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  1. #1
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    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?

    I am new to bike touring and I am no bike gear head, which is why I want your advice. I am planning a touring trip in South America next winter and I wanted to get some thoughts on frames, parts any builds you can suggest I check out.

    Frame:
    Right now, my top frame choice is the Troll. But I do like the idea of the larger wheel size of the ECR. Is it really that hard to find parts for them in other countries?

    And I gather that the world troller is only worth it is you want to use a bike case for airports? Is it worth it?

    Any other non Surly frames to recommend? I'm more familiar with the surlys and have heard from friends and loads of internet people that they love their bikes. What else will take a beating and allow so many build options, plus be comfortable on longer hauls?

    Other parts:
    This is going to be where I need the most help. After some research I really want to go with the rolhoff speed hub. other than that I'm not set on anything yet. let me know what is dependable and the best bang for my buck.


    Share any good build links please.
    Thanks,
    Nick

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by TripL View Post
    I am new to bike touring and I am no bike gear head, which is why I want your advice. I am planning a touring trip in South America next winter and I wanted to get some thoughts on frames, parts any builds you can suggest I check out.

    Frame:
    Right now, my top frame choice is the Troll. But I do like the idea of the larger wheel size of the ECR. Is it really that hard to find parts for them in other countries?

    And I gather that the world troller is only worth it is you want to use a bike case for airports? Is it worth it?

    Any other non Surly frames to recommend? I'm more familiar with the surlys and have heard from friends and loads of internet people that they love their bikes. What else will take a beating and allow so many build options, plus be comfortable on longer hauls?

    Other parts:
    This is going to be where I need the most help. After some research I really want to go with the rolhoff speed hub. other than that I'm not set on anything yet. let me know what is dependable and the best bang for my buck.


    Share any good build links please.
    Thanks,
    Nick
    Hola Nick,

    IŽm not an expert on bikes either, but let me know if I can be of any assistance while youŽre down here or if you need any tip/suggestion regarding travelling in South America... what I can tell you is youŽll only find 29" rims & tires in BIG cities (at least in Argentina).

    I guess the best bike for your trip will depend mainly on what kind of terrain are you planning to ride:
    a) Are you planning to follow Carretera Panamericana (most of your trip will be on pavement)?
    b) Are you planning to ride off the beaten track?

    If youŽre planning option "A" it doesn'tŽt really matter what tire size you choose... as youŽve less chances to break a rim in the middle of nowhere, just carrying an extra folding tire (+ tubes) might solve most of the usual problems.

    If youŽre planning to ride mixed surfaces then you should also need to take a Salsa Fargo in consideration...

    Rolhoff IGHs are amazing and if youŽve the budget IŽll suggest to get one... but you should also know that despite being bullet proof, if it fails down here (South America) youŽve very little chances to get it fixed

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  3. #3
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    From the number of blogs I've read, you can't go wrong with any of the bikes you listed. Yes, some parts are harder to find than others, but if this dude can tour around the world on his Pugsley without issues, than you're pretty safe with any of the other Surly bikes.

    https://joecruz.wordpress.com/2011/1...ogress-report/

    Find what fits you best and go with it.

  4. #4
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    There is a caveat on his trip. Joe went to South Am for 6 months? and luckily he did not need to look for replacement parts for his bike. I doubt if the Pugsley breaks down easily because that is a tank but imagine if you are on a 1-plus year tour. Do you ship the new tires ahead of you before you leave for the trip? Order it online once you need it and hope customs in South Am wont give you a headache? Ofcourse the OP will only ride for a season down south so it might not be an issue.

    I'd say if it is just 6 months you are planning, go with the ECR or Troll especially if you are leaning on riding dirt roads. Troll with the Dirt Wizards if you are <5'4" in height. Rohloff is good if you intend riding off-road, install and forget. I don't think it warrants to use a Rohloff if you are riding pavement all the time.

    ECR --- With regards to the bigger wheels, the ECR with Duallys/Knards rolls so much better and eats baby head rocks like its nothing. Once it picks up momentum you are all set. I don't know if the 29er Dirt Wizard is already out but the prototype I saw that Neil at Cyclemonkey tested looks interesting. I'd put that in front and the Knards on the back if I do it again. If you plan on using a rear rack, go with the OMM, I'm using the Tubus Logo and it rubs when loaded if I stand and hammer on the pedals. Super annoying. The Tubus tapers on top where it rubs on the fatter 3 inch tire vs. the OMM which is "boxed" on top so you have more space even if you factor the flex. The ECR doesn't fit on your normal bike box so I have to use two boxes for my flight just to let you know.

    Troll -- You can't go wrong with the Troll either. My wife has been riding it since Banff and up to now here in Mexico, she's been very happy. She likes how the Troll ride compared to her Long Haul trucker.

    Rohloff -- We've only had the Rohloff for about three months so no long term issues yet that we've come across. We started our tour using derailleur drivetrains, mine was an XT shadow but was already 2 years old and hers was a 1 year old used for commuting XTR. I could not fathom buying a bike part that is more expensive than my bike!!

    After 3 months of riding I was already tired tuning my gears every so often especially when you are riding in mud and rain and more mud. Plus its one thing to tune you're gears at home and its another if you are tired and exhausted from the ride and the next day you HAVE to do it. All you want is to just ride. I was tired with the ghost shifting, chain falling or the front derailleur not working because of mud and you have to manually put the chain to the smaller chainring. It was easy for me to decide because I have to look after 2 bikes so we we're pretty set in buying Rohloff hubs. We have it on our budget but I thought people are just exaggerating the pros of the Rohloff.

    Well try to reach South Am before winter. Maybe we can ride together.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by pokerface View Post
    There is a caveat on his trip. Joe went to South Am for 6 months? and luckily he did not need to look for replacement parts for his bike. I doubt if the Pugsley breaks down easily because that is a tank but imagine if you are on a 1-plus year tour. Do you ship the new tires ahead of you before you leave for the trip? Order it online once you need it and hope customs in South Am wont give you a headache? Ofcourse the OP will only ride for a season down south so it might not be an issue.
    Agreed that equipment list would probably look different on a 1+ year tour, as the volatility of part failure increases dramatically. However, I'm still not convinced that a specialty bike like a Pug should be counted out. Shrinking world and internet access from just about every corner of the earth really mitigates any concerns regarding fat wheels. Plus, Surly's world-wide presence means better access to their parts. Worst case scenario, looks like regular 26" wheels fit the Pug in a pinch anyway.

    There seems to be a continually growing number of folks headed down South and world wide on fat tired bikes, be it a Pug, Krampus/ECR, etc. Most report zero issues. This new 27+ tire size has intrigued me, though. Less rolling resistance than 29+ or Fat 26, more capable than 26+.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Agreed that equipment list would probably look different on a 1+ year tour, as the volatility of part failure increases dramatically. However, I'm still not convinced that a specialty bike like a Pug should be counted out. Shrinking world and internet access from just about every corner of the earth really mitigates any concerns regarding fat wheels. Plus, Surly's world-wide presence means better access to their parts. Worst case scenario, looks like regular 26" wheels fit the Pug in a pinch anyway.

    There seems to be a continually growing number of folks headed down South and world wide on fat tired bikes, be it a Pug, Krampus/ECR, etc. Most report zero issues. This new 27+ tire size has intrigued me, though. Less rolling resistance than 29+ or Fat 26, more capable than 26+.
    Hola Phsycle,

    Unfortunately the world is NOT shrinking that fast in South America and right now imports are almost frozen in Argentina

    If I were riding something unconventional down here (26+, 650B+, 29+, or fat tires) IŽll definitively be carrying a foldable spare (even if it means carrying 2lb) to avoid the headaches & delays that involves dealing customs in South America...

    You can obviously be very lucky and not need any spares during a long expedition; but hoping for the best is a BIG risk when youŽre off the beaten track in South America

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  7. #7
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    The 26" for expedition argument used to be a lot stronger than it is today.

    29er and general 700c wheels seem to become more common each year.
    Also, many people start to realize that, even if you can get a replacement part, it's quality will generally be really bad so end up with mail order or carrying a spare anyways.

    Nowadays there are tons of mid to high volume specialized touring 700c tires, so that's also no an issue

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola Phsycle,

    Unfortunately the world is NOT shrinking that fast in South America and right now imports are almost frozen in Argentina

    If I were riding something unconventional down here (26+, 650B+, 29+, or fat tires) IŽll definitively be carrying a foldable spare (even if it means carrying 2lb) to avoid the headaches & delays that involves dealing customs in South America...

    You can obviously be very lucky and not need any spares during a long expedition; but hoping for the best is a BIG risk when youŽre off the beaten track in South America

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Seems to me a fairly simple solution of buying some extra parts, keeping it boxed up at home and mailed out by your family/friends if you need it? Of course, in addition to carry a spare with you.

    Although I haven't toured extensively, if I were to leave for SA today, I'd probably take the Pug. The comfort over the 26x2.3" tire and 29x2.4" tire (both which I have on other bikes) is amazing. Again, perhaps a 26+ or 27.5+ would be a nice compromise as well, but for me, a nice 26x4" tire does the trick.

    Either way, have a fun time. This guy is still on tour on his Troll, I believe. Very capable rig.

    Bike Wanderer

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Seems to me a fairly simple solution of buying some extra parts, keeping it boxed up at home and mailed out by your family/friends if you need it? Of course, in addition to carry a spare with you.

    Although I haven't toured extensively, if I were to leave for SA today, I'd probably take the Pug. The comfort over the 26x2.3" tire and 29x2.4" tire (both which I have on other bikes) is amazing. Again, perhaps a 26+ or 27.5+ would be a nice compromise as well, but for me, a nice 26x4" tire does the trick.

    Either way, have a fun time. This guy is still on tour on his Troll, I believe. Very capable rig.

    Bike Wanderer
    The Bike wanderer website you linked actually rides a Troll but not 26+ tires.

    When I was researching for the bikes we wanted to take on our 2/3 years tour I was pretty much reading Cass's blog, Logan's and some other pips who trumpets the niche bikes that will be "fun" to ride on tour. I did buy an ECR and the Troll for my wife because we though those were the perfect bikes for us based on my research.

    Cass rode initially on a Santos Travelmaster, then replaced it eventually with other bikes, Troll, Ogre then eventually a fat bike. So that's four bikes for the whole tour. Rarely do people go on transcontinental ride and use for bikes. For some time he carried folding tires too. Logan tours half a year at most then goes back stateside. Joe went to South Am but by the time he left, his tires were pretty much threadbare according to his blog. The bikegreaseandcoffee dude rode fattires in South Am but had a friend met him in Peru? who carried his spares.They all toured but not in one straight year where you end up in South Am or god in Central Asia with worn out moving parts.

    I'm slowly realizing the important caveats of those blogs. The all important solution on how to go about sourcing your replacements wasn't really mentioned . I don't know why.

    Forget about South Am. We were in Tucson and was trying to buy a folding Knard and a Dirt Wizard that we can bring with us before we cross to Mexico, the Brick and Mortar bike shops, authorized Surly dealers, don't have it in stock. They said they can order it and will arrive in 4 days. I could do that too without them.

    Don't get me wrong because you have to put a gun in my head to swap my ECR for another bike especially here in Mexico where you can string and connect off-roads from one city to the next. I'm just saying you have to factor in how are you going to get your replacements, very important, and like Federico said it gets a bit ugly once you're in South Am because it's not as straight forward as you'd hope so.

    Anyhow, as per OP's question, I sometimes find the ECR a bit of an overkill especially when we're just on well maintained unpaved roads so I'm not sure about the Pugs or something fatter.

  10. #10
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    No, I wasn't saying the Bikewanderer guy was on 26+, just pointing out a cool blog. He rides through some hairy stuff on the Troll.

    Great thing about all of the bikes mentioned is, you can make other parts work in a pinch. Troll can take 26" tires, but also can fit 27.5 and 29 wheels if needed. Your ECR can take regular 29/700c tires. The Pug can take regular 26" wheels, or redished 29". Specialty bikes with the ability of being fitted with regular parts can at least bring some comfort.

    Speaking of, 29+ tires are starting to be more prevalent. You can get Bontrager, Maxxis and others who make that tire size. Same with 26" fat. Hopefully the trend will continue.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    No, I wasn't saying the Bikewanderer guy was on 26+, just pointing out a cool blog. He rides through some hairy stuff on the Troll.

    Great thing about all of the bikes mentioned is, you can make other parts work in a pinch. Troll can take 26" tires, but also can fit 27.5 and 29 wheels if needed. Your ECR can take regular 29/700c tires. The Pug can take regular 26" wheels, or redished 29". Specialty bikes with the ability of being fitted with regular parts can at least bring some comfort.

    Speaking of, 29+ tires are starting to be more prevalent. You can get Bontrager, Maxxis and others who make that tire size. Same with 26" fat. Hopefully the trend will continue.
    Just saying the OP should really factor in how he'll source out his replacements for a niche bike outside the comforts of US and Canada.

    Same with regular bikes, it brings comfort that it can fit regular parts. When I decided to buy my ECR, my line of reasoning was, same as regular bikes, you can jury rig it with regular parts, you're just not maximizing its capability. but atleast we have the versatility right?.

    I did swap a two inch slick 29er ion my Duallys in Northern BC out of curiosity and want to save my knards when we rode east on pavement from Prince Rupert to Banff then switched again to my knards for the Great Divide. I'm sure some will say that's too narrow for my rims but it worked and loaded. I'm actually using a 26in inner tube right now on one of my tires because we can't find any bike shop with 29in tube here in North Mexico and i guess it would be another 4 weeks before we reach Mexico City

  12. #12
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    Hopefully you won't be ghetto rigging too many thing on there! Do you have a blog of your travels? If not, feel free to throw in some pics. (maybe in another thread...).

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    After riding my fatbike around town... I can't ever see wanting to ride 4" tires anywhere except snow, sand, or the occasional oddball day of mountain biking. They are dog slow, even giving a good effort.

    Just buy a Troll.
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    Quote Originally Posted by phsycle View Post
    Hopefully you won't be ghetto rigging too many thing on there! Do you have a blog of your travels? If not, feel free to throw in some pics. (maybe in another thread...).
    Bro, funny you said that. That's why I emphasize the sourcing of replacement. I have a vested interest when I invite my friends to meet us somewhere south. I hope I won't have too much ghetto rigging on this poor ECR. I feel freaking guilty every time I have to attach or replace something on my ECR that's not supposed to be there. I feel I'm defacing it.

  15. #15
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    S&S couplers

    Quote Originally Posted by TripL View Post
    Frame:
    Right now, my top frame choice is the Troll. But I do like the idea of the larger wheel size of the ECR. Is it really that hard to find parts for them in other countries?

    And I gather that the world troller is only worth it is you want to use a bike case for airports? Is it worth it?
    Nick,
    After waiting for over a year for the World Troller frameset to be released, I finally broke down and had an ECR frame retrofitted with S&S couplers. This is the best bike frame that I have ever owned! The S&S couplers allow you to break the bike down for shipping either in an airport regulation sized box or by postal service. I have used the S&S couplers for years on a Trucker Deluxe frame and traveled across four continents saving thousands of dollars on airline freight bills. You do not need the special suitcases or bags for shipping. Just find a couple of cardboard boxes which are about 34" and stuff the frame and wheels in. The 29ers ship just as well as the 26" wheels.

    As for the availability of 29" tires, wheels etc. in developing countries.... these are still hard to find but my solution is to always carry a spare folding tire, three tubes and a few spare spokes for my 29er. Any major breakdown will cause you to have shipping delays whether you are running 26" wheels or 29ers. That's just a part of touring. Learn to relax and take the extra time to explore the area while waiting for the parts to arrive.

    Have a great trip.Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-ecr-charlotte-amalie.jpg
    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-lht_deluxe_fullyloaded.jpg
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    Nick,
    After waiting for over a year for the World Troller frameset to be released, I finally broke down and had an ECR frame retrofitted with S&S couplers. This is the best bike frame that I have ever owned! The S&S couplers allow you to break the bike down for shipping either in an airport regulation sized box or by postal service. I have used the S&S couplers for years on a Trucker Deluxe frame and traveled across four continents saving thousands of dollars on airline freight bills. You do not need the special suitcases or bags for shipping. Just find a couple of cardboard boxes which are about 34" and stuff the frame and wheels in. The 29ers ship just as well as the 26" wheels.

    As for the availability of 29" tires, wheels etc. in developing countries.... these are still hard to find but my solution is to always carry a spare folding tire, three tubes and a few spare spokes for my 29er. Any major breakdown will cause you to have shipping delays whether you are running 26" wheels or 29ers. That's just a part of touring. Learn to relax and take the extra time to explore the area while waiting for the parts to arrive.

    Have a great trip.Click image for larger version. 

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    Hola Luce,

    Your S&S/Rohloff ECR looks AWESOME and I'm sure you'll have amazing Adventures!!! I'll definitively keep an eye on your site

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Cycling in developing countries, making & printing portraits for those families who've NONE. www.theironlyportrait.com

  17. #17
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    ECR Couplers & Cage Mount

    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    Nick,
    After waiting for over a year for the World Troller frameset to be released, I finally broke down and had an ECR frame retrofitted with S&S couplers. This is the best bike frame that I have ever owned! The S&S couplers allow you to break the bike down for shipping either in an airport regulation sized box or by postal service. I have used the S&S couplers for years on a Trucker Deluxe frame and traveled across four continents saving thousands of dollars on airline freight bills. You do not need the special suitcases or bags for shipping. Just find a couple of cardboard boxes which are about 34" and stuff the frame and wheels in. The 29ers ship just as well as the 26" wheels.

    As for the availability of 29" tires, wheels etc. in developing countries.... these are still hard to find but my solution is to always carry a spare folding tire, three tubes and a few spare spokes for my 29er. Any major breakdown will cause you to have shipping delays whether you are running 26" wheels or 29ers. That's just a part of touring. Learn to relax and take the extra time to explore the area while waiting for the parts to arrive.

    Have a great trip
    Hi, nice bikes, especially the ECR.
    I see you managed to keep a bottle on the underside of your down tube.
    This is a concern with regards making a coupler decision on an Ogre.
    If you find time could you put up a close up pic of the area?
    Was there any issue with the coupler position and the original cage mount?

  18. #18
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    Bottle Cage

    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-ecr_build-001.jpgTroll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-ecr_build-002.jpg

    Bilenky Cycle Works did an excellent job of installing the S&S couplers. The downtube was cut precisely between the two existing braze-ons so a stainless water cage can be attached over the coupler. This has the added advantage of "locking" the coupler down and making it impossible to accidentally loosen up. It does take an extra few minutes to break the bike down though.

    Quote Originally Posted by rifraf View Post
    Hi, nice bikes, especially the ECR.
    I see you managed to keep a bottle on the underside of your down tube.
    This is a concern with regards making a coupler decision on an Ogre.
    If you find time could you put up a close up pic of the area?
    Was there any issue with the coupler position and the original cage mount?
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheirOnlyPortrait View Post
    Hola Luce,

    Your S&S/Rohloff ECR looks AWESOME and I'm sure you'll have amazing Adventures!!! I'll definitively keep an eye on your site

    Saludos,
    Federico
    Hola Federico,
    When are you planning the South American trip? I am now in the Virgin Islands but may be going to Mexico from here to bike south. Are you in Mexico now?
    Luce
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    world troller with S&S!!

    old thread but Ill answer 'cause Im sitting here.
    I am on tour in Asia with a surly LHT that has the S&S couplers. It is no longer produced by surly, but the world troller has S&S. They function perfectly, and the couplers are the strongest part of the frame. I do not understand why they are not more popular. For traveling they are awesome because you can make the package small enough to put in a bus or taxi ( I did both of these on the way here) and then is the savings on the flight. I saved $200 on excess charges on the planes over here to Asia, and then $200 back and I bought the frame on ebay for $700 so in one more trip Ill say the frame was essentially free.
    Even though I have the Long Haul Trucker with S&S, Im stressing out about whether I should get the world troller w/S&S also. Even though I dont see how I am supposed to ride two touring bikes at the same time. Maybe Ill find a girlfriend and she can ride one.
    Anyway, if you are still connected to this thread: What did you end up getting? Troll/Ecr?

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    Alaskadude - I also used a Trucker Deluxe with S&S while touring the middle east and Australia. I ended up getting an ECR retrofitted with S&S couplers because it took Surly so long to get the World Troller to market. In fact, I have yet to see a World Troller for sale anywhere and Surly does not allow the shipping of frames so it would be difficult to get one if found. Other than the wheel size, I didn't see much difference between the frames at first. Now, after riding the ECR for a while, I am glad I made this choice. 29"+ wheels feel so much better on rough terrain and the 3" Knard tires are great. I can't see myself trading up to anything better in the future. A coupled ECR should fill all the boxes for loaded touring. If you have access to a Troll with S&S couplers, I would go for it. The Troll is a lot more versatile than the LHT especially on rougher roads and it is a beast of burden. You can always use the LHT for a commuter.
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    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    Alaskadude - I also used a Trucker Deluxe with S&S while touring the middle east and Australia. I ended up getting an ECR retrofitted with S&S couplers because it took Surly so long to get the World Troller to market. In fact, I have yet to see a World Troller for sale anywhere and Surly does not allow the shipping of frames so it would be difficult to get one if found. Other than the wheel size, I didn't see much difference between the frames at first. Now, after riding the ECR for a while, I am glad I made this choice. 29"+ wheels feel so much better on rough terrain and the 3" Knard tires are great. I can't see myself trading up to anything better in the future. A coupled ECR should fill all the boxes for loaded touring. If you have access to a Troll with S&S couplers, I would go for it. The Troll is a lot more versatile than the LHT especially on rougher roads and it is a beast of burden. You can always use the LHT for a commuter.
    yea, I live in USA, not Asia. Fairbanks, Alaska. I think you used to live there? Beav sports will get me one

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    Yes, I sure did. I had a little cabin off of Goldstream Road. That was many years ago when I ran dogs. Wish I had a fat tire bike back then. I would love to do the Iditarod by bike.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    In fact, I have yet to see a World Troller for sale anywhere and Surly does not allow the shipping of frames so it would be difficult to get one if found.
    There was a significant amount of time between the announcement of the World Troller and it actually becoming available, however, I placed an order for one this summer just a couple of weeks before it came into stock. Two weeks later, I had it.

    I haven't heard of any shortages since it was released, but then I haven't tried to order a 2nd one.

    It's true that Surly isn't keen on selling frames to individuals, but if you go through a bike shop, you should be fine, and some bike shops have no issue with getting a frame and mailing it a customer.

    So, it's an old thread, and the info is likely irrelevant, but I suspect that if someone wanted a World Troller frame today, it wouldn't be a problem.

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    That's easy for you to say....try getting one to the Virgin Islands. For that matter, try finding a bike shop in the Virgin Islands. It is good to know that the Troller is available now.
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    Deserthawk
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  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    That's easy for you to say....try getting one to the Virgin Islands. For that matter, try finding a bike shop in the Virgin Islands. It is good to know that the Troller is available now.
    Didn't think we were talking about getting one for you. And you're right, I have no experience getting a bike in the Virgin Islands, but I don't know why a World Troller would be more difficult to get than any other Surly now that they seem to be in stock.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob_E View Post
    There was a significant amount of time between the announcement of the World Troller and it actually becoming available, however, I placed an order for one this summer just a couple of weeks before it came into stock. Two weeks later, I had it.

    I haven't heard of any shortages since it was released, but then I haven't tried to order a 2nd one.

    It's true that Surly isn't keen on selling frames to individuals, but if you go through a bike shop, you should be fine, and some bike shops have no issue with getting a frame and mailing it a customer.

    So, it's an old thread, and the info is likely irrelevant, but I suspect that if someone wanted a World Troller frame today, it wouldn't be a problem.
    Yes, there is an official dealership in my town in Alaska. They can order me one.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by deserthawk View Post
    Yes, I sure did. I had a little cabin off of Goldstream Road. That was many years ago when I ran dogs. Wish I had a fat tire bike back then. I would love to do the Iditarod by bike.
    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-bikeinwoods-1-.jpg

    Beaver Sports in Fairbanks is the official Surly dealer. I got my Ogre frame from them and it came in a couple weeks. Im sure they can get me a world troller. Im in nepal bike touring for another three months.

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    I am now considering a world troller as well. I am not close to world travelling yet, given that I'm still trying to work and raise a family, but I am looking to the future. My one hang-up with the world troller, so far, is the length of the chain stay. It seems to be a little on the short side when I compare it to other bikes that I'm looking at. 419mm compared to 450 on others. Has anybody had any issues running racks and panniers with either the world troller or ordinary troller? I'm intrigued about the world troller simply because of the S&S couplers, and have other parts to build up this frame.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by cyclingexplorer View Post
    My one hang-up with the world troller, so far, is the length of the chain stay. It seems to be a little on the short side when I compare it to other bikes that I'm looking at. 419mm compared to 450 on others. Has anybody had any issues running racks and panniers with either the world troller or ordinary troller?
    I switched from a Long Haul Trucker, with nice, long chainstays to a World Troller. I am using the same rack and same equipment on the Troll as on my Trucker. I have had issues with heel strike with some setups. By adjusting my Ortleibs to sit as far back as possible, I don't experience the problem with them, but I can occasionally kick my grocery bag panniers.

    But, I'm also putting most of my tent and sleeping gear on the front, and that used to take up a whole, large pannier. So now I figure I can get by with two, small, Front-Rollers instead of my giant Back-Rollers. It's even possible that I could convert to a full, bike-packing set-up with frame bag and seat bag instead of rear panniers. So I think you will be able to make panniers work on the Troll, but my plan is to experiment with other ways to carry stuff. This bike is my commuter, and I don't see going without a rack around town, but I think it will travel lighter and pack easier if I don't need to take the rack on long trips.

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    Rob_E, I'm more of a bikepacker at the moment myself, but I will soon be changing jobs. This will involve a much longer commute, so I'm going to need more room to carry my daily requirements. Currently, work and home are close enough that I can shuttle back and forth very easily.

    I've used racks and panniers in the past and figured now may be the time to start looking at more of a touring / adventure oriented bike with the racks and panniers option. I've also looked at the Trek 929, Specialised AWOL, and, being Salsa owner already, the new Salsa Marrakesh. Everything has its advantages and disadvantages! Good thing I'm not looking to buy right now!

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    I sprung for the Surly World Troller

    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-troll-fineshed.jpgTroll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-troll-front.jpg
    My New Surly World Troller with S&S couplers. I built it up from the frame. Everything except the frame and wheels came used from ebay. XT hubs and deraileurs, tubus racks, Thompson seatpost and stem, Chris King headset, Schwalbe Mondials, Brooks B67. shimano Barend Shifters adapted to a RaceFace flatbar using Paul Thumbies, Ergon Grips....did I forget anything?

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    I got a world troller. I put on a tubus logo I got off ebay. I have size 14 feet, and it didnt clip the panniers on the maiden voyage yesterday.

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    My Troll, Ready to Roll

    Troll or World Troller Vs. ECR and other HD touring frames?-troll-good-container-2-.jpg

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    Man I had taken some time in getting back to this thread. Thanks for all the advice and awesome bike builds you guys put out here.

    Plans ended up changing a lot for me. I lived in Thailand last winter and did a a tour with my girlfriend from Thailand to northern Vietnam. I did it on a preowned Salsa Fargo.. only because it was the best deal I could find at the time and I was intrigued by the wood chipper bars. I am no longer intrigued by drop bars on my mountain bike and have now traded my Fargo for a Moonlander ops... this will be a great Alaska bike especially with our winters and beach riding.

    I learned a good bit about how I want my next touring bike to feel for long days in the saddle.. Comfortable! I am decided now that the New 2017 Troll frame is the bike for me. I have ridden a friends world troller with the jones h-loop and it is a dream fit. Plus with Surly's changes to the troll frame it sounds like a winner. I'll add in a Rohloff if I can afford it.

    I just wish surly would make the new troll frame with the S&S couplers. Apparently the still have stock of the old world troller and are undecided if the will be even making the world troller with the new frame in the future due to production costs.. (email directly from surly on that one). I guess I could still have the S&S install done at Bilenkys. But there's a bunch more dough right into the build. I guess it could pay for it self if you use the airline fees for bikes as justification.

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