axle from the LOCKNUT was like 5mm, but my frame's dropouts were only like 4mm thick. You know what I'm saying?

    So, this made the quick release skewers only tighten down on the hollow axles of the hubs (it was such a close clearance, that it wasn't really visibly visible, and even with the QR tightened down, it would grab the dropouts enough to "feel" secure on the workstand). The Tuggs were not sitting totally flat against the dorpowtz.

    I filed (belt-grinder) the hollow axles down about a millimeter each, and everything got super-tight and properly mated.

    (I know I probably made no sense, and that sucks)

    The QR worked without the TuggNuts, because the QR's nuts have "hollows" carved out of them. Channels that "hug" around the axle, and clears it in case it sticks out a little past thinner drop-outs.

    The Tuggnuts don't have this built in "channel for clearance" and sits flush against the face of the dropouts, so grinding the hub's axles down a little was one way to get everything to work happily together. It has never slipped since. That is all. Good day.

  19. #19
    Formerly Carlos9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gritter View Post
    I realize I'm late, but did you ever get this resolved? I like using two Tuggs too. I only had a problem once, and I'd like to tell you about it.

    Your situation sounds similar, so maybe this will help you. I had my two Tuggs "slipping" with a Quick Release Skewer and their respective QR washers (supplied with the Tuggs).

    The frame was steel, and the dropouts were "thinner" than the previous bike these wheels lived on. The hollow axle stuck out past the outer-face of the dropouts. Like the distance of the hollow axle from the LOCKNUT was like 5mm, but my frame's dropouts were only like 4mm thick. You know what I'm saying?

    So, this made the quick release skewers only tighten down on the hollow axles of the hubs (it was such a close clearance, that it wasn't really visibly visible, and even with the QR tightened down, it would grab the dropouts enough to "feel" secure on the workstand). The Tuggs were not sitting totally flat against the dorpowtz.

    I filed (belt-grinder) the hollow axles down about a millimeter each, and everything got super-tight and properly mated.

    (I know I probably made no sense, and that sucks)

    The QR worked without the TuggNuts, because the QR's nuts have "hollows" carved out of them. Channels that "hug" around the axle, and clears it in case it sticks out a little past thinner drop-outs.

    The Tuggnuts don't have this built in "channel for clearance" and sits flush against the face of the dropouts, so grinding the hub's axles down a little was one way to get everything to work happily together. It has never slipped since. That is all. Good day.
    And good day to you Sir!

    Thanks for the advice!

    I basically fixed the issue by using an xt skewer as suggested by many on here. However, I'm still having to use the Tugg Nuts as nothing more than spacers to keep the cam of the skewer far enough out of the recess "flange" of the dropout so I can close it. I've kept the other one on the other side, just in case the "opening a second beer" scenario occurs!

    It still slips on occasion but I suspect that's more to do with my huge legs...
    You only live once but if you do it right, once is enough.

  20. #20
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    Tuggnuts... Am I doing it wrong?

    Super interesting. I have two tugnuts on my Krampus SS, running a salsa quick release, and have had zero issues. But wow, are those things heavy... Perhaps a switch to a simple, old school XT quick release will accomplish the same thing and save 1/2 a pound...

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by CCSS View Post
    Perhaps a switch to a simple, old school XT quick release will accomplish the same thing and save 1/2 a pound...
    Tried that and it didn't work for me. But, it can't hurt to try.
    Safe riding,

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  22. #22
    Formerly Carlos9
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    Re: Tuggnuts... Am I doing it wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by CCSS View Post
    Super interesting. I have two tugnuts on my Krampus SS, running a salsa quick release, and have had zero issues. But wow, are those things heavy... Perhaps a switch to a simple, old school XT quick release will accomplish the same thing and save 1/2 a pound...
    Does the Krampus have the same "shrouded" rear dropouts as the Karate Monkey? If so, you might need to keep the tugnutts as spacers so the head of the skewer clears the shroud... I guess you could use something lighter but then you wouldn't be able to open beers...



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  23. #23
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    Tuggnuts... Am I doing it wrong?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pool Boy View Post
    Does the Krampus have the same "shrouded" rear dropouts as the Karate Monkey? ... I guess you could use something lighter but then you wouldn't be able to open beers...
    I'm sitting in an airport bar far away from my bike, so can't run out to check... On the other hand, I've learned that it's just as easy to open a beer using a SPD pedal!

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