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  1. #51
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    Got a questions for you guys. I just pulled the front tire off my 2013 FSR Stump Jumper. The side of the tires say 2 Bliss Ready and the rims are taped with tape (23mm wide) with the same logo, 2 Bliss Ready (see pics). I also have a roll of Stan yellow tape that is 21mm wide. Do I need to remove this tape and replace with the Stans? Is the 2mm difference gonna matter? I am ready to go tubeless but not sure if I am ready to go or need to re-tape.

    Big bonus! the stems I got with the bike have removable cores
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tube vs.Tubeless Weight Analysis-img_20121115_193342.jpg  

    Tube vs.Tubeless Weight Analysis-img_20121115_193316.jpg  

    Tube vs.Tubeless Weight Analysis-img_20121115_193501.jpg  

    Last edited by panicstop; 11-15-2012 at 08:37 PM.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by GnarBrahWyo View Post
    I just switched over to tubeless today. Did it mainly to avoid getting so many flats. Just for shi&ts though I weighed both of my wheels before and after. Lost 7-8 ounces of my wheelset. Now my 29er wheels weigh less than my old 26er!
    IMO, shedding weight is NOT the main reason for going tubeless.
    Avoiding Flats and increasing the contact point surface is the biggest bonus.
    Don't forget to fill with Sealant every 3 months or so.
    Best way is to use the valves with the removable core and inject the fluid from the valve without cracking open the sidewall.
    Prior to injection you can rotate the wheel so the valve is at 6:00, remove the core and use a plastic straw to inspect if there is any sealant left.





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  3. #53
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    Ok, went ahead and converted and all seems well so far. Tires are holding pressure and no leaks. Did not use extra tape but stayed with the rim tape that came on them OEM.
    Currently have ~30psi F/R, my wieght is 182 no gear. We will see... Here's the instructions I found on Specialized web site. http://service.specialized.com/colla...tion-Guide.pdf


    BTW - how are you guys measuring your pressures? Digital presta gauges??

  4. #54
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    BTW - how are you guys measuring your pressures? Digital presta gauges??

    I just measure it by feel. I just squeeze the tire until it feels right for the terrain. It took me a bit to get that figured out.
    I like to hug trees at FULL SPEED!

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by panicstop View Post


    BTW - how are you guys measuring your pressures? Digital presta gauges??
    Amazon.com: Topeak D2 SmartGauge: Sports & Outdoors

    Reliable - recommended.
    You'll be amazed how much you can be mistaken judging air pressure by feeling it by hand.
    Don't risk an air burp... make sure your ir pressure is dialed before EVERY ride.
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  6. #56
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    OMG I will kill myself if anyone will advertise this crap topeak tire pressure gauge again Do not buy this, it does not work and if you search google you will find many people having problems with it, I even saw some people complaining on this forum please stay away.

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by madhead View Post
    OMG I will kill myself if anyone will advertise this crap topeak tire pressure gauge again Do not buy this, it does not work and if you search google you will find many people having problems with it, I even saw some people complaining on this forum please stay away.
    Please don't kill yourself
    I don't advertise it, but since I use it on a regular base for a year and it works flawlessly I feel that I can recommends it to a fellow rider.

    Check out Amazon - it got 41 reviews, out of them, only 5 people gave it 2 and 3 stars...
    There is even a video of a user showing how to use it correctly...
    Flash29C2
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  8. #58
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    Thanks Stumpy, I did get a gauge, name not mentioned , and have to agree that for me squeezing the tire doesn't quite do the job!

    Have with nearly 40 miles on tubeless tires I have had no issues and by running the lower tire pressures I also see the benefit of it being easier on the hands too! I'm running 28 psi F/R with a rider weight of 180.

  9. #59
    J-Flo
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    Mounting the tires tubeless can be a real challenge if you don't have an air compressor. My experience:

    1. S-Works Ground Control 29x2.1 and 29x2.3 on Roval alloy (stock Stumpjumper) wheels -- no problem. Mounted easily and sealed with a floor pump on the first try. Took only a few minutes.

    2. Maxxis Ignitor EXO 29x2.1 on Stan's Flows, mounted with floor pump, took a little effort but it was pretty easy. Sealed very well, a good tire (used on the front), hardly any sealant evaporated in 2 months.

    3. Maxxis Crossmark 29x2.1 on Stan's Flows, mounted with floor pump, took a vigorous effort and fiddling with the rim for a while to get the bead to seat. This was not an EXO tire and most of the sealant evaporated in 2 months (there was a bit of visible sidewall weeping from time to time).

    4. Schwalbe Nobby Nic 29x2.25 and 29.25 on Stan's Flows -- totally hopeless with floor pump. Air compressor did not have a presta valve attachment, so was useless. The tire felt rather loose on the rim (I could spin it on the rim) and simply did not want to seal up. I finally gave up, poured out the sealant, and installed tubes so I could go for a ride. I will switch them back to tubeless once I get access to an air compressor.

    I was running the tubeless Maxxis tires above at fairly low pressure, about 24 psi front/28 psi rear. But the instructors at a recent clinic were adamant that this sacrifices control and is too low for me (I weigh 215lbs with gear), and recommended I run 40 psi, even on relatively technical terrain. I was surprised, particularly given all I have read about the alleged advantages, bigger contact point, added suspension etc. of running low pressure. These guys clearly are expert all-mountain/downhill riders who know their stuff, so I had to trust them. The bike is bumpier with the higher pressure but at least thus far I do think it tracks better through bumps and hard turns
    Last edited by Jfloren; 11-25-2012 at 03:53 AM.

  10. #60
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    Like mentioned before, must add sealant every few months. BUT, I always crack open the side wall to inject more because you will notice a funny looking hard ball of sealant that has dried up. It's a good idea to remove it.

  11. #61
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    Thanks for the great weight info. As a additional data point, I just went tubeless this week on a 2013 Specialized Camber Comp. First ride today. Huge improvement in traction, control, and smoother ride. Even rolled faster on my East coast root infested home trail. I retained the OEM red rim tape and Ground Control tires. Simply added Stan's stems with removable cores and used 1 1/2 small bottles of Stans sealant. By removing the 5 1/2 ounce OEM tube, adding the 1/3 ounce Stan's stem, and adding 3 3/4 ounces (in weight) of Stans I saved only 1 3/12oz on the rear. With a heavier front tube I saved about 3 1/4 ounces. I had zero trouble with the beads seating using a small compressor. I put the Stan's sealant in though the removable core stems--also easy. After just one ride today, I can tell I am impressed with the increased traction, smoother ride, and improved control. I gained 1/2 to 1 mile in moving average today, just from this one change to my bike. And I was sick today. Only time will tell whether going tubeless will be problematic, but right now I don't plan on going back!

  12. #62
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    Great data point. Thanks!
    '12 S-Works Stumpjumper carbon HT
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  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattyrides07 View Post
    EPICFSR, why do you like running 35 psi? If its because of stopping pinch flats, guess what? NO PINCH FLATS WITH TUBELESS! .

    This is not true. I have had several tires (Not a Specialized tire that I can recall) Get small snake bites just above the bead where the tire bead meets the sidewall. This is the tubeless equivilant of a pinch flat. I do get about 95% less flats running tubeless with stans, but it is still possible to pinch flat with low pressure.
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  14. #64
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    Interesting thread. Would have been interesting if the OP had captured the weight of the removed tubes. I have a SJ 2013 Elite, and similar to pedalwheezer & panicstop, the OEM tubes only weighed 5.0 & 5.5 oz and the wheels came the yellow rim strips. After adding 3oz (fluid) of Stans, I saved ~50g per tire. The front tire went from 2055g to 2006g (the scale could measure down to 0.25 oz).

    Between the low weight tubes and reasonably weight wheels (i.e., my Elite SJ has Control Trail 29 wheels which are 1800g), to loose much more weight, will require a reasonably large investment.

    Actually, as the tires weigh 755g (Purg. Ctrl 2.3 2Bliss) and 710g (Ground Ctrl 2Bliss), there may be an opportunity to lighten those if I go with some Schwable tires...

    As far as the tire pressure that a rider uses, it is tied pretty closely to ones weight (assuming we all had the same riding style and terrain) -- as I weigh 210-215 lbs when I ride, I typically run around 30lbs of pressure.

  15. #65
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    Hi guys im going tubeless for the first time ever so im a bit freaked out about it as i ride a lot of tarmac and some trails and dirt road kind of terrain so i im gonna buy the continental sealant as it is the one my lbs has i also bought the specialized floor pump the one little more costly is that enough to inflate a tubeless tire or do i need a compressor?
    Also can i use different pressure depending on where i ride?
    I am bit torn between using my current tires a S-works fast track in front and a fast track control rear if go tubeless with those i lower the weight of the bike by some grams but if i go tubeless on my new S-works Ground control 2.1 those might add some to the weight instead but i get a bit better grip in the woods and other off road areas.
    So go tube less with the ones on the bike or the new never ridden ones?

  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by PekkaS-works View Post
    So go tube less with the ones on the bike or the new never ridden ones?
    Either. The thing you will find is that tubeless rides faster, particularly as you can lower pressures further than with tubes. FWIW I did a race 2 weeks ago with a lot of very hard and dry farmland to traverse. Lowering pressures in this situation is much faster than having higher pressures.

    Also fwiw I have ridden tubeless for about 10 years. In that time I have only had 2-3 punctures.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by skiwi View Post
    Either. The thing you will find is that tubeless rides faster, particularly as you can lower pressures further than with tubes. FWIW I did a race 2 weeks ago with a lot of very hard and dry farmland to traverse. Lowering pressures in this situation is much faster than having higher pressures.

    Also fwiw I have ridden tubeless for about 10 years. In that time I have only had 2-3 punctures.
    Wow that sounds great i am convinced already but i just dont know which tire set to go with, and i can lower and add air as i can do with tubes inside i mean more pressure on tarmac rides and less off road?

    this is gonna be Epic in more than 1 way

  18. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by PekkaS-works View Post
    Wow that sounds great i am convinced already but i just dont know which tire set to go with, and i can lower and add air as i can do with tubes inside i mean more pressure on tarmac rides and less off road?
    chose a tyre as you normally would - tubeless or tubed is of little consequence. Choose a tread pattern for the front and the rear that makes sense for the terrain you regularly ride. I choose a good traction tyre with good rolling characteristics for the rear and one optimised for cornering grip which rolls well for the front. I like the FastTrak but find they don't handle loamy/sandy soil particularly well. I now have a Ron on the front and a Crossmark on the rear of my Epic.

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