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  1. #1
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    Where would you drill the exit port for a Rockshox Reverb Stealth hose?

    I am in the planning stage for a simple modification to my 2011 Specialized SX. For those that don't know, and to make this thread relevant to a greater number of users, the SX is very similar to the popular SX Trail (left), shown below.


    Here is a diagram of my 2011 Spez SX size Long, with relevant measurements.


    Design criteria:
    I want to drill a single hole in either the seat tube or the down tube large enough to let out the hydraulic line for a Reverb Stealth, with a small amount of free space for a thin grommet or coating or tape to prevent the hole edges wearing against the line.

    I would prefer an exit toward the front of the frame to avoid routing under the BB, but that is a minor preference--especially because Spez specs the cable routing for front derailer, rear derailer, and rear brake under the BB in stock form, so I could live w/ it. Currently the bike is cabled with no FD and the RD and rear brake are run above the down tube.

    I may not have access to the proper tool to cut a hole from a restricted space, like X2 in the figure above.

    I want to place the hole (to the degree possible without help from a Spez engineer with a computer model of the frame) in the place least likely to harm frame strength. X3 and X4 are locations of existing holes, perprendicular to the frame, which could be widened. But that raises the question of what the minimum bend radius of the hydraulic line will be, to see how it projects down toward the wheel before bending back up along the frame.

    Drilling at an angle not perpendicular to the tube wall would give a better hose exit angle, but may be harder to accomplish or remove more material.

    Please reply with your advice. I will continue the thread with the finished product when it all comes together. Thanks!

  2. #2
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    I'm sure most would agree (especially Spec) that you should not drill your frame anywhere, with that said, I must ask why you'd run a dropper post on that bike anyway? Will you even be pedaling it much?

  3. #3
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    Disclaimer aside. I believe your best bet (even thuogh you don't want to) is on the back side of the seat tube just above the linkage pivot. All the points you listed could end up kinking the hose. From the looks of it, there is a bend above the linkage that could give you a more "natural" entry point. Thats assuming you can drill "up" rather than "in" if you know what I mean.
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  4. #4
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    Why not drill the hole near the SX decal by the headtube? On frames designed for dropper posts, this is where the hole goes and I imagine this is about the strongest part of the frame.

    On a side note, Why do you run the RD cable and hose above the downtube?? For those cables to get cut or severely damaged on the bottom, would require a force greater than the frame can withstand. No one has real or consistent problems with that under downtube routing, plus with above routing you have increased the spots where cable rub occurs.
    .

  5. #5
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    This thread has virtually nothing to do w/ Specialized. I originally posted it to Frame-building with the rationale that this modification is very much like retrofitting water bottle bosses onto a frame that lacks them. But a moderator moved it to here. Sorry to waste anyone's time.

    I'll choose to interpret any skepticsim not as implication that I have no idea what my own bike is good for, but as pure, good-natured curiosity instead. So, for the good-naturedly curious:

    The 4" travel SX is nearly the enduro/all-mountain ideal that has emerged in the last few years, without even the manufacturer or their marketers meaning it to be. With a beefy, 5 inch travel fork and the rear set up highly progressively, you get bottomless suspension that moves freely through the initial stroke. Less travel (than the Spez Enduro or a host of other 160 mm bikes) means less wallowing in the midstroke, and firmer terrain pumping--I'll cite Lee McCormack here. A 35 mm or 36 mm stanchion fork lowered to 120ish is wonderfully sturdy, and w/ a slighly more linear spring curve, balances w/ the 4" rear. This bike is not subject to the same "make it AM, but make sure it comes out under 7 lbs or no one will buy it" constraint that many enduro bikes are designed under. I am giving up a pound or even two to some race-bred AM bikes, but who cares? This frame can go big. A nice thing to say about a mountain bike that too often gets lost in the endless weight weenie arms race. And it's not a 7" freeride bike I want to pretend is AM but will always be a pig--it's a dual slalom bike, meant for gated racing (though gated racing as it exists today has made rear suspension almost obselete; the gate is too important, the courses aren't that rough, and hardtails usually rule. Anyway...) It pedals well. It sprints OK, it jumps well, it corners great (BB height is only a like 12.5"!!), head angle is an AM-approved 67ish degrees. Most importantly, I already own, trail-ride, and race this frame. It may not be for you, but, interrupted seat tube aside, it works for me.


    @try2kpup I think you are in the right. Drilling out one cable anchor boss appeals to me because I think I'm not introducing a new stress on the frame, just removing little more than the threads from where an M4 bolt would go. But the cable would very probably poke out a couple cm before bending back toward the frame. Snag hazard, and not a very clean routing.
    Last edited by Snfoilhat; 12-16-2012 at 04:25 PM.

  6. #6
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    How about fabricating some sort of brake line banjo fitting with a hollow bolt for the outside of the downtube? The trick would be routing the hose on the inside then...

    some fitting ideas Goodridge

  7. #7
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    Depending on what is inside the lower linkage pivot, what about entering the frame at X4 and routing the housing through the linkage brace that connects the seattube to the downtube? That should provide a smooth, kink free routing and use an existing hole. The key thing is figuring out if there is room to route the housing around the pivot.

  8. #8
    pvd
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    Top of downtube, on the side, just behind the head tube. The side depends on wether you like right or left control. Finish with a shimano Di2 grommet. Simple. Not through the head tube as the routing isn't as good.

    It is always better to cut and hack than to not (assuming you think a little). Plenty of people will say not to but the have never learned anything from experience. Go for it!

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  9. #9
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    Have a look at the alloy cable guides Spcialized use on the Venge road bike for internal routing. These could easily be adapted for what you want to do by drilling them out enough to pass the complete cable housing. They enter the frame on a very acute angle.

    Furthermore, it is likely your shop has plenty of spares lying around because the frame is supplied with guides for both mechanical and Di2 cabling and they will only use one or the other depending on how the bike is built.

    Then I'd put your hole in the side of the top tube or the down tube, just like the Venge.

  10. #10
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    have you looked to see if you can exit out the bottom of the bottom bracket, I think you would just need to enlarge the drain hole slightly. So long as you run the plastic sleeve around the crank spindle you should be ok.....I think. Thats what I was planning on doing on my SXT.

  11. #11
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  12. #12
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    New question here. Reverb Stealth on Enduro 2013

    Hi, has everyone install a Reverb Stealth on an Enduro 2013 ?
    I saw some photos about Kurtis Keene's Enduro with the Stealth and in some article he says he has one.

    Thanks in advance

  13. #13
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    on a 2013 there are holes for hoses to route in and out of the top tube, I dont have one but my guess is the reverb hose could just be left in from the bottom of the post to the exit near the headtube.
    Might be an arse to fit but once its in, its in.

    EDIT: In here, and just run through to bottom of post?


  14. #14
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    I want to do the same thing on a Yeti Alloy 2009 frame. My intention is to drill progressively larger holes with a Dremel, at location X2 but slightly offset to the left (it may be impossible to drill in the midline). I thought of drilling the hole not perpendicular to the axis of the tube, but rather at 45 so to avoid bending the hose.

    I am planning to do the job next weekend, but I would be grateful for any advice before I lay hand on the frame!

  15. #15
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    i was pondering this sort of routing for my pitch, instead i had a longer hose fitted to my normal external reverb and routed it down the downtube using the cable holders and under the bb then back up inbetween the tyre and the swing arm with a bt of rubber outer tube over it at that point
    it worked very well and saved any frame stress issues

  16. #16
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    I did it! I went through my usual ride this morning () and the frame didn't fall apart yet. I made a little scratch in the paint though - does anybody know which RAL color code the Yeti Alloy ASR5 2009 has? I'd like to restore the paint (although the bike has lots of scratches anyway...)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Where would you drill the exit port for a Rockshox Reverb Stealth hose?-2013-01-26-11.32.53-copy.jpg  


  17. #17
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    ps: note the studded snow tires!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by robertobrunetti View Post
    Hi, has everyone install a Reverb Stealth on an Enduro 2013 ?
    I saw some photos about Kurtis Keene's Enduro with the Stealth and in some article he says he has one.

    Thanks in advance
    I also think about the hose passage for use an Reverb Stealth, I can be use the M5 threading on the bottom hose guide (It will be just necessary to sand down the metal threading for use with a 5mm-5.5mm RS Reverb hose)

    Eric

    P.S : Excuse me for my awful english...I'm French







    'Tentense...or Intenseman

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