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  1. #1
    dying hurts.
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    schwalbe big apple owners....

    really considering throwing some 29x2.35 big apples on my ogre...but i really don't know how this tire performs on gravel / crushed limestone trails or dirt roads (which accounts for ~30% of my riding)....
    should i stick with my exiwolf 2.3's or go big apple?!

  2. #2
    Just Ride!
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    I have the 26 version on my Big Dummy and I ride on gravel/fire roads without issues as long as I don't go nuts.

  3. #3
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    Here's a video of a Rivendell Bicycle Works employee riding off road on Big Apples. Seems like plenty of folks ride them on the dirt. They're probably super sketchy in mud but otherwise okay.

    Hunqavideo #2 - Rivendell Bicycle Works - YouTube
    All good expeditions should be simple in concept, difficult in their execution and satisfying to remember--Alastair Humphreys

  4. #4
    Monkey Junkie
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    I've ridden 29x2.35 Big Apples on everything from pavement to true MTB trails. They are very capable tires. I wouldn't recommend them for wet roots, mud or very loose off road conditions, but they are great on gravel or dirt roads. I ran mine at 20-30 psi.

  5. #5
    Fat!Drunk!Slow!
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    If you run them like a slick at high pressure, you cant push it, but if you like to ride in the 20-29psi range, they do pretty good. Love them on my Ogre!

  6. #6
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    I've used the Super Motos which are in effect a light weight version of the Big Apple. I find their limits pretty quickly when riding in the dirt. If it gets loose and you need to get out of the saddle to climb it's pretty much over. Don't get me wrong they do perform okay for how smooth the tread pattern is simply because they have such a large foot print, they have a large contact patch. I just found they were the limting factor in just how for off the beaten path I could go. Which is really what the Orgre or the Troll is about, in my opinion, adventure bikes.

    My favourtite tire has become the Kenda Small Block 8, I can't say enough good things about them. Yes they wil have more rolling resistance on pavement but when the trail turns to dirt they rock. I hate coming up on a trail and having to turn back because my eqiupment isn't suitable. An Orgre should be able to handle anything you come up on. As always your mileage may vary.

  7. #7
    dying hurts.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saddle Up View Post
    I've used the Super Motos which are in effect a light weight version of the Big Apple. I find their limits pretty quickly when riding in the dirt. If it gets loose and you need to get out of the saddle to climb it's pretty much over. Don't get me wrong they do perform okay for how smooth the tread pattern is simply because they have such a large foot print, they have a large contact patch. I just found they were the limting factor in just how for off the beaten path I could go. Which is really what the Orgre or the Troll is about, in my opinion, adventure bikes.

    My favourtite tire has become the Kenda Small Block 8, I can't say enough good things about them. Yes they wil have more rolling resistance on pavement but when the trail turns to dirt they rock. I hate coming up on a trail and having to turn back because my eqiupment isn't suitable. An Orgre should be able to handle anything you come up on. As always your mileage may vary.
    This is exactly what my thoughts were....which is why I asked....just wanted to confirm what I was thinking. My troll is all about adventure, and I don't want to limit it.
    Thanks guys.

  8. #8
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    This is why I need/have more than one Surly

    On the other hand, strip your bike of all of the gears, fancy brakes and accessories and go and ride around like you are on a big wheeled BMX bike. You won't be able to wipe the stupid grin off of your face.


  9. #9
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Dude...I'm your guy.




    I had the 2.35 BA's on the Ogre for quite a while. I put 5k on the tires, but only had the ogre for about the last 1k. I live on a pothole infested dirt road and ride the Ogre to work, which is a mix of dirt and paved roads. I also have a singletrack option, which is more than just mellow singletrack... it has switchbacks, etc., and hefty climbs along with a few rocky parts. I also have a rail trail that I ride quite a bit... fairly flat, gravely maintained surface.

    I Loved the BA's. I ran them tubeless, and they set up really easy tubeless with very little seepage.

    These tires are very predictable on loose gravel, dirt road, trail kind of conditions. They break loose sooner than a knobby, but it's very predictable...also, the sheer magnitude makes them get much better traction than you'd think for such a slick tire. What little tread they have really does quite a bit. My singletrack route involves climbing a little-used trail in the pines, so loose pine needles on the trail is normal... they did better than you'd think in this, although you have to be careful to balance your weight or you'll break loose. Wet, loose pine needles were their nemesis... pretty slippery in those conditions. But I was supremely confident in them pretty much everywhere else.

    A++ would buy again
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
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  10. #10
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    To add to the positive comments, my average speed with Conti X King 26 x 2.2 knobbies on the C&O Towpath (which is flat, straight, fairly smooth, lots of mud at times, and some loose rocks) is about 1 mph slower than the BAs 26 x 2.35.

    With the X Kings, traction in mud is much better. The BAs slip sideways in muddy ruts, where the knobbies grip. For singletrack, the BAs are out of their element, with insufficient grip for climbing, in particular. In the right conditions and terrain, the BAs excel.

  11. #11
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    big apples are just plain fun

    I have a pair of big apples that I use on my ss rigid KM. I just bought another wheelset so I can swap them out quick and easy and because I went tubeless on the offroad tires. I really love the BAs. they roll forever, and they are not bad offroad. I have done gravel roads and rail trails and they are fine. I haven't done any single track with them, but if you are riding mostly road and want to hit the woods too, they are fine.

    main reason I like them is like another poster has pointed out, they really make urban riding like bmx riding - they are super fun and they seem like they roll with very little resistance. I have the wire bead 2.35 version and am running them with tubes, so they are a little heavy. I may try to set them up tubeless.

  12. #12
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    I don't share the love for BAs. I had the 50mm version that I used on a few bikes. I found them heavy, slow, and not particularly comfortable. Glad to be rid of them. My Nano/Vulpine combo seems to roll at least as well, and is much more capable off road. For pure road work, I like my Paselas much, much more.
    Last edited by seat_boy; 09-11-2012 at 06:12 PM.
    WTB: Specialized AWOL frameset, XL

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy View Post
    For pure road work, I like my Paselas much, much more.
    Thanks for this insight. I'm debating a pair of Big Apples for commuting on my KM, but I'm concerned that they'll feel prohibitively slow. I typically ride 28-32mm Pasela / Pasela TG / T-Serv on my other bikes.

    I wish there were more options for slick 29er tires. Once you pass a 700x37 Pasela, it's on to the 700x50 Big Apple. Why no 700x42 or 700x45???

  14. #14
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    Try the Marathon Supremes for mostly road and light duty offroad.

  15. #15
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    What about the Marathon Dureme's in a 700x50? This is what I am considering to replace my Vulpines.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by keevohn View Post
    Thanks for this insight. I'm debating a pair of Big Apples for commuting on my KM, but I'm concerned that they'll feel prohibitively slow. I typically ride 28-32mm Pasela / Pasela TG / T-Serv on my other bikes.

    I wish there were more options for slick 29er tires. Once you pass a 700x37 Pasela, it's on to the 700x50 Big Apple. Why no 700x42 or 700x45???
    Quote Originally Posted by alan ss View Post
    Try the Marathon Supremes for mostly road and light duty offroad.
    +1. You are looking for Marathon Supremes. Time to cough up some cash.

  17. #17
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    fender gap

    speaking of which, anyone have suggestions on hardware I can get to fix the gap between the cascadia and the big apples on my ogres? the L bracket is too short and I don't think the zip ties are stable enough

    I'll post pics as soon as I get enough posts

  18. #18
    I Ride for Donuts
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    Quote Originally Posted by pacificBeef View Post
    speaking of which, anyone have suggestions on hardware I can get to fix the gap between the cascadia and the big apples on my ogres? the L bracket is too short and I don't think the zip ties are stable enough

    I'll post pics as soon as I get enough posts

    Here is my post in the 'surly ogre' thread when I did the cascadia fender/Big Apple thing:
    surly ogre
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  19. #19
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    oh yeah I've seen that thread but there's no mention of how people get the front fender to be almost flush against the wheel so the gap is even

  20. #20
    I Ride for Donuts
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    On the Ogre, I just tolerate it not being even. You could use any little piece of metal to lengthen the bracket on the fender though.

    On another bike, I inserted a star nut up into the steerer tube of the fork from the bottom, and then used a long bolt to connect to the fender. You could adjust fender height by threading the bolt further into the star nut to pull the fender up, or backing it off to push the fender down. Worked good.
    You have no excuse for driving to work
    (unless you don't have studded tires)
    (no excuse for that either)

  21. #21
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    I don't have an Ogre but I do have Big Apples on my Jamis Dragon. Big Apples and steel are a great combination
    He who dares....wins!

  22. #22
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    I think this thread has mostly made my decision for me. I've got a Salsa Fargo, and I'm looking for a good tire for longer rides on pavement, crushed limestone rail-to-trail, and relatively smooth dirt (it is a touring bike after all, albeit a relatively MTB-ish touring bike). I thought about going with something narrow, approaching a road tire, but the high volume of the Big Apples should provide a bit of pneumatic suspension.

  23. #23
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    2.0 BA's on my LHT


  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SocratesDiedTrolling View Post
    I think this thread has mostly made my decision for me. I've got a Salsa Fargo, and I'm looking for a good tire for longer rides on pavement, crushed limestone rail-to-trail, and relatively smooth dirt (it is a touring bike after all, albeit a relatively MTB-ish touring bike). I thought about going with something narrow, approaching a road tire, but the high volume of the Big Apples should provide a bit of pneumatic suspension.
    The BAs are perfect for those surfaces. My favorite tires on the Troll are 26x2.35 at 40 psi. Very comfortable and fast. Go up to 50 psi on pavement only.

  25. #25
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    Nice Trucker! I must say, that was a bike I considered when I was also looking at the Fargo and the Vaya. Sadly, nobody nearby had one on their shop. We do have a pretty fully stocked Salsa shop though, and I fell in love with the Fargo. The tires look nice on there too! I think they would be a good choice for me as well.

    On a different note, just curious, what headlight are you using there? I've never had a bike with drops before, and am trying to figure out what I'm gonna do for a headlight.

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