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  1. #1
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    Monkey making me nuts lately...

    So i been riding my suspended bike lately and never been riding my monkey for quiet sometime,
    Due to my recent injuries, I was thinking whether it's a good idea to put my extra 2x10 drivetrain lying around

    I like the simplicity of it as a singlespeeder but since I didn't have the power to ride it like it used to be,
    perhaps a geary setup is order to get me back into my monkey?

    decisions...decisions please...what say you???
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  2. #2
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    adding some picture from the last ride...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Monkey making me nuts lately...-photo.jpg  

    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  3. #3
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    Looks like a nice build there. I ran mine as a 1x9 for some time and liked it. No issues with front derailleur clearance and worked well for my trails.
    Enjoy the ride!

  4. #4
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    What about just adding the ten and keeping the one for simplicity? and still try and keep the front der. off?

  5. #5
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    Nice looking bike. I say go 1x9 or 10 or 8 or whatever you have laying around.
    All good expeditions should be simple in concept, difficult in their execution and satisfying to remember--Alastair Humphreys

  6. #6
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    If you have an extra geared drivetrain just laying around collecting dust... And your compatible Monkey is collecting dust because of its lack of gears...

    This is too hard, I give up.

  7. #7
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    What will drive you nuts: inserting and removing a rear wheel with a derailer and track ends, like on the Monkey. What a PITA. I have a Rawland Drakkar with this setup currently, and every time I have to reinstall the rear wheel, I think about selling it (though as a serial bike flipper, this is a pretty low bar for me). I've had a Monkey and a Troll, same thing.

  8. #8
    troll
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    Quote Originally Posted by seat_boy View Post
    What will drive you nuts: inserting and removing a rear wheel with a derailer and track ends, like on the Monkey. What a PITA. I have a Rawland Drakkar with this setup currently, and every time I have to reinstall the rear wheel, I think about selling it (though as a serial bike flipper, this is a pretty low bar for me). I've had a Monkey and a Troll, same thing.
    I don't know about the Monkey and tire clearance, but I don't have this problem on my Troll because I've set my wheel all the way forward in the track ends... no issues in getting the wheel set back right each time. I'm running a 1x10 drivetrain, and super fat tires...

  9. #9
    Monkey Junkie
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    I've been loving the gears on my monkey. 3x9 with no complaints. Rear wheel removal is a pain with the Der and track ends, but I rarely have to deal with it.

  10. #10
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    I just put an SLX RD with a 11-36 10 speed cassette and an MRP chain guide on my Monkey. It climbs wonderfully and is easy to deal with. If removing your rear wheel is incredibly difficult, that's user error. It's only slightly more complex than using a standard dropout.

  11. #11
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    Thank a lot Guys,
    I feel better now,
    the 1x10 setup interests me,
    I think the wheel removal is not a big deal though,
    Just need some learning curve that needs to be flatten out
    When trails gets tougher, Just stand up and deliver.

  12. #12
    Unhinged Aussie on a 29er
    Reputation: hunter006's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mack_turtle View Post
    I just put an SLX RD with a 11-36 10 speed cassette and an MRP chain guide on my Monkey. It climbs wonderfully and is easy to deal with. If removing your rear wheel is incredibly difficult, that's user error. It's only slightly more complex than using a standard dropout.
    I'm not sure that I agree with that entirely. I've taken my bike to a bunch of mechanics in the past year, and only a handful of them have been able to remove it easily with a rear der mounted. Most end up completely unscrewing the QR skewer. I usually end up showing them how I pull the chain off, even places that are Surly specific dealers*. There's definitely a learning curve, but if even Surly dealers are having issues with it - with good mechanics, not just some wanker behind the counter - then it's not as straightforward or intuitive as it could be. I asked them why that was the case once, and they said they never had to pull the wheel off once the chain was on, which makes sense - they build it up and one of the last things they do is put the chain on.

    * as opposed to someone with a QBP account but does not stock Surly bikes in store.

  13. #13
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    Most TT bikes have similar rearward-facing dropouts, although those have shorter slots. I deal with those all day. If you can tie your own shoes, it should not be a problem. It's easier if you pull the QR skewer completely out, but it's still easy. Maybe it's fair to question the abilities of the "wanker behind the counter" if it's that much of a challenge for him.

    Here's a tip- drop the chain off the front chainring. This will let a few inches of chain slack, making it easier to wrangle the chain off the cassette.

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