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  1. #1
    I ride a Swarf
    Reputation: Stuart B's Avatar
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    what fork travel do you run on the fsr 120?

    as the title says. Just making sure I am choosing the right fork before i order frame and fork.

    The fork I am looking at is 130mm with a lock down function (Its a Pace RC41xcam), The ox TALAS RLC is more expensive, but has travel adjust.

    The lock down facility is more on trail friendly though. But will 130mm all the time exept locked down make it feel too stable and choperish? What are you opinions?

    Stu
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

  2. #2
    Nothing here
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    I run my Minute at 130mm. It handles just fine and I ride really twisty singletrack. I tried it in 120mm as well, but it feels a little twitchier.

  3. #3
    Bikeaddict
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    Depends

    I run TALAS at 110 for fast single track and 120 for the meatier stuff. 130 makes it feel slow ... for me

  4. #4
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    I run a Talas RLC fully compressed 90mm when climbing, 130 when bombing downhill.

    I don't spend a lot (or any) time in between. Fork feels awesome!

  5. #5
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    Go w/ a Talas

    The talas adjustability gives you the versatility of having a climber and a downhill, aggressive trial bike all in one...

  6. #6
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    I'm running the Blacks on my 120 Comp. At 130, I find the front end lifts too easily when climbing steep singletrack, so I normally wind mine down to 100. However it's back up to 130 for any gnarly downhill stuff.

  7. #7
    I ride a Swarf
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    thanks for your replies fellas.

    I decided to get the Pace forks in the end. The reason being i think the lock down type feature is more trail friendly and quickest to use, even though adjustable travel is a very nice idea.

    I have Pace forks on my current frame, and have only had to deal with Pace customer services once in 4 years ( a few months back) and it was a delight.

    The pace rc41s' are getting as good reviews as the fox over here (UK) in the mags, and being from the UK I like to have at least one British component on my bike.

    I'll post some piccies up of it whens its built.

    Stu
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart B
    thanks for your replies fellas.

    I decided to get the Pace forks in the end. The reason being i think the lock down type feature is more trail friendly and quickest to use, even though adjustable travel is a very nice idea.

    I have Pace forks on my current frame, and have only had to deal with Pace customer services once in 4 years ( a few months back) and it was a delight.

    The pace rc41s' are getting as good reviews as the fox over here (UK) in the mags, and being from the UK I like to have at least one British component on my bike.

    I'll post some piccies up of it whens its built.

    Stu
    Hey Stu!

    What's a 'lock down' feature? You mean 'lock-out'? The Talas has lock-out.

    Pedro

  9. #9
    I ride a Swarf
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pedro2005
    Hey Stu!

    What's a 'lock down' feature? You mean 'lock-out'? The Talas has lock-out.

    Pedro
    Hi Pedro

    Its basically liek Marzocci ETA, you hit a button then load up the fork to go down its travel and it stays down. it then has a small amount of movement. This keeps the nose down for climbing. When you hit a big enough bump or pull the button up again it opos back up to normal. Admitagly you don't get get the suspension monement as with thravel adjust, but is quick and can be applied with out stopping ot slowing too much as the trail demands.

    Stu.
    Last edited by Stuart B; 07-04-2005 at 11:10 PM.
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart B
    Hi Pedro

    Its basically liek Marzocci ETA, you hit a button then load up the fork to go down its travel and it stays down. it then has a small amount of movement. This keeps the nose down for climbing. When you hit a big enough bump or pull the button up again it opos back up to normal. Admitagly you don't get get the suspension monement as with thravel adjust, but is quick and can be applied with out stopping ot slowing too much as the trail demands.

    Stu.
    I see...

    That's cool.

    Thanks,

    Pedro

  11. #11
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    I've fitted Pace RC40s to my Enduro and love 'em to bits. They did have to go back to sort a warranty problem but are now running sweetly.

    They have a feature which drops the front end down until triggered by sufficient force to raise the front end up again, a feature I've made considerable use of. There's also a travel adjust dial to set the ride height to the optimum level. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to anyone.

  12. #12
    dead sailor
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    ... and if we just ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart B
    as the title says. Just making sure I am choosing the right fork before i order frame and fork.

    The fork I am looking at is 130mm with a lock down function (Its a Pace RC41xcam), The ox TALAS RLC is more expensive, but has travel adjust.

    The lock down facility is more on trail friendly though. But will 130mm all the time exept locked down make it feel too stable and choperish? What are you opinions?

    Stu
    I run a 7" Marzocchi 66RC on mine. yea, the tall-ness of the fork does rake it up a bit, but the 7" of plush Zoke travel lets me do really technical climbs and downhills with out breaking a sweat.
    phuck it!

    p.s. I NEED a Pugsley

  13. #13
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    I ride a Stumpy 120 Expert

    My Talas fork is wide open on the downs and wide open on the ups. The trails I ride don't require me to shorten the travel, I just pedal hard case into everything and let the fork do it's job.
    "Failing to fetch me at first keep encouraged, missing me one place search another, I stop somewhere waiting for you." W. W.

  14. #14
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    No good Read the manual...

    Quote Originally Posted by PickledFish
    I run a 7" Marzocchi 66RC on mine. yea, the tall-ness of the fork does rake it up a bit, but the 7" of plush Zoke travel lets me do really technical climbs and downhills with out breaking a sweat.
    You haven't read your manual. Spec. is pretty clear about _NOT_ running any fork longer than 130 mm on the SJ120 (from the PDF of the manual I have for my S-Works:

    Stumpjumper FSR 120: This frame is compatible ONLY with single crown forks that have 4.75� (130mm) or less. Use of different styled forks or forks with longer travel may result catastrophic failure of the frame which may result in serious personal injury or death.

    You might be voiding the warranty or risking your neck if you're really using a 7" fork to it's capacity.

    good luck

  15. #15
    Gravity Rides Everything
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    my talas spends most of it's time in 130 mode. I do crank it down to 120 or so for more technical singletrack, and 100 or even 90 for real steep hills. I think the bike would be fine with a 130 mm fork though honestly. I was very paranoid about making my head angle too slack coming from a 100 mm fork on an enduro (why was that ever specced like that in 2003!?) but the 130 setup works great.

  16. #16
    I ride a Swarf
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    Thanks guys, you have eased my concerns.

    The shop said it shuold be here yesterday, but phoned yesterday to say it will be tuesday now ( hehe. Was hoping to have it built over the weekend ready for a ride with some colleages on monday for its shakedown. I have a 100km endurance next weekend......baptism of fire and asking for trouble....but if it does turn up teusday...i won't be able to resist lol. ANy later though and I'll have to keep my Trek 8000 together.

    Stu
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

  17. #17
    dead sailor
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    Quote Originally Posted by punga
    You haven't read your manual. Spec. is pretty clear about _NOT_ running any fork longer than 130 mm on the SJ120 (from the PDF of the manual I have for my S-Works:

    Stumpjumper FSR 120: This frame is compatible ONLY with single crown forks that have 4.75� (130mm) or less. Use of different styled forks or forks with longer travel may result catastrophic failure of the frame which may result in serious personal injury or death.

    You might be voiding the warranty or risking your neck if you're really using a 7" fork to it's capacity.

    good luck
    no its cool. I got a TIG welder and just welded on some additional gussets to the head tube.I'm golden.

    actually... no, i was just kidding. I thought that was obvious
    phuck it!

    p.s. I NEED a Pugsley

  18. #18
    RFKA Coldsnap
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    For future reference, it's generally figured that one inch (25mm) of travel decreases the headangle by 1 degree. It's just a rule of thumb, a fast and hard estimate, because we all know Marzocchi makes forks with ridiculously high axle-to-crown heights compared to others.

    And you can always quicken the steering by shortening your stem a bit. Shorter stem, smaller arc around the steering tube, less movement distance to create the same amount of steering angle.

    Now go forth and kill thy selves!!
    [SIZE=1]EXTREEM MEDIUM MOUNTAINSTYLE SLOPCROSS STEEDS:
    '06 Iron Horse 7Point3 w/888RC + Roco
    '05 Specialized Rockhopper Pro Disc FR-Pimped
    '92 Specialized HardRock Pink-Retro-XC-Pimped[/SIZE]

  19. #19
    I ride a Swarf
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    I have been thinking about that. My current bike is a trek 8000 which came with a 80mm fork, but i fitted a 100mm Pace fork. Using your rule of thumb its head angle changed form 71 to nearer 70.

    The spesh HA is 70.5. Is that with the fork at 130mm? If so the steering should feel faster than I am used to any way.

    (I can't wait for it to turn up! hehe)

    Stu
    What exactly is a rigid hard tail?

  20. #20
    RFKA Coldsnap
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    The quoted angles are usually for the "standard" length of fork. So depending on the model, if you were to look at a SJ 120 and they usually ship with a 100mm fork more than likely the angle they quote will be measured with the 100mm fork they usually ship with (example off top of my head, I don't know if 100mm is correct).

    My RH Pro Disc shipped with 130mm and a 69.5* HA, and with the sag correctly dialled in (1.5 inch) it steers pretty quick. Not nearly as quick as my 1993 Spesh with a 40mm Rock Shox fork and a 73* HA but hey that thing was dangerous without a 130mm stem. So I'm sorta re-teaching myself how to ride after years of that.

    Seems stupid but something that I've found to work.... For faster steering you can do two things... Preload your shock by pressing down on it before a corner effectively dropping the front, increasing the HA, and quickening the steering. Or alternatively I've found that when coming from a quick steering XC bike to a slower steering AM/FR setup leaning the bike into the corner means you have to steer a tad less to get it to carve. Both take some practice.

    Wide bars messed up my skills too. I don't think my new bike could be setup any more differently than my old XC bike. Heh!
    [SIZE=1]EXTREEM MEDIUM MOUNTAINSTYLE SLOPCROSS STEEDS:
    '06 Iron Horse 7Point3 w/888RC + Roco
    '05 Specialized Rockhopper Pro Disc FR-Pimped
    '92 Specialized HardRock Pink-Retro-XC-Pimped[/SIZE]

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