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  1. #1
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    Warranties Rule!!

    I was having all kinds of little problems with both my fork and my shock on my 2007 SL Comp.

    The fork was not sufficiently dampening rebound, resulting in a loose-feeling rattley top out. There was also about a quarter inch of unrestrained travel when lifting the front wheel off of the ground, not laterally or fore and aft, but "play" within the stroke itself. Not really a huge issue, but it was getting progressively more pronounced with use.

    The shock was also having rebound problems, requiring me to set the rebound dampening nearly off in order to get the shock to rebound at all. The last 3 settings toward full dampening resulted in a stuck down situation in which it would only return by reducing dampening. This was not happening a month ago. On the trail, it felt like the shock was getting packed down further with each bump resulting in the rear feeling like a hardtail, but unstable. It was also beginning to leak more oil than it had been previously.

    While the fork issue was of some concern, it was the shock that really got me into the shop.

    My shop manager called Specialized on a Monday (thanks Steve), and by Friday they had sent a new shock and left leg cartridge (the side with the spike valve).

    It only took the mech about a half hour total to swap the cartridge and shock, inflate the spike valve chamber to 70 psi, and set the shock pressure.

    I noticed the difference right away. It feels better than it did when it was new. There is absoultely zero play in the fork, and the shock feels solid and smooth. It really feels like a new bike.

    I wish I had thought to check the spike valve pressure prior to the cartridge being removed in order to see if it was in the proper range, but I guess I can play around with that later.

    Sorry to not offer a more technical analysis of the symptoms/post surgery performance, but I'm still in the process of learning what all of this stuff means.

    I couldn't be more stoked with Specialized's willingness to take care of their customers, but can't help being a little worried about after my year is up. What are my options after that point, just foot the bill for new parts, or are shops beginning to work on these things?

  2. #2
    Wil109
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    My sentiments exactly E Bob, I'm beginning to notice issues with both the fork and the shock (shock has already been repaired once) and considering the options for replacement at the end of the warranty period. Glad you got yours sorted, I'm looking at a DHX 5.0 air or RP23 float for the rear and a talas 36 RC2 for the front, well over 1200 to get it all, eeeeekkkk!!! One thing at a time I think.
    [SIZE=1]I love my bike and my bike loves me[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    "My shop manager called Specialized on a Monday (thanks Steve), and by Friday they had sent a new shock and left leg cartridge (the side with the spike valve)."

    The right side of the fork (the damper cartridge - blue top cap) is actually the side that has the spike valve in it and is where you control your nitrogen level. The left side (air cartridge - black top cap) is for air pressure and travel adjust.

  4. #4
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    Wow, you're absolutely right. Thanks for that, I feel like a tool.

    That means I'm only running 70PSI in the chamber where I'm supposed to be running 104-108 for proper sag.

    I've only ridden around in circles in the parking lot so far, but the fork feels more plush than it had previously. Could this be attributed to sitting further into the travel?

  5. #5
    Now with More Wood
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    The spike valve schraeder is the one with the 6-sided nut on it - it requires a wrench to remove. The air spring schraeder is accesible via a "regular" cap - which can usually be twisted off by hand.

    If you were only running 70 psi in the main air spring chamber, the fork would defintely feel plush...but it would also sit halfway down its travel (since you should normally be running 104psi for your weight). In my experience, at the correct pressure, this fork does not feel very plush, it is actually quite harsh over small bumps - it only feels like a smooth long travel fork when you hit it hard enough to open the spike valve. So if it feels too comfy on a fire road, chances are you are not setting it up properly...

  6. #6
    Bike Breaker.
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    I was offered a $1200 credit for the fork early on, but no, I thought I'd give the fork 1 more chance, it broke down three times after that. I knew Specialized had a great warranty but in the end enough was enough. I would not rather go for warranty in the first place.

  7. #7
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iceman2058
    The spike valve schraeder is the one with the 6-sided nut on it - it requires a wrench to remove. The air spring schraeder is accesible via a "regular" cap - which can usually be twisted off by hand.

    If you were only running 70 psi in the main air spring chamber, the fork would defintely feel plush...but it would also sit halfway down its travel (since you should normally be running 104psi for your weight). In my experience, at the correct pressure, this fork does not feel very plush, it is actually quite harsh over small bumps - it only feels like a smooth long travel fork when you hit it hard enough to open the spike valve. So if it feels too comfy on a fire road, chances are you are not setting it up properly...

    So in that case, lowering the spike valve pressure, and consequently lowering the pressure required to open the valve should make smaller bumps feel less harsh, correct?

    That seems to make sense, but is that how it really works?

    I checked the sag last night, and I am only at about 30% wih that pressure, so I'm totally confused now.

  8. #8
    Nothing here
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    Quote Originally Posted by catnash
    I was offered a $1200 credit for the fork early on, but no, I thought I'd give the fork 1 more chance, it broke down three times after that. I knew Specialized had a great warranty but in the end enough was enough. I would not rather go for warranty in the first place.
    Daym, $1200 credit for a fork? You could've put a real nice replacement fork on there. DOH!

  9. #9
    Bike Breaker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknownrash
    Daym, $1200 credit for a fork? You could've put a real nice replacement fork on there. DOH!
    Yeah I had thought of the Talas R 36, but in the UK I would have had to budget for a new front wheel and stem.

  10. #10
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    Yeah the warranty of specialized is the bomb. Fast and virtually question free. They back there stuff up.

  11. #11
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    They back it up, but with the e-150 it's only for a year and then you are up a creek and out nearly $1500. My fork is 3 weeks old and on it's third set of internals on both sides... not a good sign.

  12. #12
    Now with More Wood
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    Quote Originally Posted by e-bo-b
    So in that case, lowering the spike valve pressure, and consequently lowering the pressure required to open the valve should make smaller bumps feel less harsh, correct?

    That seems to make sense, but is that how it really works?

    I checked the sag last night, and I am only at about 30% wih that pressure, so I'm totally confused now.
    That is how it works. However, by running the settings you describe, you would lose the advantages of the spike valve in the first place - which is to give you a fork that doesn't dive too much under braking, and that you can "lean on" a bit when popping the front (bunny hopping, popping obstacles etc) - but still be plush over bigger stuff. The spike valve gives you more low speed compression damping - which you need, generally.

    And sag is difficult to set. Just a small bit of stiction in the fork will throw it all off. I prefer to play with air pressure while riding, until I get the desired behavior.

  13. #13
    Fat Skis/Fat Tires
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    I just increased the pressure in the left fork to the recommended 108 psi, but it's been raining all day so I haven't had a chance to ride it. I'm now at the proper sag..

    Have you messed with your spike valve pressure at all? What were the results?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXPhisher
    They back it up, but with the e-150 it's only for a year and then you are up a creek and out nearly $1500. My fork is 3 weeks old and on it's third set of internals on both sides... not a good sign.
    New internals every week? What in creation are you doing to that thing?

  15. #15
    Now with More Wood
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    Quote Originally Posted by e-bo-b
    I just increased the pressure in the left fork to the recommended 108 psi, but it's been raining all day so I haven't had a chance to ride it. I'm now at the proper sag..

    Have you messed with your spike valve pressure at all? What were the results?
    Never really messed with it. I just checked its pressure a few times (paranoid about loosing pressure after reading all these threads about problems with this fork ). Anyway, it was slightly low the first time I opened it (factory set in other words), but its been stable at 70psi since I set it there.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by e-bo-b
    New internals every week? What in creation are you doing to that thing?
    The sad thing is, it hasn't left the shop. The shop keeps getting bad parts sent to them by Specialized. First was a bad travel adjust, then a rebound/compression that was 1mm too long, causing a pinging top out sound. The third set is being installed now... I've only been on two rides.

  17. #17
    Now with More Wood
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    Quote Originally Posted by TXPhisher
    The sad thing is, it hasn't left the shop. The shop keeps getting bad parts sent to them by Specialized. First was a bad travel adjust, then a rebound/compression that was 1mm too long, causing a pinging top out sound. The third set is being installed now... I've only been on two rides.
    Read your story in the other thread....3 times in a row the internals are 1mm too long....makes me wonder if it isn't the fork that is too short? Anyway, its clearly a Monday morning lemon you have there.

    I would categorically refuse any new internals at this point, and request a brand new fork from Spesh, or all your money back. Completely unacceptable.

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