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  1. #1
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    Wheel upgrade Stumpjumper Comp 29er.

    Looking to possibly upgrade the wheels on my Stumpjumer Comp 29er HT. I virtually customized these, but not knowing the specs on the stock wheels I'm not sure this is an upgrade.

    Sun Inferno 23 29er Custom
    Front Hub: Pure XCR Convertible Black 15mmTA
    Rear Hub: Pure XCR Black QR
    Spokes: Sapim Race Black
    Nipple Color: Brass
    Rim Tape: Stans Tape/Valves Installed

    I'm finding that tubless may not be possible with this rim, but I'm not sold on that anyway.

    Any info you guys have is appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Well... at a glance, your post raises a few questions. What's your goal? Weight savings? Increased strength? Color matching? What year is your Stumpy Comp HT (in other words, what are the stock wheels? You don't necessarily need the specs, just the labels off the parts.)? What do you weigh and what kind of riding do you do? And what price did your customized/proposed wheelset come out to be? Any reasonable guestimate on weight?

    I've got a 2011 Stumpy Comp HT and would kill for a new wheelset, so I'm certainly interested in people's thoughts and impressions. My wheels are the stock DTSwiss X450SL's with Spec'd HiLo hubs. I'm not convinced on tubeless, either. I'm about 195 pounds and ride trails/XC with a desire to do a little casual racing this year.
    2004 Specialized FSR Pro
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpringsRubicon View Post
    Well... at a glance, your post raises a few questions. What's your goal? Weight savings? Increased strength? Color matching? What year is your Stumpy Comp HT (in other words, what are the stock wheels? You don't necessarily need the specs, just the labels off the parts.)? What do you weigh and what kind of riding do you do? And what price did your customized/proposed wheelset come out to be? Any reasonable guestimate on weight?

    I've got a 2011 Stumpy Comp HT and would kill for a new wheelset, so I'm certainly interested in people's thoughts and impressions. My wheels are the stock DTSwiss X450SL's with Spec'd HiLo hubs. I'm not convinced on tubeless, either. I'm about 195 pounds and ride trails/XC with a desire to do a little casual racing this year.
    Wow, guess I did kinda rush that. Year is a 2012 with the stock wheelset, same as you I believe. I'd like to reduce the weight of my wheels, I'm not too concerned about strength, I mean I don't want them to be super weak or anything, but I'm only 160lbs. I ride XC almost exclusively, nothing too crazy. What I mean by stock specs is what is the stock weight of the wheels currently? The price of the wheels I spec'ed out is around $300 at Bicycle wheel warehouse. I estimate the total weight of them to be just under 2000 grams.

  4. #4
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    That doesn't sound like you'd be saving anything weight-wise then. If you're going lightweight check out the Stan's crest rims. Or if you want a built-up set, have a look at the American Classic standard or even their race version. A bit pricier than what you've quoted above, but that's what you'll need to spend to get a significant weight saving.

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    Quote Originally Posted by midbunchlurker View Post
    That doesn't sound like you'd be saving anything weight-wise then. If you're going lightweight check out the Stan's crest rims. Or if you want a built-up set, have a look at the American Classic standard or even their race version. A bit pricier than what you've quoted above, but that's what you'll need to spend to get a significant weight saving.
    I found Stan's for $600, around 1650 grams, There's a set at Nashbar for $289 that are 1850 grams. What I'd like to know is what the stock wheels weigh, how weight am I reducing with an upgrade. Is the extra 200 grams worth another $300?
    Cole 29er Lite Mountain Wheelset - Sweet Deals on these Sweet Wheels

  6. #6
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    I would strongly recommend looking at the Roval Control wheelset from Specy - ~$700, nice and light (1680g I believe), strong, been running them on my Stumpy for 6 mos. Tubeless ready out of the box. The r. hub will accept the feehub to alloy you to run SRAMs XX1 as well. Convertible to all the various axle configs. What's not too like?
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  7. #7
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    I'm a recent convert to tubeless. So far with about 150 miles on them, I love them. I can run lower tire pressures when I want to. I rode at just under 30 psi and it made for a very comfortable ride. I don't get flats on the same trails (little thorns that would get embedded in the tire and take forever to find all of them). They also save 3/4# across two wheels. That's all rotational weight out past the rim, so that's a lot of inertia.

    Converting a set of tubeless ready wheels/tires cost $35 when I took delivery of the bike.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by mavtek View Post
    What I mean by stock specs is what is the stock weight of the wheels currently?
    Those wheels come in at 1030gr front and 1200gr rear. Just weighed my set that I took off when I put on crests. That weight is with the skewer/thru skewer and the red tape.
    Stay aware of those who hide in plain sight.

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    The Sun inferno rims have been problematic for tubless, and I don't think they are really an upgrade from your current set-up.

    Its hard to say whats worth it. I upgraded from the stock Sun Ringle Inferno rims on my Cannondale flash to a set of Stans Crests. I also upgraded from a stock Low end Sram cassette to a Shimano XT. The Wheel upgrade with the cassette cost around 700 and the bike is 1.5 lbs lighter. The lighter wheels make a difference you can feel but its not going to suddenly have you dropping people who currently put the hurt on you. I did the upgrade because I wanted to run tubeless
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpringsRubicon View Post
    Well... at a glance, your post raises a few questions. What's your goal? Weight savings? Increased strength? Color matching? What year is your Stumpy Comp HT (in other words, what are the stock wheels? You don't necessarily need the specs, just the labels off the parts.)? What do you weigh and what kind of riding do you do? And what price did your customized/proposed wheelset come out to be? Any reasonable guestimate on weight?

    I've got a 2011 Stumpy Comp HT and would kill for a new wheelset, so I'm certainly interested in people's thoughts and impressions. My wheels are the stock DTSwiss X450SL's with Spec'd HiLo hubs. I'm not convinced on tubeless, either. I'm about 195 pounds and ride trails/XC with a desire to do a little casual racing this year.
    What would convince you of ditching your tubes?
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    What would convince you of ditching your tubes?
    LOL you sound like the bike shop owner I was discussing this with a few weeks ago. Honestly, I fail to see how tubes are "broke" so I'm hesitant to fix a problem I don't believe I have. I'm concerned about a couple of things. I have 3 bikes and not a lot of time to ride. It's my understanding that tubeless setups slowly lose air if not regularly used ("slowly" being a matter of a week or two) and therefore need more attention. Especially if a bike sits for a month or so (which happens as my enthusiasm shifts between the SS, the HT and the full-squish). I don't have a compressor, I have three different wheelsets. Honestly, I don't know that I have a good reason not to try it... I'll probably end up giving it a shot sometime this spring. I need to do some research.

    Convince me. (or not, as we shouldn't hijack the thread!)
    2004 Specialized FSR Pro
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  12. #12
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    Tubes can lose up to 1# daily. So in a month, most MTB tires will be flat from non-use. How long does it take to top up tires with a standard bike pump? Heck, I use the bike pump to top off motorcycle tires and even car tires because it is easier to grab than the compressor.

    You said you are trying to lose weight on the wheelset. Tubeless tires will save about 1# - 1.5# on the bike for very little money ($30 - $80). Look at the grams / $ of that compared to buying a whole new wheelset.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpringsRubicon View Post
    LOL you sound like the bike shop owner I was discussing this with a few weeks ago. Honestly, I fail to see how tubes are "broke" so I'm hesitant to fix a problem I don't believe I have. I'm concerned about a couple of things. I have 3 bikes and not a lot of time to ride. It's my understanding that tubeless setups slowly lose air if not regularly used ("slowly" being a matter of a week or two) and therefore need more attention. Especially if a bike sits for a month or so (which happens as my enthusiasm shifts between the SS, the HT and the full-squish). I don't have a compressor, I have three different wheelsets. Honestly, I don't know that I have a good reason not to try it... I'll probably end up giving it a shot sometime this spring. I need to do some research.

    Convince me. (or not, as we shouldn't hijack the thread!)
    First, IF you are running TLR (tubeless ready) rims and tires, this is a simple process. Air loss does happen, more after initial setup, less later on. Its no different than tubes, you just inflate with a floor pump..no need for a compressor. As to set up, yes, a compressor can be helpful, but often not necessary (again, with TLR rims/tires). Tubeless almost guarantees no flats or at least greatly reduces the risks. Tubeless will allow you to run lower pressures and maintain flat protection against pinch flats. Tubeless will shed *some* weight...but this isn't the main reason to do it. In closing, I love tubeless, it changed my life (ok...maybe not...but I do think its the way to go)
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post
    Tubes can lose up to 1# daily. So in a month, most MTB tires will be flat from non-use. How long does it take to top up tires with a standard bike pump? Heck, I use the bike pump to top off motorcycle tires and even car tires because it is easier to grab than the compressor.

    You said you are trying to lose weight on the wheelset. Tubeless tires will save about 1# - 1.5# on the bike for very little money ($30 - $80). Look at the grams / $ of that compared to buying a whole new wheelset.
    Where are you getting your weight loss values? TLR tires aren't any lighter than normal tires. Going tubeless will shed some weight from the loss of the tube, but remember, you are adding ~60g of sealant to each tire so its not the full weight of the tube you loose. If you do a ghetto conversion, the weight loss is even less b/c you have the tube-like rim strip in there too (although it is lighter than a regular tube).
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  15. #15
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    Just to add my $0.02, I was not interested in going tubeless either. I was having issues with goat heads and bought the thick goo filled tubs and had liners installed. $11.5 per tube and $22.00 for the liners. They worked great and I spent about 900 miles on them. Well I got the bug to drop some weight but was cash light. I spent my money buying my son a leftover new 2012 RH Comp. Nevertheless, I dropped another $31 to loose the tubes and liners. I ended up dropping almost 4.2 lbs off my bike. My wheels were (f) 6lbs 8 oz and (r) 7lbs 10 oz with the tubes and liners. I dropped about 1K grams off each tire. These are the stock Alex built with Spec GC's at 2.1". I can not tell you what a difference going tubeless makes. My bike is much quicker and feels like a new ride. I am a heavy guy near 300lbs and 6'4". I have been tubeless for a 200 or so miles and no issues on loosing pressure and no regrets. Since the bike came "2 Bliss" ready I see no reason not to loose the tubes.

    Mark
    2012 XXL Carve Expert

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    First, IF you are running TLR (tubeless ready) rims and tires, this is a simple process. Air loss does happen, more after initial setup, less later on. Its no different than tubes, you just inflate with a floor pump..no need for a compressor. As to set up, yes, a compressor can be helpful, but often not necessary (again, with TLR rims/tires). Tubeless almost guarantees no flats or at least greatly reduces the risks. Tubeless will allow you to run lower pressures and maintain flat protection against pinch flats. Tubeless will shed *some* weight...but this isn't the main reason to do it. In closing, I love tubeless, it changed my life (ok...maybe not...but I do think its the way to go)
    And this is part of where I get frustrated. There seems to be a bunch of different approaches... "yes, you need a compressor." "No, you don't need a compressor." "You might need a compressor, it depends on the wheels and tires you use, as well as the current alignment of the planets."

    I need to do some homework, really. I tend to (happily) run Specialized tires and I've got three different wheelsets among my bikes. As I currently understand it, some tires and some wheels work well and/or differently together, so my mileage could vary among the bikes... is that right?

    As for the OP, I'm sorry the thread is hijacked. I will say that for my 26" bike I bought a set of the stock Stan's rims/hubs and I really like them and they made a major difference. Granted, that's for a totally different bike, but still - good product.
    2004 Specialized FSR Pro
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpringsRubicon View Post
    And this is part of where I get frustrated. There seems to be a bunch of different approaches... "yes, you need a compressor." "No, you don't need a compressor." "You might need a compressor, it depends on the wheels and tires you use, as well as the current alignment of the planets."

    I need to do some homework, really. I tend to (happily) run Specialized tires and I've got three different wheelsets among my bikes. As I currently understand it, some tires and some wheels work well and/or differently together, so my mileage could vary among the bikes... is that right?

    As for the OP, I'm sorry the thread is hijacked. I will say that for my 26" bike I bought a set of the stock Stan's rims/hubs and I really like them and they made a major difference. Granted, that's for a totally different bike, but still - good product.
    Its just the reality of tubeless. Think about what you are trying to do - inflate a tire that is sitting, sometimes, loosely on the rim. The more loose the fit, the more high volume air you will need to get the tire to seat. Most of mine have gone with just a floor pump. I run Specy tires and they work GREAT. The thing about tubeless is though, once they are set up, its pretty much set it and forget it (except for just the normal pumping up to maintain pressure..same as with tubes). Also, once those beads are sealed and set, even if it goes completely flat, you will still be able to inflate with a floor pump. Its just the initial set-up that can be tricky.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

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  18. #18
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    You cannot say you will not need a compressor. In fact you probably will. I use Spechy tires on Roval rims and though they are great I had to use a compressor on some of my tire changes as well as stans cleanup, refills and remounts. Good news is that a compressor has many more functions that prove it a good tool to have besides just tubless tire mounting and they are pretty reasonable in price now-a-days. Going tubless is the single greatest thing I have ever done to any of my bikes, period!
    Last edited by tsefreeflow; 02-18-2013 at 10:13 AM.
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  19. #19
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    On my stumpy I have Roval wheels and trailking tires and I popped the bead when riding at 18psi. I was able to reseat the tire with a compact hand pump. I was amazing. Witht the same wheels though I had to use a compressor to get another brand of tires to bead, so it really does depend on a lot of different factors.
    2013 Stumpy Evo
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  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    Where are you getting your weight loss values? TLR tires aren't any lighter than normal tires. Going tubeless will shed some weight from the loss of the tube, but remember, you are adding ~60g of sealant to each tire so its not the full weight of the tube you loose. If you do a ghetto conversion, the weight loss is even less b/c you have the tube-like rim strip in there too (although it is lighter than a regular tube).
    BAAH! Stupid memory.

    Tube vs.Tubeless Weight Analysis

    1/2 pounds weight loss between both wheels. Not 1.5 pounds.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gregon2wheels View Post
    BAAH! Stupid memory.

    Tube vs.Tubeless Weight Analysis

    1/2 pounds weight loss between both wheels. Not 1.5 pounds.
    That sounds more like it!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TiGeo View Post
    That sounds more like it!
    Still a good investment gm / $.

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