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  1. #1
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    Vikingboy's 2013 Specialized Enduro SX build thread

    Thanks for all the positive comments on my previous build threads, its great to have been able to contribute something back to the MTB community.

    I sold my Specialized s-works Enduro last year after acquiring a 180mm SX Trail. Some of my regular riding mates stepped up to bigger 180 or 200mm bikes and immediately started to pull away from me on rougher sections of trail where the Enduro was starting to feel a bit on the ragged edge and uncomposed. The additional suspension travel and rigidity of the rear end were the most noticeable improvements over the Enduro and gave me the ability to carry more speed through rougher sections of trail and additional confidence to hit bigger drops and gaps. Its been perfect for trail centres like Cwmcarn & Aston Hill and got me out of more trouble than I care to recall.

    A year later and Iíve started to ride some different areas and began to feel that the SX Trail may be overkill for some of the tamer trails I ride where the added suspension saps some of the pedaling effort and mutes the Ďfuní of the trail. Earlier this year a friend of mine made me aware of some new hardcore hardtails coming to market which looked a whole lot of fun.....and so the research into a new bike started.

    I considered ĎThe Shaní from Production Privee, Production Privee | SHAN 917 // Mountain Biking Videos on MPORA and the BTR Belter, Belter | BTR Fabrications , BTR Fabrications - YouTube both looked like they could be a lot of fun and take some punishment. I also looked at short travel suspension designs like the Transition Double Transition Bikes and Orange Blood Orange Mountain Bikes - 2010 Orange Blood. I even considered having a custom frame produced by a company like Nicolai.

    I knew pretty much what I wanted in principle, Iíve ridden enough bikes now to know what I like and what suits my riding style, namely short chain stays, a rigid back end free from flex, a low bottom bracket, slack head angle and a poppy playful suspension system that jumps well.
    My research was complete when Specialized announced the Enduro SX earlier this year.



    Looking at the data on the frame, it ticked nearly all the boxes...



    419mm chainstays, 311mm bottom bracket and a 68 degrees head angle. Perfect for a dedicated 4x or dual slalom bike but not quite what I had in mind but nothing that couldnít be tweaked and addressed later.

    I knew I wanted to build this up as a hardcore short travel play bike rather than the outright 4x race bike it was intended to be. I wanted it to be fast but no silly lightweight build as I also wanted it to be capable of hitting jumps and the UKs more popular DH runs.


    Suspension
    In my experience, front suspension is critical to a great bike, what the front wheel does dictates to a larg extent how the rest of the bike will follow. Well setup bikes enable the rider to Ďfeelí whats going on at the rubber & ground interface and that builds confidence.
    Iím a heavier rider and like hitting stuff fast and hard, I hate flexy stuff, it creates vagaries that mask whats going on at the tyres. Without this critical feedback I start to loose confidence and want to back off. To provide a solid interface, I wanted a 20mm through axle and at least 34mm stantions.
    This removed some options straight away like the Fox 831 and Rockshox Pike. Having spent a few years now on Bos suspension, Iíve grown accustomed to its superb performance. Of all the forks Iíve ridden, Bosí offerings constantly impresses me the most. They provide outstanding damping providing unmatched levels of traction and chassis composure as well as being easy to dial in.
    Bos donít offer anything with less than 140mm as stock so I set about modifying a set of 170mm Devilles. After analysing the SX frames geometry, suspension dynamics & stack height, I settled on 130mm travel as optimal. I replaced the stock Bos seals with SKF seals which reduce stiction even further than standard and customised the internal air and oil volumes to provide a the desired ramp-up through the travel.




    Wheels
    Its pretty obvious that large heavy rotating wheels will have a significant influence on a bikes handling and performance.
    Iíve had great results in the past running Easton wheels, both the carbon Havens and the aluminum Havocís which I used on my Enduro and SXTrail. Both of these wheelsets are 20mm/12x142 axle sizes and this frame and fork setup would have allowed me to run these wheels if I wanted. Nothing like a new build though to do some market research and see whats new out there.
    I knew I wanted wide rims, I like the tyre profile and stability they provide. I knew I also wanted rims which which could be run tubeless and are ĎUSTí without internal drilling reducing strength and requiring the hassle of needing rim strips to run tubeless.
    Iíve used the popular Stans Flows before and had nothing but grief (and associated crashes) with tyres blowing off rims and wouldnít use them again for anything other than XC use. I believe in tubeless but only when done right, and right for me is UST rims with suitable tyres.
    I love the rigidity of wheels built on carbon rims as they often use higher spoke tensions which provides a stiffer wheel. I looked at Enveís
    but ruled out the AM wheels as they werenít recommended for use in dual slalom or DH use and require rim strips to be run tubeless. I didnít like the idea of the DH models 21mm internal width and so moved on in my search. I may revisit them again in future but Iíd like to try a pair first before committing the spend blind on them.
    I noticed a few guys running DT Swiss FX1950s on some DH tracks recently and discovered they were a UST rim with a massive 27mm internal width and using tried and tested DT Swiss 240 hubs.
    They use DT Aero Comp spokes laced in an open crowfoot pattern and build up really stiff. I like the fact the hubs are easily converted between standards and the freewheel runs very quietly. A XD driver is available for them too which will be useful for a possible future upgrade.




    Iím a big fan of Specialized range of tyres currently, they offer superb tread patterns, a wide range of carcass configurations and rubber durometers. Iíve selected to run Butcher SXís (920g, compound 50a/45a, 60TPI casing) front and rear on the FX1950 for their blend of puncture resistance, carcass stability and ease of rolling. Fitted at 30psi they sit at 57.5mm width block-to-block. I may run a Purgatory GRID rear in the future for a faster rolling tyre but there isnít any inventory available to me currently.






    Iíll probably end up running the Carbon Havenís from time to time too. They will be fitted with less burly tyres probably something from Specializedís Control range. They weight in about 500g less than the FX1950ís and with lighter tyres saving a few hundred grammes per wheel should drop over a kg off the final bike weight.





    Brakes
    Brakes were quite a tough decision to make for this build. I wanted to run lighter brakes primarily as Iím not planning on using them much. I also wanted to reduce any noise and speed scrubbing associated with pad rubbing.
    Shimano XT/XTRís have been getting fabulous reviews over the last couple of years but one of the hardest things I find to adapt to as I swap between bikes are brakes. I decided to stick with Formula brakes as I also run them on my SXTrail. They have been hassle free for me over the last 18 months or so and Iím experienced in bleeding them now to get optimal feel and performance. I also have a fair few service parts lying around which made it a no brainer.
    I wanted black and red brakes to match the colour scheme of the frame but after purchasing a set of OEM T1s I found they used a much inferior RX master cylinder. I ended up buying a set of 2013 ROís which came handily in black. The gold accents werenít ideal but I guess they matched with the Kashima shock coating. They come with ECT this year which adds some addition pad rollback for better pad/rotor clearance.
    The ROís are the best brakes Iíve had the pleasure of using. Lever feel is awesome and dialing it in to personal preferences is simple due to the TFRA and FCS adjusters. The FCS adjusters also handily compensate for pad wear too so no need to replace pads at 50% wear anymore which was a problem on the older Formula brakes. Power is fantastic as the oval piston is said to perform like with 4-pot levels of power.

    I considered running Formulaís R1s but the weight penalty for moving up to ROís seemed pretty insignificant especially when contrast to the additional stoping power offered by the oval pistons in the ROís and hopefully this would compensate for running smaller rotors too.

    From the March 2012 Bikeradar brake test (How We Test Hydraulic Disc Brakes - BikeRadar)



    Model Weight Piston Power
    Formula RO 418g 24mm oval 124Nm
    Formula R1 355g 22mm 107Nm
    Formula T1 393g 24mm 121Nm
    Shimano XTR Trail 407g 22mm 112Nm



    Iíve decided to try 160mm rotors, Iím not expecting to be using the brakes for long as most Uk runs are relatively short and I dont think over heating will be a problem. I went with two piece rotors to help keep things silent and also provide maximum heat dissipation. If I donít have enough stopping power or suffer with over heating Iíll step up to 180mm rotors but I think thats probably overkill right now.

    Hoses were trimmed to suit and both brakes were bled with fresh Castrol SRF fluid which offers a higher boiling point than the cheaper usual stuff. Having boiled fluid before in the Alps I know I donít want a repeat occurrence.








    Drivetrain
    Potentially an area for further experimentation. I like low bottom brackets but I hate pedal strikes. I wanted to run 165mm cranks as per my SXTrail but didnít want to carry the weight penalty of the stiff and flawless Shimano Saints. Sadly Sram donít offer their carbon crank arms in 170mm and the 165mm version only comes in a 86mm wide DH fit, not suitable for the SXís bottom bracket shell.
    Having done some research I discovered all the Sram cranksets use the same arms and figured if they can take the hammering the pro DH guys give them then Iím sure they will cope with what I throw at them. I ended up with a pair of XX1 cranks which came with a 32 & 34T XX1 chainring.
    Iíve settled on a 11-25 Dura-ace cassette out back. Iím not planning on riding this bike cross country so didnít want to go with a compromised lower range as you get with 11-36 or 10-42 cassettes. I think the 25 tooth cog should be fine for getting me around between the DH/fun sections of trail.
    I had hoped to be able to utilise a lower geared cassette, something like the 9-20 Capreo hybrid or a 10-25 speed X0-DH type. At the moment Iíve not been able to find a way to make a Capreo system work and Sram seem to be missing the point of X0 as a DH groupset as it appears to be become a cheap XX1.
    I like to see Sram utilise the XD driver technology and produce a 10-25 speed DH cassette. This would enable running a smaller chainring up front increasing ground clearance of bikes with low bottom brackets. See what Specialized did with the Demo8 team bikes for further info.

    Running a KMC x10sl chain with Titanium Nitride coating. Not sure about the gold (except it matches the Kashima shock and now the brakes!) but the one Iíve run on my SXTrail has lasted way beyond anything from Sram or Shimano has ever lasted before. Strength wise Iíve never broken one and the wear rate is positively glacial, even in the sandy mud that the UK can provide. Highly recommended and my go to chain of choice these days.




    Some cranks....


    XX1 weight


    X0 DH weight


    X0 weight


    Chainline




    Crank frame clearance - Q168


    34T ring weight



    Chainguide
    To minimize any drivetrain losses from rollers or other such chain retention devices, I considered running without any chain guide which is possible on the XX1 chainring. I settled on using a upper guide only primarily because it weighs very little and as it doesnít touch the chain there is no drag associated with it. The E.thirteen TRS+ guide ( TRS+ Single Guide | the hive ) was perfect as it allowed me to remove the lower pulley, if I plan to ride rougher terrain I can always bolt it back on too so has added flexibility.






    Shifters
    As Iím running a tight ratio cassette, I could have run a X0-DH derailleur with the more optimal movement across the cassette but sadly its not available with a clutch mechanism. I wanted to run a TypeII derailleur to avoid having to run a chainguide which increases drag and reduces efficiency. Never had an issue with Sram X0 short cage derailleurs so went with a Type II version this time. Needed to lube the clutch mechanism even from new for it to operate smoothly. It was a fairly simple operation once I figured out what was up.
    Shimano SP41 full length outer with sealed ferrules and 1.1mm stainless teflon coated cables ensure smooth shifting through the worse of the British mud.





    Shifter cable routing




    Pedals
    Had nothing but a great experience running Point1 Podiums. Low platform height helps with ground clearance, wide platform is great to rest my size 11s on and with longer pins, enough grip to ensure my foot stays where its supposed to. To date, Iíve never lost a pedal and therefore loathed to change. Iíve got the bearing replacement tool and a bag of spare bearings so easy to service when needed too. Starting to look well worn in now.


    Saddle
    Years on a SDG Ti-Fly have moulded my behind into a SDG Fly shape so sticking with what works although trying a lighter I-beam setup. I like the idea of a single bolt adjuster and the range offered is great than a conventional rail setup which is useful.
    The low seat tube means there isnt much room for running a long post, not if you want to drop it down anyway. I have tried the Reverb from my SXTrail and it fits fine. At the bottom of travel it moves the saddle well out the way still and at full extension is high enough to allow the bike to be pedaled easily.




    Stem & Bars
    Bars are a very subjective point. Iím fairly broad across the chest and I prefer wider bars, I found 780mm to be ideal for me although havent tried 800ís yet. I like the rise & sweep configuration of Renthals bars so stuck with them again for this bike although using a 38mm rise to compensate for the low frame.
    I used to run Chromag OSX bars but there is too much flex in them for me, I hated the feeling of the ends moving around as I rode. Renthals weight more but are absolutely rock solid. Iíd be interested to try the Easton 35mm setup at some point, see if this can improve on the feel of the Renthal. I could be tempted to run carbon bars again...I think.
    Renthal lock-on grips are finally in the market and about time. Sorry ODI but you are no longer the best! The bonded caps on the Renthals mean you donít get any of that annoying rocking you got with >1 week old ODIís. They are also slimmer, softer & gripper. Pity about the colour though!
    Iíve been a fan of shorter stems and longer top tubes for some time now. The Enduro SX has a shorter reach than my Enduro or SXTrail so Iíve gone back to a 50mm stem. Handily the Renthal comes with 10 degrees rise so helps with bar height too. The Renthal stem is also light and solid although a bit more of a faff to fit due to the unconventional mounting system they use to enable further machining of the inside.







    Headset
    Not much of interest here other than I like good quality stainless steel bearings with robust sealing to keep the worst of the British weather out.
    Specialized have moved to a integrated setup on the SX which allows the use of internal bearings with tapered forks. Not needing to run a external lower cup allowed me to utilize a 130mm fork rather than 120mm.
    Fitting is also easy as the bearings just drop into the frame, no need to press them in. Makes replacement quick and easy when the times comes.
    Last edited by vikingboy; 06-30-2013 at 09:02 AM.

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    Chassis
    Iíve ridden Horst link suspension designs for long enough now to understand its strengths and weaknesses. It works well for my style and type of riding and I feel Horst links weaknesses are less of a compromise for me than other types of suspension. Obviously this isnít true for everyone otherwise Aaron Gwin wouldnít be having such a bad time right now!

    Out of the box, on the 130mm forks the head angle sat at 66.75ish degrees with a 13Ē bottom bracket, by using a offset shock bush, Iíve been able to reduce it to the target 65degree and 12.5Ē BB height. This is for me the perfect AM geometry.











    Review
    Iíll save a full review until Iíve spent more time on it but immediately obvious in a very brief test is the rapid acceleration. There is no wallowing shock soaking up rider inputs, power is transferred efficiently from crank to wheel. The incredibly stiff rear end which is built upon the stays & clevis from the current 165mm Enduro does not flex. The bike feels poppy and playful and partly due to its low weight is incredibly easy to maneuver in the air. Bike currently sits at 12.6KG on my park scales.

    Rear shock will need tinkering to get setup for me and there are some off the shelf options available which Iíll start to explore as well as look into more Ďextremeí options. I canít wait to start dialing this bike in and getting to know its traits....I suspect its going to be a job just trying to hold on to it!



    Iíll get some better pictures when I am out next.
    Last edited by vikingboy; 06-30-2013 at 08:26 AM.

  3. #3
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    Great write up and pics. Looking forward to your thoughts.

    P

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    Great write up and awsome build.
    Looking forward to your full review and shock tinkering...

    Cheers!

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    That's a light build, especially with those tires. Really interested in the performance of the rear shock. My 2010 blew through over half the travel without much effort until I had it PUSHed. It performs much better now but still wouldn't mind it stiffer for DJing but I've gotten use to it and not ready to spend the money on a new frame yet. I had an 06 before the 2010 and definitely my favorite bikes. They can do it all.

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    Beauty

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    THIS thread is worth reading.

    Awesome build!

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    Fox volume reducer kit ready to experiment with.....


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    Quote Originally Posted by OffCamber View Post
    That's a light build, especially with those tires. Really interested in the performance of the rear shock. My 2010 blew through over half the travel without much effort until I had it PUSHed. It performs much better now but still wouldn't mind it stiffer for DJing but I've gotten use to it and not ready to spend the money on a new frame yet. I had an 06 before the 2010 and definitely my favorite bikes. They can do it all.
    Thanks for the feedback. It doesnt feel like it blows through travel for sure! Ive only put 220psi in it and its FIRM, and thats on the CTD 'D' setting too! I could imagine 300psi and the C or D setting it would be hard tail like. I can see a push tune coming very soon though. Other shock experimentation is going to take a but longer due to the specialized nature of things and the tight frame, remote canisters/brain hybrid perhaps? Its definitely a solid back end though and feels free from flex so far.

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    That's good to hear. What do you weigh? I'm about 190 with gear and was running the large and medium volume reducers (which your only suppose to run the medium) before I had it PUSHed. Might throw the medium in one day just to try it out.

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    Im 230lbs right now.

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    Need more speed - 36T ring installed.


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    Bike comes standard with 0.40"^3 spacer fitted.
    Fox kit includes @ 0.60"^3 which appears like it should work.
    0.80" & 0.92" spacers are increased diameter so don't fit the aircan obviously.


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    seems more people have had trouble get headsets which fit correctly from specialized.
    I ordered a few up in the end and this is the one that worked.

    Token Integrated Campagnolo Headset | Buy Online | ChainReactionCycles.com

    1 Token Integrated Campagnolo Headset - 1.1/8" - Black
    ID: 132150
    Unit Price: £13.49

    the bearings were fine from Specialized I but the top cover cap didnt fit either down over the top sealing them correctly or the right diameter, being a couple of mm wider diameter.

    Hope this helps anyone looking for a headset.

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    Just a stunning build, thinking about sapping my Tazer VP FRO frame for one of these frames if I can still find one that is

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    hihow did you order theframe? did yo just go strait to your delear or did you order onlie?
    i am very intrestedingetting onethis frames.
    sick build cant wait to see reviews

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    I went through my regular dealer. They are standard model for '14 so everyone should be able to get who wants one.

    mini-review: unbelieveably freaking awesome! Still getting to grips with tuning suspension but so far blown away by it.

  18. #18
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    Have you looked at other options for rear shock?Can you get other shocks that will fit in the specialized yolk and is that CDT only for specialized or can you get it aftermarket from fox?

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    It wouldnt be a vikingboy thread if I hadn't looked at changing it out for something involving some faffing around

    The challenge is getting another shock to fit in the tight frame space, I'm going to look at a CCDBa or maybe a Bos shock but my initial instinct is that the CTD is pretty good with the increased volume spacer.
    Certainly I'm getting decent bottom out resistance with 20/25% sag and without resorting to 300psi. I'm actually thinking about going back to a slightly steeper too. Too early for any definitive conclusions right now though.

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    How would you get those shocks to fit the spez yolk?I'm asking because I wan't to see if it is possible to fit my ctd shock on a 2014 epic which has now changed from eyelet to yolk mount.

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    Review please i Am really considering one buy but i would like to here some user info how does work for trail riding?

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    Hia maiduska,

    I'll try answer you [just noticed that I answered the wrong thread, my reply was to Vikingboy's earlier SXTrail build, all the same some of it still applies]

    You can definitely use an SX for trailriding.

    I think, though, it's really classed as almost a park bike, perfect for Darren Berrecloth style riding like in ROAM (on his early SX).
    the slack head angle you can get used to, but it's probably just a bit heavy for XC and if you like to sit and grind up you need to know it can be tough to get the seat to XC pedalling height and/or position because of the seat tube angle and length.

    Having said that, are you tough? Mark Weir, it's said, used to do all day rides with 8000+ feet of climbing on a SantaCruz VP free with DH tyres and a single chainring - when asked if he ever walked on steep up's it's reported he replied that he'd rather retch up his lungs up than walk up.
    leelikesbikes.com - Hanging with Mark Weir

    I guess it depends what you're looking for and are you strong
    slow up fast down - yes, perfect - that's my kind of ride and would suit the SX.

    dirt jumps and carving fast berms, yes to the SX.

    keep up with Enduro riders on light bikes with stiff suspension all day - not really.

    In the end, I bought a Nicolai AM, very adjustable, 135 to 171mm rear travel, sometimes I run the BOS VIPr air shock, sometimes the S**Toy coil. Sometimes a 160 BOS Deville air air fork, sometimes a BOS Idylle 180 coil fork [set to 170] with bigger tyres too.
    I'm an old guy so for long singletrack rides in the forst I need the light build.
    The heavier build is fabulous, but it's tough to pedal fast on undulating singletrack.
    That should tell you want kind of rider I am - I have a 29er too [Pivot 429, light build], but it stays on the hook most of the time.

    What stopped me getting the SX [I even rode Vikingboy's earlier SXTrail featured here and loved it] was the work needed to fit the BOS S**Toy shock that I love so much.
    Vikingboy, the creator of this thread managed it, but he told me it took some engineering.
    Last edited by mudfish801; 08-21-2013 at 04:08 AM. Reason: edit

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    Thanks fore the response , are you refering to the old sx?
    Trying to Get info on the new enduro sx, but thanks any way good review

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    Hia

    yeah, sorry
    I wrote it thinkingof the older thread!
    SX Trail in Vikingboy's other thread []Vikingboy's 2012 Specialized SX Trail build thread,
    however a lot of what I wrote still applies tho'.
    especially seated pedalling restrictions.
    it's pretty short in the front centre aswell I am told

    I didn't ride the 2013 short travel one.

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    vikingboy, did you sell that ccdb you fitted to your enduro? i would've bought that from you! Fitted a RS Monarch plus rc3 that i tuned and it has been really nice but not ccdb nice!

    Great build thread as always! Building up one myself to replace an '09 version sx slopestyle i've been riding. it's the original short 100mm travel version sx trail they made for the claw that was used for ss, 4x, ds. Building mine up singlespd again. Plus-sized bmx style is so good on this bike since it was designed for ds! great on a bmx track! Just doing a parts transfer. singlespeed and just the rear brake with a stepped down xfusion vengeance to 110mm. I love the low bb height it gets. railin ruts!

    seriously...did you sell the mod ccdb?
    i'm on my Last Herb
    RestInPeace Hook

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